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Invitation to the First SUSTech English Short Video Contest Award Ceremony and Sharing Meeting


Our students have made great achievements in the 9th "League Cup" Undergraduate College English Writing Competition in Guangdong Province

Our students have made great achievements in the 9th "League Cup" Undergraduate College English Writing Competition in Guangdong Province. On June 18, 2022, the online final competition and award ceremony of the 9th "League Cup" Undergraduate College English Writing Competition in Guangdong Province was successfully held. This competition is jointly sponsored by the Guangdong Provincial Undergraduate College English Course Teaching Steering Committee, the English Major sub-committee of the Guangdong Provincial Undergraduate College Foreign Language Major Teaching Steering Committee, and the China College English Writing Teaching Alliance. It is organized by the Guangdong University of Foreign Studies. As a co-organizer, the PIGAI (www.pigai.org) provides technical support throughout the process. Affected by the epidemic situation, the final competition was conducted online. Zhu Hanxu, a senior student of our university, won the Grand Prize of the college English group, Li Yueming won the second prize, and Liao Mingqian won the third prize. Our students' achievements in this final competition show the achievements of our center in the reform of English Writing Teaching in recent years. The 286 contestants who participated in the final competition came from 59 universities in Guangdong Province. They stood out from the 187935 contestants who participated in the preliminary contests and participated in the final as university representatives. A panel of 39 experts led by Professor Liu Jianda, chairman of the College English Teaching Steering Committee of Guangdong Undergraduate Colleges and Universities, vice president of Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, and Professor Zhang Xin, chair of the English Major sub-committee of the Foreign Language Major Steering Committee of Guangdong Undergraduate Colleges and Universities and head of the College of English Language, Culture and Chemistry of Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, reviewed 286 essays with the assistance of PIGAI. The panel selected 16 Grand Prizes, 50 First Prizes, 87 Second Prizes, and 118 Third Prizes based on the composition scores of the contestants in an open, fair and just manner.


Dragon Boat Festival Celebration with International Faculty and Students at SUSTech

The Dragon Boat Themed Event: “Pack Zongzi and Learn Chinese” was held on the campus on June 2. It was co-hosted by the Center for Language Education of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences and SUSTech Global. A group of international faculty and students participated in this event and celebrated the Dragon Boat Festival together. Prof. CHEN Yuehong, the Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, attended the event and delivered a speech. He introduced the three keywords closely related to Dragon Boat Festival: the beauty of the Chinese language, Quyuan, and Chinese culture to the international colleagues and students. He also encouraged them to understand the spirit and culture of the Dragon Boat Festival and experience the charm of the Chinese language through participating in Zongzi packing, which is regarded as one of the most important customs of the Dragon Boat Festival.Dr. CHEN Hao, the Executive Deputy Director of SUSTech Global, pointed out that SUSTech is a place where cultural diversity is respected. It is important to promote exchanges among people of different countries based on respect for cultural diversity.Dr. LI Yuan, the Director of the Center for Language Education, welcomed the international faculty and students and encouraged them to actively integrate into the SUSTech community. On behalf of the Center for Language Education, she expressed the CLE’s commitment to developing various language learning programs and activities to enhance the understanding of the culture embedded in languages.This Dragon Boat Festival Themed Event also served as the special ending session of the CLE Staff Chinese course in the 2022 Spring Semester. The course instructor, Dr. ZHU Wenhui, designed the situated learning activities, which were well received by the participants. In an active learning environment, the international faculty and students learned about the origin and history of the Dragon Boat Festival and learned the Chinese language associated to it. As a highlight of the event, all participants packed their own “Zongzi” under the guidance of the invited SUSTech chef.At this special themed event, SUSTech’s international faculty and students celebrated the Dragon Boat Festival, learned Chinese in a real-world context, and experienced traditional Chinese festival culture. 

Invitation to the Dragon Boat Festival Themed Event


A Journey through Architecture of the Antiquity by Prof. Marden Nichols

As the finale, on May 20th CLE Latin club hosted its guest speaker lecture with Professor Marden Nichols on the topic "Vitruvius and the Science of Architecture". Prof. Nichols is a professor of Classics at Georgetown University; her research interests focus on ancient literature, art, and architecture from the Roman Republic and early Empire. The lesson was delivered online via Zoom, some students also attended in person with Latin club coordinator Ms. Yang Luo.Prof. Nichols first summarized some distinguished findings from her research about Roman architecture and De Architectura, the only known surviving architecture guidance from antiquity. Then, she led her audience into the section where Roman houses were presented. With her passionate audience, Prof. Nichols compared and contrasted the structure, design and style of Roman houses across time. She ended her lecture with an inspiring conclusion to relate Roman houses with Roman politicians and their public life. As usual, the lecture ended with a heated Q&A session as members of the Latin club combined their knowledge with Renaissance authors and knowledge from their own field!For the next semester, the CLE Latin club will provide more opportunities and guest speaker lectures to enrich student’s language learning experience.

2022 SUSTech English Contests & "FLTRP · ETIC Cup” English Preliminary English Contests

 In May 2022, the Center for Language Education (CLE) held university-wide English public speaking, reading, and writing contests, which are also the preliminary English contests of 2022 "FLTRP · ETIC Cup.” Speaking ContestOn Saturday, May 14th, SUSTech students competed in a lively speaking competition on campus. Organized by CLE, this contest represents the preliminary level of the national competition sponsored by FLTRP. A total of seventeen students competed to produce 7 winners. All contestants delivered strong speeches in responding to the given topic about Ellen Johnson, the former president of Liberia’s inspiring quote about dreams. The grand prize winner was MIN Xuanyi, and the first prize winner was XIA Zihan. These two contestants will be SUSTech’s champions and represent us in the provincial level contest next semester. Second prize winners were LIANG Sida and LI Hengjie. Our 3rd prize winners were WANG Yingshuo, HE Shuang, and LI Jinchen.Grand Prize Winner: MIN Xuanyi   First Prize Winner: XIA Zihan  Reading ContestOn Sunday, May 15th, CLE held the SUSTech English Reading Contest on campus. 33 SUSTech undergraduate and postgraduate students participated in the competition.                                                 The 110 minutes contest was a comprehensive examination on contestants’ reading broadness and skills, including logical thinking and reasoning, reading for understanding, information processing and judgment. SUSTech students demonstrated strong English reading ability in this challenging contest. Among dozens of excellent “readers”, 12 students won the SUSTech English Reading Contest. They are: grand prize winner (XIA Zihan); first prize winners (ZHOU Ruijie and XIE Xinran); second prize winners: (HONG Chenxi, JIA Shiying, HE You and LI Qiaochu); third prize winners (WANG Zijie, TANG Shili, YANG Yi, CHEN Qianhui and XU Nan). Further notice about representatives on behalf of SUSTech for "FLTRP · ETIC Cup” provincial level contest will be announced next semester. Writing Contest FLTRP Preliminary Writing Contest was held on Saturday, May 21st in Teaching Building 1 at SUSTech. The writing contest aims to select excellent writers for the further provincial and national writing contest sponsored by FLTRP. Writing contest committee chose the genre of argumentative essay as the writing task for the participant students. Students were encouraged to write their authentic ideas creatively and critically. All participants completed the essay within 90 minutes, and their writings were collected by CLE 2022 Writing Contest Committee for further grading. CLE will announce the winners soon in June.  In the upcoming fall semester, a series of reading, speaking, and writing training workshops will be provided to prepare the preliminary winners for the provincial contests in November, 2022.   


CLE WORKSHOPS @RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES: Learning English through Music


CLE WORKSHOPS @RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES: Teaching How to Paraphrase and Summarize Using Chinese Philosophy


CLE Movie Club: “Gifted”

If the education for gifted children may be destructive for their psyche, is it better for the child to have a normal education? This is a main theme of the 2017 film “Gifted.” The CLE Movie Club met on April 19th to discuss the film and its topics of raising and educating gifted children. Throughout one hour of discussion, the participants addressed nature versus nurture, as well as cultural differences between China and the USA and other issues. The CLE Movie Club is an English conversation opportunity for the SUSTech community based on our shared love of film. Operating like a book club, the group will watch the selected films on their own, and then meet to discuss them. Discussions are led by CLE faculty (and movie club founders) Rongrong Dong and Al Evans. During the recent lockdowns, the club met online, and our usual meeting place is in SUSTech’s Yidan Library. We meet about every two weeks during the semester. Join us for our next film! We will meet on May 10th to discuss “Shoplifters.” This Japanese film is directed by Hirokazu Koreeda. Scan the QR code below to join our QQ group and find out more information about our next meeting.     

CLE Language Help Service is Back for the 2022 Spring Semester

CLE Language Help Service is back for this semester on April 25th! In Spring 2022, we will continue to offer CLE Language Help Service to the entire SUSTech community - students, faculty, and staff. All sessions of the first few days were fully booked immediately after its opening. The CLE Language Help Service is a one-on-one foreign language development service, with a commitment to providing ongoing language support to the SUSTech community. The service includes English writing support, speaking practice, and English learning consultation for all, as well as Chinese language tutoring for international students and staff. SUSTech members are welcome to reserve a 25-minute face-to-face session with a CLE faculty member. This semester, the CLE faculty will continue to offer more than 77 sessions per week to meet the demand for foreign language development at SUSTech. The CLE Language Help Service was launched in 2018 and has provided language help to a wide range of SUSTech members for more than four years. All CLE faculty endeavor to make this program an accessible pathway for the SUSTech members to achieve and extend their English language competitiveness and excellence! It also serves as a language hub for international faculty and students to adapt themselves to the work and life at SUSTech. 


Latin Club Spring 2022 No.4

Center for Language Education CLE is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.Join Zoom Meetinghttps://zoom.us/j/98291164788?pwd=L1pmWFdDZVZqZDB3cUp4RnU3UW5sUT09 Meeting ID: 982 9116 4788Passcode: 1234

Read Latin! New sessions of Latin Club

On March 25 and April 8, the CLE Latin Club completed two reading sessions. Due to the special situation this semester, the Latin Club meetings were still held online via Zoom. Ten core members attended, learned new vocabulary in Latin, and translated several passages in Latin.The meeting began with a mini-lecture given by the club coordinator, Ms.Yang Luo, followed by a Read-Out-Loud of Latin passages from the Oxford textbook in which students could comprehend and enjoy the story of the late republic of Rome. After reading through the texts, students were asked to interpret Latin vocabulary, and they translated passages word to word from Latin to English/ Chinese. All students showed great progress in understanding the Latin language and huge enthusiasm to pursue further in this journey to the ancient world.All SUSTech members are welcome to join the CLE Latin Club. Please scan the QR code of our WeChat group to receive our latest information and learning materials.


Global Discussion on March 23rd


"The Farewell": CLE Movie Club Discusses the 2019 Film

 The CLE Movie Club held its 36th meeting to discuss “The Farewell.” The 2019 film examines how a Chinese family deals with the approaching death of the grandmother by hiding her situation from her. The story follows one family member, a young woman who was raised in the USA, and her struggle to accept the family’s decision.  During the discussion on Tuesday night, 22 March, the movie club participants discussed a wide range of topics relating to the story and how Chinese culture views death. Issues included education, taboos, and how we face our own mortality. Cross cultural elements in the discussion involved the famous Dylan Thomas poem “Do not go gentle into that good night”, and a variation of the same sentiment presented by country singer Tim McGraw’s song “Live Like You Were Dying.” Additionally, films from other cultures were compared, including the Japanese movies “Ikiru” (1952), “Departures” (1998), and “The Bucket List” (2007). The CLE Movie Club is an English conversation opportunity. The group functions like a book club. Participants watch the selected movie on their own and come prepared to discuss the film and share their ideas. Come meet with us every two weeks during the spring semester of 2022!  Our next film is “Gifted” (2019). It is the story of a custody battle for an intellectually brilliant child. The movie looks at whether it is better for a child to have a normal life and relationships, or be placed in a program designed only to develop her “gift.” Join us on April 19th at 7pm to discuss “Gifted.” You can join our QQ group by scanning the code below. 


Latin club first meeting online

On March 11, the CLE Latin Club welcomed its first session. Due to the special situation this semester, the Latin Club meetings were held online via Zoom meeting for the time being. The first meeting was attended by 12 students, including 8 returning students. The meeting began with a mini-lecture given by the club coordinator, Ms.Yang Luo, followed by a Jeopardy in which students were asked to recap what they had learned last semester. After a brief review, Ms. Luo also outlined her plans for the spring semester: reading sessions, literature discussion forum, and guest speakers. The readings will focus on the Oxford Latin course and guide students to more linguistic components of Latin language. All SUSTech members are welcome to join the CLE Latin Club. Please scan the QR code of our WeChat group to receive our latest information and learning materials.

First Chinese Movie of 2022 Spring Semester

On March 5th at 7pm, the CLE Chinese Movie Club presented 2019 American comedy-drama film “Farewell/别告诉她”. The film tracks a Chinese-American family who, upon knowing their grandmother (nai nai) has only a short while left to live, decided to hide the truth from her and arrange a family reunion before she dies. At the 77th Golden Globe Awards, the film was nominated for two awards including Best Foreign Language Film, and Awkwafina won for Best Actress–Musical or Comedy.  After watching the film together online, two major topics: “the cultural differences in death and narrative control" and "the horror of death/life transience" were discussed. Participants passionately debated whether the grandma (nai nai) should be told that she had cancer or not from legal, humanistic, and cultural perspectives. How to live with the terror/anxiety of death is one of the universal human dilemmas. Through the movie and discussion, we see how the family confronts with anxiety and learns fear. The way they choose (not letting nai nai know) shows the abilities of the characters‘ (including nai nai herself) to endure the fear, which invariably leads to something miraculous happening (nai nai survived many years after her cancer).            The CLE Chinese Movie Club offers international students, staff, and movie lovers an unforgettable journey into Chinese language and culture. Please join us to watch a Chinese film or simply recommend other wonderful Chinese movies!


Latin Club Spring 2022 No.1

Center for Language Education CLE is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.Join Zoom Meetinghttps://zoom.us/j/97951345948?pwd=Q0IzN3pFM0U2YXVTNGJmYWtPSk9qUT09Meeting ID: 979 5134 5948Passcode: 1234

“Sleepless in Seattle” Goes Online

The CLE Movie Club had a return to its early days. To accommodate the constraints of the pandemic, the club moved to a familiar format, meeting online as it did its very beginning in 2020. On Tuesday, February  22nd, the film for discussion was “Sleepless in Seattle” from 1993. One of the main points of discussion was how the film is viewed today versus its original reception in the early 90’s. Additional issues examined included Hollywood’s portrayal of romantic behavior for men and women, as well as perceptions of romance here in China. The CLE Movie Club is an English conversation opportunity. The group functions like a book club. Participants watch the selected movie on their own and come prepared to discuss the film and share their ideas. Come meet with us every two weeks during the spring semester of 2022! Our next film is Togo (2019). What is the real story behind the 1925 serum run to Nome, Alaska? Why is Balto more famous than Togo? Why are there so many movies about dogs, but not so many about cats? Join us on March 8th at 7pm online for a chat about Togo. You can join our QQ group by scanning the code below.


CLE's "Staff Classes of Second Foreign Languages" Launched in 2022 Spring

In an effort to provide learning opportunities for more foreign languages to SUSTech faculty and staff, the CLE offers a series of second foreign language classes in the 2022 Spring semester. The classes include Staff Elementary Japanese, Staff Elementary Spanish, Staff Elementary German, Staff Elementary French, and Staff Intermediate French. Except for Staff Intermediate French, all other courses are of elementary level and focus on beginner level language skills, including survival skills, daily expressions, and pronunciation. The CLE's Second Language Program has got a high recognition in the SUSTech community. Launched in 2019, more than 336 SUSTech faculty and staff from different departments have enrolled in the program and enjoyed their learning of second foreign language with the CLE. In 2022 Spring, the CLE received around 300 applications to register for the courses. The learning needs listed in the application include international cooperation and exchange, literature reading in research projects, communication with international colleagues, and more. Taught in small-sized classes, the staff second foreign language courses feature active learning and interaction to help faculty and staff acquire a new language in an interesting and effective way, and raise their language proficiency to suit their needs at work. The mission of the CLE is to empower SUSTech students, including staff and faculty students, to succeed in their academic development and life locally and globally through innovative curriculum and diverse learning experiences. CLE enhances the university’s learning culture development with multi-dimensional foreign language learning resources and environment, as well as supporting the internationalization of the university and contributing to the development of an inclusive and friendly university culture. 

Switching to Live-Streamed Teaching: CLE Teachers Adapt to New Challenges in 2022 Spring

The 2022 Spring Semester started unexpectedly began with a live-streamed teaching mode due to a new wave of COVID-19 cases in Shenzhen. All courses are delivered in the form of live-streamed classes, where instructors deliver the teaching in the classroom and students participate in classes online. With more than 2,000 students enrolled in over 150 classes, the CLE teachers responded rapidly and adapted to the new conditions with creativity. Upon receiving the notification of the transition to live-streamed teaching, the CLE carefully reviewed the contingent teaching arrangements to ensure all classes were prepared and delivered. On February 11th, the first All-CLE meeting of spring 2022 was held to discuss and prepare for the leap to online. The CLE Live-Streamed Teaching Guide and checklist were distributed to all teachers during the meeting. Course coordinators from each course teaching group presented their updated semester plans including preparations for live-streamed teaching. Strategies for each course group were then discussed. Tips on live-streaming tools, classroom facilities, Blackboard preparation and more were also shared with the teachers. Before the first class, CLE teachers set up their virtual course space on Blackboard and provided clear guidance to students about how to participate in the live-streamed teaching activities. The administrative support team and individual teachers visited classroom facilities and tested software needed for classes to ensure a smooth start. Faculty placed a high priority on maintaining effective contact with students via multiple channels. Live-streamed teaching differs from classroom teaching and requires different approaches, especially for language classes that involve active learning and high interactivity. It requires lots of class preparation, testing, and patience. Despite all the difficulties, CLE teachers have been creative in adapting to this new form of instruction. Over the past two weeks, teachers have continually adapted, identified effective teaching practices under the special circumstances, and actively participated in sharing great ideas and techniques with colleagues. As the semester continues, the CLE is committed to meeting all challenges with creativity, applying techniques in new ways that are appropriate for the virtual environment. 


2022 Spring CLE Courses

In 2022 Spring, CLE offers a series of courses including CLE English core courses, Chinese courses for international students, elective courses focusing on cross-cultural communication, language skills, interdisciplinary language development, test preparation and second foreign languages. For further information, please vistit the website: 2022 Spring CLE Courses Introduction. 

2022 Spring CLE Courses

In 2022 Spring, CLE offers a series of courses including CLE English core courses, Chinese courses for international students, elective courses focusing on cross-cultural communication, language skills, interdisciplinary language development, test preparation and second foreign languages. For further information, please vistit the website: 2022 Spring CLE Courses Introduction. 


Spring Writing Center

In an effort to continue to offer writing support to the SUSTech community of learners, the Center for Language Education will continue to offer help for both students and staff through the Writing Center. In its fourth year, the Writing Center is conducted one-on-one for an on-needs basis with anyone on campus seeking assistance for any and all of their writing needs. SUSTech students and staff can pick their own day, time, and location to meet, by sending an email request to either Matthew Jellick (matthewj@sustech.edu.cn), Xiao Shi (shix@sustech.edu.cn), or Chu Yu (chuy@sustech.edu.cn) introducing themselves and briefly explaining their subject matter.Writing is an academic as well as creative output method for communicating with others, and the CLE Writing Center looks forward to working with you along your journey of self-expression.

Staff English Book Club

During the Spring 2022 semester, CLE Assistant Director, Matthew Jellick, will host the ninth(!) Staff English Book Club.  Each term we read different books from a wide range of multicultural perspectives, providing a platform for in-depth discussion and analysis of issues which affect us all, regardless of who we are or where we are from.This semester we will read Dinaw Mengestu's The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, which addresses the inward crisis of displacement, and how immigration to a new culture can create a loss of identity.  The author's Ethiopian background will provide a unique viewpoint for us to examine, and how the chasm between two worlds provides both opportunities as well as challenges.The Staff English Book Club is open to all faculty and staff at SUSTech, and we look forward to another successful term of honest discussions about challenging topics.


Learning and Teaching Shine at 4th Annual CLE Conference

The Center for Language Education (CLE) successfully held its 4th annual conference on January 6, 2022. The conference highlighted shared teaching and learning experiences in an English context at the Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech).  The theme for this year’s conference was “We teach for a shared future – inspired, motivated, and empowered together.” After the successful completion of three CLE conferences in past years, with wider acceptance and recognition, the 4th conference received more attention.  Twenty presentations were delivered on the day. Presenters, including both faculty members and students, shared facts and offered their opinions and experiences on teaching and learning. An award ceremony was held at the end to give further encouragement and empowerment to our students.The 4th CLE Conference on Teaching and Learning This year, Dr. Bonnie Youngs, Full Teaching Professor at Carnegie Mellon University, delivered the conference keynote speech. Dr. Youngs co-directs and teaches in the Masters in Applied Second Language Acquisition at Carnegie Mellon University. She is also the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of Modern Languages. Her courses include “Teaching methodologies for the foreign language classroom” and “Teaching modern languages and cultures”.Dr. Bonnie Youngs, the conference keynote speaker In this one-day conference, the featured presenters shared their discoveries and experiences, which consolidated their beliefs on teaching and learning. Through English and other subjects discussed, one common feature among all the presentations was how we understood student learning and our relationship to that learning. Learning is not an active compliance in the acquisition of the course concepts, but an active and reflective construction of those concepts. As teachers, they teach as learners who facilitate students’ construction of knowledge, and they learn together with them.Speakers from CLE in the morning sessionAfternoon Panel 1, G309 Lynn LibraryAfternoon Panel 2, Room 301, Administrative BuildingThe conference also invited speakers from other departments at and outside of SUSTech, including the Department of Design, Center for Social Sciences, the Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering, the School of Medicine, and Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University. They all shared valuable perspectives on teaching and learning, and brought possible future collaboration opportunities with CLE.Guest speakersThe conference demonstrates CLE’s commitment to teaching excellence together with its SUSTech community members. It also demonstrates the focus of their education in empowering students with knowledge and skills.  Dr. Yuan LI, Director of the CLE, believes that learning in universities is the construction of meaning through language as a system and its use. The quality of meaning and learning achieved is dependent on the extent and quality of exchange between teachers and students. Therefore, in a learning-focused community, knowledge is pursued with a broader sense of rationality, along with the value and power of creativity of the human mind.  “Teaching for a Shared Future sums up our approaches to teaching and learning. We are inspired, motivated, and empowered together! The CLE will never stop its development of a promising and excellent language center with a global vision in China,” said Dr. LI.Dr. Yuan Li, Director of the CLE, giving a speechGroup Photo of the Conference Participants

Learning Chinese Culture Through Chinese Calligraphy

Recently, a splendid, themed event to celebrate the Chinese language was held on campus. “The Beauty of Chinese Language: Learning Chinese Culture Through Chinese Calligraphy” was hosted by the Center for Language Education (CLE) in the Zhiren Activity Room on December 28th. The event was well received by the SUSTech international colleagues and served as an occasion to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Spring Festival.Dr. ZHAO (first row, third from left) and the participants with their workThis themed event also served as the special ending session of the CLE Staff Chinese course in the 2021 Fall semester. The course instructor, Dr. Wenhui ZHU, delivered a lecture on the Chinese Spring Festival. The international faculty learned the origin and history of the festival as well as the related Chinese language for greetings, such as “Xin Nian Hao!” (新年好) and “Gongxi” (恭喜).International faculty listening to the lecture about Spring FestivalThe calligraphy aspect was seen as the highlight of the event. It started with the first character, Fu (福), meaning “good fortune” in Chinese. Following the demonstration of Dr. Hui ZHAO, Vice Dean of the College of Art and Design of Shenzhen University, the participants practiced writing Fu stroke by stroke. They felt the pressure and speed variations of the Chinese brush when writing Chinese calligraphy with traditional ink brushes. Then the participants challenged themselves by writing four-word Spring Festival blessings on red paper.Components of penmanship in Chinese calligraphy: ink brush, ink slab, ink, and paper.“As an art of turning Chinese characters into images, ancient Chinese calligraphers got their inspiration from nature and formed their unique style,” Dr. ZHAO shared with the participants. In his view, the key to creating a good piece of Chinese Calligraphy is to find a balance among the characters despite the variance of their stroke numbers.International faculty writing Chinese CalligraphyOn this special occasion, the international faculty of SUSTech celebrated the Chinese Spring Festival, learned Chinese in the real context, and experienced the traditional Chinese art culture.


Club de Español: New Year's Eve traditions in Spanish-speaking countries


Latin Club Guest Speaker Series: Elizabeth Fisher

Continuing the topic from last week, on December 15th CLE Latin club hosted its second lecture with Professor Elizabeth Fisher on the topic "Women in Augustan poetry of Ovid". Prof. Fisher is a professor of Classics at George Washington University; her research interests Her research focuses upon the survival, reception, and reinterpretation of classical literature through translation and imitation, especially in the medieval Greek literary tradition of Byzantium. The lesson was again delivered online via Zoom, some students also attended in person with Latin club coordinator Yang Luo.Prof. Fisher first read through a biography of Augustan poet Ovid who was a contemporary of Vergil and was affected by late republican poet Catullus (the protagonist of the previous lecture). Then, she introduced women’s status under the reign of Augustus. With her passionate audience, Prof. Fisher compared and contrasted the living condition as well as public reception of women between the Roman republic and the early Empire. As usual, the lecture ended with a heated Q&A session as members of the Latin club combined their knowledge from previous lectures with Prof. Fisher’s inspiring talk.For the next semester, the CLE Latin club will provide more opportunities and guest speaker lectures to enrich student’s language learning experience.


Language Learning on Campus: English for Campus Security

On December 14th, 100 staff from the Office of Health, Safety and Environment attended the lecture "English for Campus Security", held by the Center for Language Education at Lynn Library. In this lecture, CLE instructors Jenny Hirst and Beatrice Clegg taught useful workplace English by recreating situations that happen daily on campus during the COVID-19 pandemic.Dr. Li Yuan, the Director of the Center for Language Education, giving a welcome speech to the attendees CLE instructors Beatrice Clegg (left) and Jenny Hirst (right) teaching  Attendees increased their knowledge and deepened their understanding of English related to conducting prevention and control measures of COVID-19 at SUSTech. This lecture provided a great chance for them to improve their oral English and pronunciation.English for Campus Security meets monthly from December and aims to provide useful workplace English, as well as practical English for oral communication through a situational approach, to staff who might need to communicate with international faculty and students.   

CLE Latin Club: Guest Speaker Katherine Wasdin on Women in the Ancient World and Poetry

The sixth session of the CLE Latin club was held on December 8th with a presentation by guest speaker Professor Katherine Wasdin on the topic "Women in the Ancient World and Poetry." Prof. Wasdin is a professor of Classics at the University of Maryland; her research interests include Latin poetry, Greek poetry, and the ancient world's reception. Although the lesson was delivered online via Zoom, a large number of students preferred to attend in person with Latin club coordinator Yang Luo.Prof. Wasdin began the first hour by introducing typical living conditions for women in antiquity through literary works and archaeological evidence. She next turned her attention to Catullus's love poetry, examining how a male author portrayed women from a patriarchal perspective. The talk concluded with a spirited Q&A session during which members of the Latin club raised several remarkable and in-depth inquiries concerning ancient life. It was encouraging to see the participants’ enthusiasm in the discussion their questions as the clock ticked beyond 21:30. More talks on ancient languages, literature and history will be held by the CLE Latin Club. Please stay tuned!


SUSTech English I Vocabulary Challenge

The final round of “SUSTech English I Vocabulary Challenge” was held successfully on the evening of December 9th. A total of 48 students from SE-1 gathered at Lychee Hills Building 1 for the final round. Congratulations to Wen Pengfei and Liang Yuge who won first place. In addition, four students—Zhang Yifei, Zhou Keyu, Long Shangyan and Pan Wenda, won 2nd place and six students—Zhu Youxin, Wang Yuqi, Zhu Xiaoyu, Huang Guojing, Hu Jiawei and Ding Zhuoyang were awarded 3rd place prizes.  Academic vocabulary is a major obstacle for freshmen at SUSTech. To motivate students, a vocabulary challenge has been designed for SE 1 students. This is the second year of the competition. The competition is a quick and enjoyable way for students to demonstrate their vocabulary mastery. The competition is based on several vocabulary lists. These include the New General Service List (core high frequency vocabulary words for students of English as a second language), New Academic Word List (high-frequency academic words in English), as well as CET-4. The first round was held at the class level during week eleven. Following that, the best five students from each class were selected to compete in the second round, one week later.With the support of our CLE director, secretaries, and all SE-1 teachers, the activity was successful. The vocabulary challenge has created more vocabulary-learning opportunity and strengthened SE-1 students' vocabulary proficiency during their first semester at SUSTech. Our winners deserve congratulations!The Final Competition Winners (two 1st place, four 2nd place, six 3rd place)48 SUSTech English I Students Participated

CLE Movie Club Discusses “Maudie”

The CLE Movie Club met Tuesday night, December 7th, to discuss the 2016 film, “Maudie.” The film is based upon the life of Canadian artist Maud Lewis.Participants had a lot to say about this film and regularly explored topics beyond those prepared by the hosts. Among these were relationships, marriage, the source of art, the connection between pain and art, the ways we express our feelings, and even the way that filmmakers change or use parts of people's lives in the service of a story in a movie.The movie inspired two of the club's participants to purchase books about the life of Maud Lewis and read them prior to the meeting. During the discussion, they frequently elaborated on the story by providing clarification or further details from the book.The CLE Movie Club is an English conversation activity. “Maudie” was the 32nd film covered by the club, which is now enjoying its 2nd year. It was co-founded by Al Evans and Rongrong Dong, two CLE faculty members sharing a common passion for movies.As part of a club tradition, members selected the final film of the semester. Come join us on Tuesday, 21 December, for our discussion of “The Legend of 1900.” You can join the group by scanning the QR code below and joining our QQ group.


Women in the Ancient World and Poetry


SUSTech Reader

The SUSTech Reader concluded its third successful year, with 10 groups of students performing their poetry in both English and Chinese during the Final Competition this past Saturday night.  Poetry places importance on individual words, and in turn, how they are recited gives extended meaning to them; illustrating through enunciation their role within a line or stanza.  Furthermore, patterns in poetry lend importance to the structure by which it was written, transmitting the author's intent, not just where, but how the poem is constructed.The finalists who preformed at the SUSTech Reader Competition paid heed to the power of words, and through their eloquent, decisive, and measured delivery, were all able to convey the intent of their respective authors, highlighting the themes of Virtue, Truth and Advancement.  Each group (or individual) who presented, did so with authenticity in their voice and emotion in their language, which is something that connects each poem, whether it be about a weeping willow, a long march, or the moon and stars.The professionalism of each participant gives credence to the hard work and dedication they put into practice, showcased through each of their performances, highlighting the power of poetry through another successful SUSTech Reader!


CLE WORKSHOPS @RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES #5: An effective management tool for your research: NoteExpress


CLE Movie Club Newsletter: The Lives Of Others (2006)

On November 23rd, CLE movie club had a great discussion about The Lives Of Others, an award-winning film that celebrates art, love, and humanity.We began our conversation with a discussion on characters’ motives in the movie. Many of us were amazed by how quick and effective the director built up the context for the story and drew audiences attention to the characters. Later, we moved to discuss the significance of art in society and how does art influence humanity in general.This movie brought us a dynamic conversation, we shared various ideas on the themes and enjoyed each others' companion and great thoughts.CLE movie club meets every other Tuesday night from 7:00-8:00. We'll announce the movie to watch in advance in our QQ group. Enjoy the movie by yourself and come to join our meetings on Tuesday. We are looking forward to seeing you next time.


Writing Center Workshop: “The Art of Revision and Editing”

The CLE Writing Center continues our Writing Workshop Series this week with Xiao Shi presenting on the topic of “The Art of Revision”. Open to anyone across the SUSTech community, this workshop will focus on the imperative task of any good writer: Revision. Taking a practical approach, Ms. Shi will view editing through a checklist method, listing the steps one should take in order to identify and fix common writing mistakes.The CLE Writing Center is committed to helping both students and staff achieve academic clarity in their writing samples, and though workshops such as this, aim to extend resource opportunities to anyone who want to take the time and effort to increase their writing potential.

TA Teaching Development Program

The TA Teaching Development Program, run in partnership with the Center for Language Education and the SUSTech Provost Office, has gotten off to a great start this semester. Instructor Matthew Jellick is working with a team of nearly 40 Teaching Assistants though an 8-week curriculum in which they discuss using English as the medium of instruction in their classroom. Touching on topics ranging from Syllabus Design to Reflective Teaching Practices, the TA's, representing 10 different schools and departments from across the university, examine their approaches within a classroom setting. This is the fourth semester the CLE has held this program, aiming to improve teaching competency across the landscape at SUSTech. We believe that learning is a continuous process and are grateful for the cross-departmental collaboration which this program fosters.


CLE Writing Center Workshop: Personal Statements

The CLE Writing Center will host two workshops, with the first one beginning this week on the topic of, “Personal Statements: Who you are a Student and as a Person”. Led my Matthew Jellick, the discussion will focus on writing of Personal Statements from the perspective of two identities, including the student and the person. Too often we inundate our statements with information about test scores, rankings, and GPA but leave out details about desire, passion, and motivation. We will take a close look at the importance of both facets.The CLE Writing Center offers one-on-one help for SUSTech students with their personal statements, while also hosting workshops each semester on different topics. We invite you to not only sign up for individualized appointments, but also to attend our workshops!

SUSTech Students Win Prizes in 2021 “FLTRP · ETIC Cup” Provincial Semifinals

The Provincial-Level Semifinals of 2021 National “FLTRP · ETIC Cup” English Writing, Reading, and Public Speaking Contests were held on November 6th, 2021 in Shaoguan University in Shaoguan, Guangdong. The contests attracted 629 students including 147 speaking contestants, 241 reading contestants, and 241 writing contestants over 66 universities in Guangdong province. A total of nine SUSTech students represented SUSTech participated in the provincial-level semifinals. Four of them won 2nd-prizes and two won 3rd-prizes.Four SUSTech undergraduates took part in the writing contests. They composed one expository essay and one argumentative essay within two hours. Zhang Zixuan finally won second prize and Zhou Sicheng won third prize. To prepare participant students for such writing contest, the Center for Language Education (CLE) provided a series of writing workshops targeting specific writing skills in the contest.Of the four SUSTech contestants in the FLTRP reading contest at the provincial level, Zhai Jinglei and Jia Shiying won second prizes. Xie Xinran, who participated in both reading and writing semi-finals this time, won third prize. To support the contestants, CLE instructors conducted several training sessions on the topic of logic fallacies, reading comprehension, and reading based writing which were open to both the contestants and other students who were interested. With the efforts of the contestants and instructors, delightful results were achieved and SUSTech has made one step further in FLTRP contest.  For the speaking contest, Liu Siqi and Zheng Fujia participated in the speaking semifinal. Liu Siqin won 2nd prize. During the past five months, the speaking contest preparation team consisting of six CLE instructors has provided intensive training focused on both impromptu speaking and prepared speeches. Cui Junhao and Xiao Yiting, who participated in last year's speaking semifinal were also invited to share their experience with the two contestants, which proved to be very helpful. Since May 2021, the CLE has organized 2021 "FLTRP · ETIC Cup” English Preliminary Contests on campus and offered our students full support. Fourteen CLE instructors formed three contest preparation teams to organize three contests respectively and coach the contestants for the provincial-level semifinals. It's the second time SUSTech students have signed up for all the three contests organized by FLTRP, and their trip to Shaoguan was a big success. All contestants appreciated the great learning opportunity. The CLE is proud of the contestants and the progress they have made at SUSTech. The CLE together with the SUSTech students will never stop our steps towards excellence!


CLE Movie Club discusses “Arrival”

How might you begin to communicate with aliens from another universe? On November 9th, the CLE Movie Club discussed the film “Arrival” (2016). A main idea in the film is the importance of language in culture, and the importance of culture in language. The club discussed this and many other aspects of the film.The CLE Movie Club is an English conversation activity. The participants meet regularly during the semester to discuss movies and the ideas they contain. Everyone watches the film separately before the meeting, which is held in the Yidan Library. The Club is led by CLE faculty Rongrong Dong and Al Evans. Both are dedicated film buffs who are happy to share their love of movies.On this occasion, the club discussed language and culture, fate versus free will, linear time versus circular time, and the societal disorder that comes with natural disasters. All of these ideas appeared in the film. We also compared gender representation in this film with those of previous films, and concepts of time as compared to alternate time scenarios in films from earlier in the term. Come join the CLE Movie Club next time to discuss the German film “The Lives of Others” (2006). That will be on Tuesday, November 23rd. You can scan the code below to join our QQ group.

EAP Workshop: “The Counterargument in Your Academic Writing”

Our EAP Workshop Series will continue this week with Xiao Shi presenting on the topic of “What About the Other Side: The Counterargument in your Academic Writing”. Critical thinkers, whether it be for writing essays, defending an argument, or simply thinking about everyday topics, need to be able to understand the other side, not only focusing on one position, as there are two sides to everything. In this workshop we will analyze the correct way to write about this in an argumentative essay, giving credence to differing positions.The Center for Language Education EAP Workshop Series addresses issues which are pertinent to both students and faculty across the SUSTech academic landscape. And, going forward we will continue to provide learning opportunities, hoping that the community of learners takes advantage of them to move forward towards more sustainable and refined writing practices.


TA Teaching Development Program

Each semester for the past two years, the Center for Language Education, in partnership with the SUSTech Provost Office, has hosted a TA Teaching Development Program for qualified Teaching Assistants at our university. Taught over the course of an intensive eight weeks, instruction ranges on topics from “Traits of a Good Teaching Assistant” to “Collaboration with Course Instructors”. Addressing practical issues within the classroom, and highlighting innovative approaches to teaching pedagogy, the TAs are able to analyze, discuss and apply good practices to their own teaching methodology.Course instructor, Matthew Jellick, has been training Teaching Assistants for the past two years, helping to develop their English instructional skills through classroom competency. Both the Provost Office and the CLE recognize “teaching as a language” and that the future of education at SUSTech will depend on the teaching development skills of TAs across different departments.We look forward to another successful semester working together, as we continue to strive for teaching and learning excellence!

“Easy Reading for Fluency and Culture” Seminar Is A Page Turner

Al Evans from the Center for Language Education delivered a seminar on “Easy Reading for Language and Culture.” The event on November2 highlighted the theories of Stephen Krashen, Paul Nation, and others. The audience learned how to apply these language acquisition theories in simple ways to expand their language abilities through reading.Evans shared results from his own classes, as well as significant research in the field of “Extensive Reading.” Al’s seminars are always characterized by interactivity, and the audience participated start to finish in small conversation as well as question and answers about a variety of topics related to reading.Evans also shared a team project underway with SUSTech Librarian Lu Tao and the CLE’s Doctor Rongrong Dong. Together, the three have been working to expand the library of easy readers for students of different reading levels. The project includes a system to level books to help readers easily find one that is right for them. A high point of the evening was when Mr. Evans shared pulled out some of the new titles which were not yet available through the library.The Workshops @Residential Colleges is a regular series of talks organized by Professor Adrian Xu at the Center for Language Education. Check your email and classroom posters for updates and upcoming workshops. 


Shut Up and Write


EAP Workshop: “Signposting: Navigating Your Writing Journey”

This week's EAP Workshop will be hosted by Chu Yu, discussing “Signposting” and the importance this technique has on the organization and structure of your academic writing. When writing, it is important to give directions to your reader, and through Signposting, we are able to alert them to transitional phrases, counterarguments, or even paragraph shifts.Chu Yu bring with her extensive experience in academic writing, and through this workshop, will be able to highlight not only this particular issue, but larger topics which also play a role in constructing a good essay. As always, the EAP Workshops are open to the entire student community of learners across the SUSTech campus, and we look forward to seeing you attend and grow through continued learning…


CLE WORKSHOPS @RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES #4: Easy Reading for Language and Culture


SUSTech Global Language Day 2021: SUSTechers learned "I love SUSTech" in 12 Languages

The first SUSTech Global Language Day was held in the open space between Lecture Hall 1 and SUSTech Center Cafeteria on October 27th. The event was hosted by the Center for Language Education of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences and attracted around 1,000 participants. SUSTech Global Language Day 2021 highlighted SUSTechers love for the University. It celebrated the many different languages on campus and saluted the diversity of our SUSTech community. Through this occasion, students and faculty learned how to say “I love SUSTech” in twelve different languages, including English, Mandarin, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Hungarian, Italian, Latin, Cantonese, German, Japanese, and Arabic. To encourage the learning and sharing of languages on SUSTech campus, other basic phrases of these twelve languages were taught as well. SUSTech Global Language Day seeks to encourage sharing among different languages and cultural backgrounds, to promote a more international atmosphere at the university, and to foster a more diverse campus culture.


2021 SUSTech Global Language Day

You are cordially invited to attend the 2021 SUSTech Global Language Day. WHEN Wednesday, October 27th 12:00-14:00 pm WHERE The open space between Lecture Hall 1 and SUSTech Center Cafeteria This event encourages the learning and sharing of languages on SUSTech campus. Come and meet students and faculty from around the world. Learn how to say “I love SUSTech” in 12 different languages and win a special prize! We sincerely look forward to seeing you.

SUSTech School of Medicine Ceremony & Presentations

The Center for Language Education, in partnership with the SUSTech School of Medicine, recently held a Ceremony and Presentation for the Faculty Teaching Development Program. Throughout the evening, the hard work and dedication of the Medical School faculty was celebrated, with speeches and brief presentations. Professor Xing Mingzhao, the Dean of the Medical School opened the evening with a speech highlighting the importance of this program and how it benefits everyone involved, from the doctors to the teachers to the students. Dr. Li Yuan, the Director of the Center for Language Education spoke to the importance of empowering teachers and students through constructive classroom teaching, and how we act as multipliers, affecting those who learn from our strong teaching practices. Dr. Zhang Wenyong, the Deputy Dean of the School of Medicine addressed the collaborative nature of the two departments, a partnership which has now spanned three years, and benefited not only the Medical School, but likewise, three SUSTech Affiliated Hospitals. Finally, Matthew Jellick, the instructor of the program, spoke about the objectives of the course, including everything from Syllabus Design to Being a Reflective Teacher, a cyclical endeavor which promotes continued growth on behalf of everyone involved. Two doctors who took the course also gave inspired presentations, including Professor Dr. Qin Jianqiang and Associate Professor Dr. Du Changzheng. They both spoke about the benefits of the topics covered, and in turn, how they apply them to their classroom instruction, welcoming the challenges of being a constructive teacher who takes risks in how they approach teaching. While this ceremony marks the conclusion of our third successful year of the program, as teachers, we understand that the teaching and learning opportunities we discussed are ongoing, and that good teaching practices never end, but rather, keep developing. Going forward, we understand our role as multipliers of quality education, and look forward to the challenges which lay ahead in our quest for continued growth...


EAP Workshop: "Achieving Clarity in Academic Writing"

Continuing the EAP Workshop series, this week, Dr. Ma Ji will be presenting on the topic of "Achieving Clarity in Academic Writing".  This important issue will deal with how you, as a writer can get get your message across so that the reader has a clear understanding of what you are conveying, avoiding unintended ambiguity or confusing sentence structure.While this workshop will be geared towards academic writing, it is open to the entire community of learners at SUSTech, as everyone can gain from the ideas shared and topic discussed, and we look forward to hopefully seeing you there...

EAP Workshop: "Achieving Clarity in Academic Writing"

Continuing the EAP Workshop series, this week, Dr. Ma Ji will be presenting on the topic of "Achieving Clarity in Academic Writing".  This important issue will deal with how you, as a writer can get get your message across so that the reader has a clear understanding of what you are conveying, avoiding unintended ambiguity or confusing sentence structure. While this workshop will be geared towards academic writing, it is open to the entire community of learners at SUSTech, as everyone can gain from the ideas shared and topic discussed, and we look forward to hopefully seeing you there...


School of Medicine Faculty Teaching Development Program Ceremony and Presentations

The Center for Language Education, in partnership with the SUSTech School of Medicine, is proud to host the Ceremony and Presentations for the Faculty Teaching Development Program. Held during each Summer Term, faculty and staff from the SUSTech School of Medicine take part in an intensive program aimed at improving their teaching skills as they relate to topics ranging from Using English as the Medium of Instruction to Teacher Reflection, and from Syllabus Design to Curriculum Development. Working with CLE instructor, Matthew Jellick, these extremely motivated and highly skilled teachers discuss and examine innovative and sustainable approaches to teaching, and how we can construct a learning environment which encourages dynamic educational opportunities for everyone involved. We will celebrate the hard work and accomplishments from our program, and looking forward, talk about how we can continue to implement these ideas into our classrooms...

EAP Workshop Series

Each semester the EAP Program hosts a series of Workshops aimed at developing the academic communiation skills for the entire SUSTech community of learners. In our third year of implementing such programming, we are happy to announce this semester's EAP Workshop Series, which will begin on Thursday, October 21st, and continue for four consecutive weeks.In an effort to encourage both students and staff to attend, we have created the "EAP Workshop Passport" for this semester, which is a pamphlet listing the specific topics of each workshop. Students and staff are encouraged to pick one up at the workshops and get them stamped each week.The first Workshop will be hosted by EAP Course Coordinator, Matthew Jellick, and will focus on the topic of "Communication and Coherence" and as is the case with all workshops, will be held in Teaching Building 1, Room 108 from 12:30pm - 1:30pm on Thursday.We look forward to your attendance, as we collaborate for the continued advancement of academic communication skills for everyone on campus...


CLE Workshops @Residential Colleges Returns for 2021 Fall Semester

Two sessions of CLE Workshops @Residential Colleges 2021 Fall series were successfully launched in September. The first workshop, entitled “CET 4&6 Training,” was delivered by Xing WEN on September 15th . This workshop was aimed at those who have zero knowledge of CET-4 and will take this test in December 2021 at SUSTech. During the session, WEN Xing introduced the CET-4 and CET-6 test format and procedure. Essential skills for a standardized English test as well as some test-taking strategies were shared to help students make good use of the authentic past CET tests and practice each section independently.   Another themed lecture “Vocabulary Building in Listening: Enhance Independent Vocabulary Learning” was delivered by Prof. HU Yuxiu on September 24th. This workshop focused on raising students’ awareness of their vocabulary gap in listening. Professor HU then led participants to identify the gap, to acquire new vocabulary through awareness gap filling and note taking, and finally to make passive vocabulary active. Those attending the lecture showed great interest in the topic. They interacted actively throughout the well-designed tasks by Prof. HU. This lecture provided good opportunities for students to extend the knowledge of their actual vocabulary and acquire new words of the target language in listening. The CLE@ Residential Colleges Workshops 2021 Fall series cover a variety of topics. Please stay tuned for our upcoming activities in October!

Mid-Autumn Festival Celebration with International Colleagues and Students at SUSTech

The Mid-Autumn Festival Themed Event: “Make Mooncakes and Learn Chinese” was held in the Chinese Restaurant in campus on September 17th. It was hosted by the Center for Language Education of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences together with SUSTEch Global. A group of international colleagues and students participated in this themed event and gathered together to celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival. Prof. ZHENG Chunmiao, the Vice Provost of Global Strategies and Director of SUSTech Global, attended the event and delivered a speech. He welcomed the international colleagues and students and encouraged them to actively integrate into the SUSTech community. Dr. LI Yuan, the Director of the Center for Language Education, Ms. LONG Jin, the Associate Director of SUSTech Global, and the CLE and SUSTech Global office staff attended this special event. This Mid-Autumn Festival Themed Event also served as the special starting session of the CLE Staff Chinese course. Its instructor, Dr. ZHU Wenhui, designed the situated learning activities, which was well received by the participants. In an active learning environment, the international faculty and students got to know the origin and history of the Mid-Autumn Festival and learned the related Chinese language. As a highlight of the event, all participants made their own mooncakes with the invited SUSTech chef’s instruction and tasted their first hand-made mooncake. In this special themed event, the international faculty and students of SUSTech celebrated the Mid-Autumn Festival, learned Chinese in the real context, and experienced the traditional Chinese festival culture.


English Corner Returns for Fall 2021

The Zhiren College English Corner welcomed new students and returning students with meetings in two consecutive weeks at the beginning of the semester. On Friday, September 10th, a special English Corner for 1st year students only was held in the Zhiren College Activity Room. A team of Zhiren student leaders designed the activities and hosted the evening. A full room of over 40 students joined for the evening and engaged in English speaking opportunities for 2 hours. The following week, on the 17th of September, English Corner celebrated the Mid-Autumn festival with activities designed along the holiday theme. A highlight of the evening was a “lantern” puzzle or crossword puzzle. This was followed by Turtle Soup, a storytelling and guessing activity. Both events were attended and supported by CLE faculty and staff, including Anthony Rendon, Conrad Herrera, Stephen Pellerine, Ted Campbell, and Charlotte Luo. They presented news on upcoming events and activities, as well as taking part in discussions, conversations, and managing students. As usual, the English Corner faculty advisor from the CLE, Al Evans, also attended and supported the student leaders. English Corner is a consistently popular English conversation activity at SUSTech. The special schedule of two consecutive weeks is a departure from its standard routine of twice a month. The next English Corner will be on October 15th. Please join us after the holiday break for fun English conversation!

Latin club au debut

A new Latin Club was launched on the evening of September 15th, sponsored by SUSTech’s Center for Language Education. During the first meeting, our students showed great interest in this living archaic language. Led by Yang Luo, the first session of the CLE Latin Club focused on the introduction to the Latin language and the Roman world. The meeting built a connection between this classical language and its wide use in medical science and other fields that SUSTech students will pursue in their academic and career development. During the evening, a comprehensive introduction was followed by an interactive discussion in which all participants expressed their interests and enthusiasm in learning Latin, one of the most influential languages in history and science. In the coming sessions of the CLE Latin Club this semester, the following topics will be covered: ● September 29th: Into the Roman world Geography and History ● October 13th: Medical Terminologies I (Hippocrates code) ● October 27th: Roman politics: Special topics on the Gracchi brothers (A fallen republic)/Bread and Circuses (A corrupted Empire) ● November 10th: Medical Terminologies II (Hippocrates code continued) ● November 24th: Drama, mythology and literature in the Roman world ● December 8th: Guest Speakers (Elizabeth Fisher and Katherine Wasdin) ● December 22th: Real Latin (Let’s read de Bello Gallico)    


Opening for Latin Club: an intro to ancient language

In 2021 Fall, SUStech Center for Language Education will open a Latin club to expand the selection of foreign languages for any students or faculty members who wish to learn this famous “ancient language”. Starting September 15th, Latin Club will meet bi-weekly on (every other) Wednesday at 7 p.m. There are eight sessions and various topics including basic linguistics of the Latin language, Roman history and culture, medical terminologies, and even a guest speaker if possible. The diverse topics would open more possibilities to students and faculty members from different fields, hoping to present a platform for interdisciplinary studies. The club aims to provide an introduction to this sophisticated ancient language as well as to help students build their English vocabulary through Latin stems and roots. Learning Latin would be extremely beneficial for anyone who wishes to pursue further in English studies, law schools, and medical schools. Latin Club welcomes all! Perge Fortiter! Time: starting at 7 p.m Sep 15th, 2021; bi-weekly Wednesdays Location: Teaching Building 1 Room 303

2021 Fall CLE One-on-One Language Services Start from September 6th

In 2021 Fall, SUStech Center for Language Education will continue to offer the “one-on-one” Language Help Services with a commitment to provide ongoing language support to the SUSTech community. Program 1: Language Help Service The Language Help Service covers English writing support, speaking practice and English learning consultation, as well as Chinese language tutoring for international students and staff. SUSTech members are welcome to reserve a 25-minute face-to-face session with a CLE faculty member. This semester we will continue to offer more than 60 sessions per week, beginning in Week 1 (September 6th). You can use our Online Booking System to book appointments with our faculty. (Please see the instruction in https://cle.sustech.edu.cn/?support=%e6%b5%8b%e8%af%95%e6%95%b0%e6%8d%ae3.)   Program 2: The Weekly Conversation (Special LHS Session) As a special program of the CLE's LHS this semester, the Weekly Conversation provides an integrated speaking practice on different topics, which will build the participants' overall English proficiency and can help with TOEFL/IELTS test performance. Time: Monday from 12:30 to 13:30 Venue: Room 307, Teaching Building 1 No reservation is needed for this service. Please see the accompanying poster for specific topics being addressed each week.


CLE Writing Center: Fall, 2021

In our continuous aim to offer writing support to the SUSTech community of learners, the Center for Language Education will continue to offer help for both students and staff through the Writing Center. In out third year, the Writing Center is conducted one-on-one for an on-needs basis with anyone on campus seeking assistance for any and all of their writing needs. SUSTech students and staff can pick their own day, time, and location to meet, by sending an email request to either Matthew Jellick (matthewj@sustech.edu.cn) or Xiao Shi (shix@sustech.edu.cn) , introducing themselves and briefly explaining their subject matter. In addition to individualized appointments, the Writing Center teachers, Matthew and Xiao, will also host two workshops during the semester, highlighting different aspects as they pertain to "Personal Statements" as well as "The Art of Revision". More information about the details will follow. With both one-on-one tutorial sessions as well as expanded workshops, the Writing Center looks forward to working with the SUSTech Community of Learners over the course of the upcoming semester as we highlight the power of words, and how the lasting impact they have through writing...

The Center for Language Education Launches its Pre-Sessional Program for the 2021 New Students

On August 27th, 1147 new undergraduate students and 1419 postgraduate students attended the 2021 SUSTech English Placement Test, held by the Center for Language Education. The English Placement Test is the prologue to students’ academic life at SUSTech. Based on this, their English performance on the Gaokao, and SUSTech computer-based exams, they are placed into one of three levels. Students at different levels will get tailored support in small-sized classes to develop their communication and academic skills in a global context. Following the placement test, SUSTech’s Center for Language Education launched its one-week pre-sessional program for the new students August 30th. The annual week-long intensive pre-sessional program aims to provide students with key learning skills and study strategies that will help them succeed at SUSTech, a promising research university with a global outlook, where English is one of the key languages for instruction and learning. The pre-sessional program prepares the freshmen for a steady progression to a continuous improvement of their skills in terms of English language, communication in academic contexts, learning and self-management at university. A face-to-face speaking proficiency test is conducted as a warm-up on the first day, followed by an analytical report of their English proficiency. Language in an Academic Setting is the theme of the second day. Academic Vocabulary on the third day will familiarize students with the style of academic language. The main focus of the fourth day is practical and productive language skills needed for campus life, such as seminar skills, presentation skills and email etiquette. The program will be concluded with a section of self-management skills on the fifth day, including the management of time, study space, study load, and motivation. The skills-based pre-sessional training program in English is designed to ensure a good start for new students’ academic success at SUSTech. The CLE will support students’ academic growth over the course of their study at SUSTech.


EAP Workshop Series: Fall, 2021

The English for Academic Purposes (EAP) team will continue to offer a series of Workshops this semester. Beginning in October (after the National Holiday), each EAP teacher will offer a Workshop focusing on a specific detail of Academic Writing, helping to underscore many of the topics addressed within our EAP classes. But although the workshops are presented by EAP teachers, they are open to the entire SUSTech community of learners, as academic writing is a topic which everyone has a vested interest in.More details will follow as the time grows closer, including weekly updates and reminders. Until then, we look forward to the start of a great semester in EAP and then expanding our reach though the series of workshops... 

CLE Instructor Presents at Conference

CLE Instructor, Matthew Jellick, recently presented at the Global English Education China Assembly. Matthew's topic was on, "Pedagogical Approaches to Book Clubs" in which he highlighted his experiences over the course of the past five years at SUSTech, hosting Staff English Book Clubs. Looking at things from the perspective of both teachers as well as students, the roles of "Facilitator" (teacher) and "Ownership" (students) were addressed, underscoring the the differences from a traditional classroom setting. Book Clubs offer a sustainable and interactive way to encourage language development and since arriving at SUSTech, Matthew has hosted seven different Book Clubs for Faculty and Staff. Working in an arena where topics such as gender identity, economic mobility, and racial divides are discussed, the power of Book Clubs reaches beyond topics of core curriculum and encompasses social issues which affect each of us. The presentation to a large audience at the conference acted as a platform to encourage others to use this innovative tool in their own teaching context.


Situated Language Learning: 2021 Summer Staff Chinese Shenzhen Museum Trip

The 2021 Summer Shenzhen Museum Trip organized by the Center for Language Education (CLE) was successfully completed on July 13th. The trip acts as an important conclusion for our Staff Chinese Summer Program after three weeks of intensive Chinese language learning. Our students in the course, a group of SUSTech international staff, visited the Shenzhen Museum of History and Folk Culture and Shenzhen Museum of Ancient Art. The visit offered an opportunity to explore Chinese history and culture and to practice new language structures, vocabulary, and idiomatic expressions in an immersive experience that touched on multiple aspects of Shenzhen’s local history. The group was organized and led by CLE Chinese program coordinator, Wenhui Zhu. Inside the Shenzhen Museum of History and Folk Culture, the group visited four exhibitions: Ancient Shenzhen, Modern Shenzhen, “Shenzhen’s Reform and Opening Up History,” and Shenzhen Folk Culture. The collections displayed in these exhibitions touched on various aspects of Shenzhen city history and folk culture. In the Shenzhen Museum of Ancient Art, three collections impressed the international staff, including, “Collection of Painting and Calligraphy”, “Ancient Bronze Exhibition”, and “Ancient Ceramic Exhibition”. From 4,500-year-old pottery to Buddhist relics, this rich cultural heritage reflects the multiple connections, exchanges and encounters that have enriched the history of Shenzhen ad Guangdong throughout the centuries. During the visit, the international staff were attracted by the multiple facets of Shenzhen history and development, displayed in the rich collection of artworks, archaeological reports, paintings, and daily life objects.   The visit to the museums provides a direct sense of the long history of China, the great achievements and the continuous connections through trade and exchange of ideas between the east and west. This full day venture gives the class a great opportunity not only to practice Chinese language in context, but also to explore the history of the city and communities that extend their knowledge of Chinese culture. Situated learning extends their book-learning of Chinese language, broadens their understanding on China, and serves as a bridge for them to communicate and enjoy their lives in China.   Congratulations to our international staff for their successful complete of the Chinese program this semester! The Center for Language Education is committed to serving language learning needs of the SUSTech community and will continue to facilitate the cultural exploration of the international staff. News provided by Dr. Wenhui Zhu, Center for Language Education

Medical School Faculty Development Program

For the third summer in a row, the Center for Language Education will work with the SUSTech School of Medicine on an intensive four-week summer teaching program. With a focus on using English as the Medium of Instruction, CLE Instructor, Matthew Jellick, will work with 15 doctors from the medical school on developing and refining their teaching practices, including topics ranging from writing course objectives, conducing classroom management, and even the importance of peer observations.This Medical School Faculty Development Program aims to integrate good teaching practices into the classroom, and working with the outstanding doctors from different specialties underscores the importance of constructive pedagogy which benefits both teachers and students alike. The CLE is grateful to the School of Medicine for their renewed partnership and cooperation on programs such as this, and we look forward to continued success!


TA Teaching Demonstrations

Each semester, the TA Teaching Development Program culminates in a week-long series of Teaching Demonstrations, presented by SUSTech Teaching Assistants. This semester, we held another successful program, with 25 different TAs from nine different Schools and Departments across the university giving outstanding Teaching Demonstrations, using English as the Medium of Instruction. During each presentation, those in the audience not only observed, but provided feedback; an important element which allows for continued development on behalf of all the participants. In addition to peer feedback, a number of professors attended as well, including Dr. Oscar Dahlsten from the Department of Physics, Dr. Jana Hertz, Dr. Raul Ures and Dr. Chen Yimao from the Department of Mathematics, and Dr. Zhang Wenyong from the School of Medicine. All were proud of the demonstrations they observed, a testament to the continued growth and development of young teachers at SUSTech. This was the third celebration of the TA Teaching Development Program, hosted by CLE Instructor, Matthew Jellick, and we are already looking forward to facilitating sustained teaching skills next semester with and extended program as well.   Department of Mathematics   School of Medicine  

The 8th "League Cup" Undergraduate College English Writing Competition in Guangdong Province

The 8th “League Cup” Undergraduate College English Writing Competition, jointly hosted by Teaching Guidance Committee (English Major sub-committee) of Guangdong Province and Teaching Guidance Committee (Non-English Major sub-committee) of Guangdong Province, together with China College English Writing Teaching Alliance, was held in April 2021. The first-round of the competition was university based and conducted online and the winners will attend the provincial final competition on behalf of the university. Xu Siqun on behalf of the Center for Language Education (CLE) organized the 8th "League Cup" Undergraduate College English Writing Competition inside the SUSTech. Excellent SUSTech undergraduate students participated the contest with their talent in creative writing. There were 11 prize winners in this challenging contest and they all demonstrated great English writing competence during the competition. The outstanding prize went to Hu Hongwei. The first prize winners were Ma Huijin and Qiu Bingzheng. The second prize went to Wang Yitong, Li Jiahui and Zhou Zhiyue. Our third prize winners were Zhang Yiyang, Cui Jinyi, Jian Tianlan, Wu Zhan and Kuang Xiaoyu. Students of outstanding prize and first prize winners will have the opportunity to represent SUSTech in the final competition of Guangdong Province.


TA Teaching Demonstrations


Staff English Book Club: "Factory Girls" by Leslie Chang

We are happy to announce the eighth incarnation of the SUSTech Staff English Book Club!  Hosted by CLE Assistant Director, Matthew Jellick, this summer we will be reading Factory Girls, written by Leslie Chang.  As with all seven previous versions of the Book Club, our discussions will focus on topics of gender inequality, economic dichotomies, and cultural sensitivity; issues which affect us all, whether we want to admit it or not. The author, Leslie Chang, is the wife of Peter Hessler, who was the author of our very first Book Club back in the Spring of 2017, when we read River Town.  Again, we will aim to keep the strong and in-depth discussion going, giving credence to the power of book clubs and the topics addressed which oftentimes are not part of core curriculum or office banter. The SUSTech Staff English Book Club is a testament to the power of words and the strength of a passionate community of learners!


Summer Writing Center

In an effort to continue to offer writing support to the SUSTech community of learners, the Center for Language Education will continue to offer help for both students and staff through the Writing Center. In its third year, the Writing Center is conducted one-on-one for an on-needs basis with anyone on campus seeking assistance for any and all of their writing needs. SUSTech students and staff can pick their own day, time and location to meet, by sending an email request to Matthew Jellick: matthewj@sustech.edu.cn, introducing themselves and briefly explaining their subject matter. Writing is an academic as well as creative output method for communicating with others, and the CLE Writing Center looks forward to working with you along your journey of self-expression.  

2021 SUSTech English Contests & "FLTRP · ETIC Cup” English Preliminary English Contests

In May 2021, the Center for Language Education (CLE) held university-wide English public speaking, reading, and writing contests, which are also the preliminary English contests of 2021 "FLTRP · ETIC Cup.” Reading Contest On Saturday, May 15th, CLE held the SUSTech English Reading Contest on campus. 43 SUSTech undergraduate and postgraduate students participated in the competition. The 110 minutes contest was a comprehensive examination on contestants’ reading broadness and skills, including logical thinking and reasoning, reading for understanding, information processing and judgment. SUSTech students demonstrated strong English reading ability in this challenging contest. Among dozens of excellent “readers”, 18 students won the SUSTech English Reading Contest. The prize winners of the 2021 “FLTRP· ETIC Cup” English Reading Contest will be announced later after CLE confirms with the FLTRP preliminary contest teams.   Speaking Contest On Sunday, May 16th, SUSTech students competed in a lively speaking competition on campus. Organized by CLE, this contest represents the local and preliminary level of the national competition sponsored by FLTRP. All participants delivered strong performances throughout the morning. 16 students competed to produce 7 winners. The grand prize winner was Liu Siqi, and the first prize winner was Zheng Fujia. These two will be SUSTech’s champions and represent us in the provincial level contest next semester. Second prize winners were Xu Gelei and He Shuang. Our 3rd prize winners were Jia Shiying, Shi Dengheng, and Cao Haokai.   Grand Prize Winner: Liu Siqi First Prize Winner: Zheng Fujia   Writing Contest FLTRP Preliminary Writing Contest was held on Saturday, May 23rd in Teaching Building 1 at SUSTech. The writing contest aims to select excellent writers for the further provincial and national writing contest sponsored by FLTRP. Writing contest committee chose the genre of argumentative essay as the writing task for the participant students. Students were encouraged to write their authentic ideas creatively and critically. All participants completed the essay within 90 minutes, and their writings were collected by CLE 2021 Reading Contest Committee for further grading. CLE will announce the winners for the next round contest in the early fall semester.   In the upcoming fall semester, a series of reading, speaking, and writing training workshops will be provided to prepare the preliminary winners for the provincial contest in November, 2021.  


Faculty and Staff Workplace Development Series: The Practicality of Translation

We ended our SUSTech Faculty and Staff Workplace Development Series with a presentation on "The Practicality of Translation". With a number of CLE teachers in attendance, it was Beatrice Clegg who led everyone through insight supported with examples of cultural translations of specific concepts and set phrases. Taking a look at things from a practical viewpoint, she argued that both the reasoning and exactness of translations can be flexible, while at the same time, pointing out the impression that correct and logical translations have on an extended audience, namely, those beyond campus. The Center for Language Education is dedicated to support the university's constant drive for internationalization and through workshops like this, we offer SUSTech faculty and staff ideas, guidance and support to help them understand the importance of these issues. Going forward, we will continue to offer outreach in these various areas, and hope that our suggestions are not only well-received, but implemented, too.   Translation

CLE HOSTS INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE WORKSHOP SERIES ONLINE

The Center for Language Education successfully hosted the online seminar “Theories of Intercultural Competence” on Saturday, May 22nd. The seminar was led by Helen Spencer-Oatey, Professor Emeritus of Warwick University. This was the first of three seminars in the series.   During the seminar, Professor Spencer-Oatey guided the participants through the basic concepts of intercultural competence. She included classic and prevailing theory as well as the ways in which these may best be applied. One highlight was the growing nature of the field, which is still developing its fundamental definitions, and the challenges this presents. Hosted on behalf of the Center for Language Education by Dr. Yuan Li, Director of the CLE, the seminars seek to improve awareness of and understanding of intercultural competence. After the seminars, participants will be able to apply these concepts in intercultural situations. For second language teachers in attendance, the seminar is of particular interest. Second language learners seek, by default, to interact with other cultures. The rich implications for curriculum development are clearly obvious. The next seminar in the series will occur at 3 PM on Saturday, June 5th. It is entitled “Culture, (Im)Politeness and (Un)Fair Judgements of Others.” Please join us! SUSTech faculty and staff are particularly welcome. You find more information by joining our WeChat group. Scan the code below and join our discussion.    


CLE WORKSHOPS@RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES-How to Mimic and Mirror: Academic Writing

On the afternoon of May 20th, the workshop entitled "How to Mimic and Mirror: Academic Writing" was delivered by Steve Pellerine in Teaching Building 1, Room 302. As the last session of the CLE@Residential Colleges Workshop Series this semester, Steve’s presentation focused on the concept of mirroring and its applications for language learning, which was highly related to his insight accumulated via his three master degrees in education and second language acquisition, as well as his teaching expertise in deep learning that promotes literacy development. In the workshop, aimed at first year students and students in residential colleges at SUSTech, Steve introduced the notion of mirroring that he learnt back in 1991 in his first year of psychology studies and the idea of “Fake It till You Make It” presented by Amy Cuddy in her TED Talk, to help students shape their behaviors and become aware of their technological addiction to phones and computers as well as how this addiction can affect their test scores, resulting in low GPAs. Steve stressed that once students were present in the classroom, and were more conscious of the importance of their attention, the challenge of presenting students with academic articles (self-selected) over their four-year experience at SUSTech was posed. He emphasized that if a student dipped into academic articles regularly over the course of their studies, and if they wrote regularly (self-assigned), they would be more qualified for higher level degrees, and would have more potential to contribute to the field. During the interaction part of his presentation, Steve outlined that the main aim is to help focused students realize their visions, and to help non-focused students become more focused through extensive exposure to academic literature in a field of their interests. Ultimately, students will become masters of that area of study. There were nine lectures in the CLE@Residential Colleges Workshop Series held during the spring semester, each of which covered a variety of topics co-hosted by the Center for Language Education and residential colleges. Please stay tuned for our upcoming activities next semester!  

SUSTech Faculty and Staff Workshop Development Series: The Practicality of Translation

  In our final workshop of the semester, CLE teacher, Beatrice Clegg, will discuss the topic of "The Practicality of Translation" including cultural translations of specific concepts and set phrases. Geared towards SUSTech faculty and staff, this workshop is open to the entire community of learners on campus, as the challenges and opportunities of translation, specifically between English and Chinese, will be addressed. This is the third workshop hosted this month, dealing with topics of cross-cultural communication. Now, more than ever, an open eye towards internationalization is needed in university settings, and we sincerely hope that the topics discussed can be put into practice.


Faculty and Staff Development Workshop: Culture and Communication

The SUSTech Faculty and Staff Development Workshop Series continued, with this week's topic hosted by Jennifer Hirst. Delving into "Culture and Communication", those in attendance were treated to an interactive card activity which was actually deeper than the surface level game. Brining it around to a discussion, we thought about the concepts of differing understanding and approaches to what sometimes are the same problem. Ms. Hirst also shared with us some of her own personal experience in trying to bridge cross-cultural divides which she has encountered, recounting stories from across the globe. It was a unique perspective, and one which got the audience thinking about how to be patient observers, as opposed to quick reactionaries. The Workshop Series will wrap up next week with our final one for the semester, and we look forward to a large audience, as these topics are specifically designed to help develop workplace skillsets from a global perspective.  

Writing Center Student Newspaper Article Exhibition

Over the course of the past four years, SUSTech students and staff have written articles which have been published in the local English newspaper, The Shenzhen Daily.  With topics ranging from departmental collaboration to international travel, each have shared insight from their unique perspectives across a wide range of both academic and personal issues. The Center for Language Education Writing Center, coordinated by Mathew Jellick, will host an exhibition showcasing these articles, presenting them in a light which highlights the strong writing skills and abstract thinking of their authors.  All are encourages to stop by and take a look, using it as motivation for their own writing ambitions. When: Monday, May 24th - Friday, May 28th Where: 3rd Floor Lynn Library


CLE WORKSHOPS@ RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES: Communication across Borders

On May 13th, a themed lecture "Communication across Borders" was hosted by the Center for Language Education at Teaching Building 1, Room 302. The lecturer was the CLE instructor Jenny Hirst who has worked and studied in a range of fields including Applied Linguistics, English Language Teaching, interpreting, construction, and entertainment.   Following the previous workshop given by Beatrice Daisy Clegg on intercultural communication, this session aimed to inspire students to explore two questions: What can go wrong when communicating with people from other backgrounds who do not share a culture and a language, and what strategies can we employ to communicate better with others with a different background to us. Jenny explored the questions with examples of how factors such as history, time, food, collective/ individual responsibility, domestic rules and classroom rules.   Those attending the lecture showed great interest in the topic. They interacted actively throughout the talk and shared their own thoughts on why they think misunderstandings occur in cross-cultural contexts. Students increased the knowledge and deepened their understanding of some issues related to communication across borders. This lecture provided a great chance for them to improve their competence to appreciate cultures and build a foundation for their lifelong learning. The CLE@ Residential Colleges Workshops cover a variety of topics co-hosted by the CLE and residential colleges this semester. Please stay tuned for our upcoming activities!

CLE WORKSHOPS @ RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES: HOW TO MIMIC AND MIRROR: ACADEMIC WRITING


SUSTech Faculty and Staff Workplace Development Series: Culture and Communication

Our SUSTech Faculty and Staff Workplace Development Series continues this week, with CLE teacher, Jennifer Hirst, presenting on the topic of "Culture and Communication". Within her interactive presentation, potential issues strategies to avoid confusion and conflict will be addressed, looking at things from different perspectives, with discussion from different sides. This particular workshop aims to enhance cultural awareness, and provide possible tips in how to deal with cross-cultural dichotomies which may exist in an international context. All are welcomed to attend, and we look forward to seeing you there!

Faculty and Staff Development Workshop: Practical Email Writing

The CLE began its Faculty and Staff Development Workshop Series this week, with Matthew Jellick presenting on the topic of "Practical Email Writing". About 125 students and staff from across SUSTech attended the two workshops (one held at lunch, and other in the afternoon) to learn about "Email Etiquette" including everything from the Subject Line to the Signature Line. Examples were shared, including timing, attachments and links. The personalization of email writing, and how that goes to set a tone for the communication, with emails being a request for information, not a demand for anything. The CLE Faculty and Staff Development Workshop Series will continue every Thursday for the remainder of the semester. Practical Email Writing


CLE Movie Club: Interstellar success!

The CLE Movie Club completed its spring semester activities on May 11 with a discussion of the 2014 movie “Interstellar.” At their usual Yidan Library meeting room, the group enjoyed a lively discussion in English about the characters and events of the film. The club also looked at the science in the film and its accuracy. The soundtrack by Hans Zimmer received a special mention, as did the poem featured in the film: “Do not go gentle into that good night,” by Dylan Thomas. The club is an opportunity for those who want to practice their English. Members first watch the selected film on their own. Notes with a few discussion questions are provided by the leaders to help the members prepare. During a discussion, people frequently leave the notes and introduce their own topics. The preparation and free discussion means no high level of English is required. The group meets twice weekly during the semester. This was the 6th film of the semester and the 24th film overall for the CLE Movie Club. Co-leaders Rongrong Dong and Al Evans work at the Center for Language Education at SUSTech. Their goal is to expand options for English conversation at SUSTech while pursuing a shared love of movies. Preparations are already in progress for the fall. CLE Movie Club will meet once during the summer. The group selected “The Mule” (2018) to discuss during the summer session. Join us for the discussion! Scan the code below to join our group. See you then!

CLE WORKSHOPS@ RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES: INTERCULTURAL AWARENESS AND COMMUNICATION

On April 22nd, the Center for Language Education and Zhiren College jointly organized a themed lecture “Intercultural Awareness and Communication”. The presenter was the CLE instructor Beatrice D. Clegg who started to teach at SUSTech in August, 2020. The lecture was so well received by the colleges and the students that Beatrice presented again at Shuren College on May 6th.     The focus of this workshop was divided into two key parts: how language affects our perceptions of self and others; and how cultural background informs attitude, personality, and worldview. Concepts for analysing intercultural communication were introduced, including R.M. Barna (1997)’s concept of six intercultural barriers: anxiety, assuming similarity instead of difference, language, ethnocentrism, stereotypes and prejudice, and nonverbal misinterpretation.     These issues were explored through examples and the students attending were asked to discuss in small groups questions such as “which language do you feel most confident in?”, “how does being a Chinese speaker affect how you think?”, and “what cultural barriers exist between you and the countries you want to visit or live in?” Through these activities students developed understanding of the issues inherent to intercultural communication as well as a deeper understanding of the role language plays in our perception of reality. The CLE@Residential Colleges Workshops cover a variety of topics co-hosted by the CLE and residential colleges this semester. Please stay tuned for our upcoming activities!


CLE Workshops @ Residential Colleges: Communication Across Boarders


Faculty and Staff Workplace Development Workshop: Practical Email Writing

This month, the Center for Language Education will host a series of "Faculty and Staff Workplace Development Workshops" focusing on cross-cultural communication skills. The first will be hosted by Matthew Jellick, on the topic of "Practical Email Writing". We get hundreds of emails a week, and oftentimes the messages conveyed in them are ignored or not understood due to the format, content, or even timing in which they are delivered. This workshop will highlight everything from your Subject Line to your Signature Line, pointing out overlooked etiquette and how to better reach your intended audience. This series of three workshops taking place every Thursday in May is designed to address practical written and oral communication skills for SUSTech faculty and staff, improving the internationalization of our campus.


CLE WORKSHOPS@RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES: INTERCULTURAL AWARENESS AND COMMUNICATION


Writing Center Workshops: Writing About Graphs

The CLE Writing Center Workshop series concluded this week with Albert Evans presenting on the topic of "Writing About Graphs: Success in Essays and Standardized Tests".  In particular, examples from IELTS were shared, and the systemic process students should use with both analyzing and writing about graphs for this test.  In comparison, students were also giving tips and insight into the differences when writing for academic essays, and how they can identify the question, then explain it in a logical and critical way. Although the Writing Center Workshop Series has come to an end, the Writing Center itself still remains open to all students and staff at the university, and we are happy to help out with writing support, on everything from essays to standardized tests!


Writing Center Workshop: Writing About Graphs

  The CLE Writing Center Workshops continue this week with Albert Evans presenting on the topic of "Writing About Graphs". This approach will help students in both essay writing and standardized testing, with an introduction to basic methods for writing about graphs as well as elements on how to approach Task 1 for the IELTS test. Graph writing is a key skill to showcase proper analysis of understanding graphs and transferring that knowledge into to a strong written response. Every Thursday at lunchtime, the CLE Writing Center continues to offer students and staff opportunities such as this workshop to help strengthen their writing skills and we encourage all to attend. Thanks, and we look forward to seeing you there!

LISTENING WORKSHOP SERIES: ACADEMIC LIFE IN ENGLISH (LECTURES/ STUDY ABROAD)


Writing Center Workshop: "Using Corpus Tools to Improve Writing Skills

  This week's Writing Center Workshop focused on "Corpus" and the extensive online resources available to help students in their research and academic writing. CLE lecturer, Dr. Xinting Zhang, provided attendees with a handout which complimented her interactive presentation, allowing the 30 students and staff in attendance to use their digital devices to navigate the complex and well-organized resources, helping to guide them by keyword, phrase and topic selection. For anyone working on advanced writing for their specific discipline, the tools provided in this workshop are invaluable! The CLE Writing Center's goal is to continue to provide the community of learners at SUSTech opportunities to increase their writing proficiency through a series of workshops. Furthermore, we are also available for one-on-one assistance to help students and staff find strength in their writing, using it as a powerful tool of expression. Corpus

CLE WORKSHOPS@RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES: EASY READING FOR LANGUAGE AND CULTURE


CLE WORKSHOPS@RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES: INTERCULTURAL AWARENESS AND COMMUNICATION


GGC5046 SUSTech Postgraduate English (A-Level) (2 credits)

SUSTech Postgraduate English course aims to provides a comprehensive approach to developing 21st century academic skills and preparing postgraduate students for participation in real-life academic and professional contexts.The overriding principle of language and skill development is engagement. Authentic, stimulating content includes compelling lectures on a range of academic topics, and allows students to experience the value of exchanging academic ideas. Focused listening tasks, personalized discussions, challenging tests, and authentic presentation assignments enable postgraduate students to explore each topic deeply.Activities in each unit are sequenced in a way that gives students increasing involvement and self-direction in mastering the academic skills they need to succeed—including listening, thinking, discussion, presentation, and academic study skills. SUSTech Postgraduate English course bridges the gap between language-focused and content-focused instruction.


GGC5046 SUSTech Postgraduate English (B-Level) (2 credits)

SUSTech Postgraduate English course aims to provides a comprehensive approach to developing 21st century academic skills and preparing postgraduate students for participation in real-life academic and professional contexts.The overriding principle of language and skill development is engagement. Authentic, stimulating content includes compelling lectures on a range of academic topics, and allows students to experience the value of exchanging academic ideas. Focused listening tasks, personalized discussions, challenging tests, and authentic presentation assignments enable postgraduate students to explore each topic deeply.Activities in each unit are sequenced in a way that gives students increasing involvement and self-direction in mastering the academic skills they need to succeed—including listening, thinking, discussion, presentation, and academic study skills. SUSTech Postgraduate English course bridges the gap between language-focused and content-focused instruction.* All new postgraduate students undertake the CLE placement test and are placed into A/B level based on their performance in the test. The Student of Level B must take online English learning courses independently via BB with proper guidance from the course instructors as a compulsory part of the course in order to meet the course requirement.

GGC5047 Advanced Academic Writing and Communication (2 credits)

This course is specifically designed for higher-level postgraduate students in natural sciences who pursue advanced academic English in international communication.“Advanced Academic Writing and Communication” is a course with several aims to develop both academic English writing skills and communicative competence in international context:·Equip students with advanced knowledge about writing academic papers in English·Develop students' ability to retrieve and utilize all kinds of literature for academic research·Develop the students' ability to publish their academic papers in international journals·Develop the students' ability to communicate in different international settings on the basis of their prepared papers·Equip students with comprehensive skills of speech communication, such as academic correspondence skills, networking skills, the practical oral skills necessary for presenting professional papers, raising and answering questions (Oral defense)


2021 “FLTRP · Guocai Cup” English Reading Writing Preliminary Contest at SUSTech


2021 “FLTRP · Guocai Cup” English Reading Preliminary Contest at SUSTech


2021 “FLTRP · Guocai Cup” English Public Speaking Preliminary Contest at SUSTech


Writing Center Workshop: Using Corpus Tools To Improve Writing Skills

The CLE Writing Center Workshops continue this week, with Dr. Xinting Zhang presenting on the topic of, "Using Corpus Tools To Improve Writing Skills". This workshop will focus on the use of entire works by a particular author on a specific topic, and how we can transfer that knowledge into our own writing. Corpus is a tool that can apply to subjects across a variety of academic fields, and Dr. Xinting will give tips and insight into how SUSTech students and staff can use this to their writing advantage. Every Thursday in April, the CLE Writing Center hosts a workshop which addresses particular issues pertaining to strong writing skills. These workshops are hosted by CLE teachers, and are open to the entire community of SUSTech students and staff. We encourage you to attend, and look forward to seeing you there!


Listening Workshop Series: Music & Movies (listen for pleasure)


Writing Center Workshop: "Greek and Latin Roots: The Building Blocks of Scientific Writing"

  The CLE Writing Center Workshops continued this week with Beatrice Clegg presenting on the topic of "Greek and Latin Roots". Seeing that SUSTech is a STEM university, this topic fit perfectly with many of the scientific writing community on campus, all of whom have a bright future. Throughout the interactive workshop, students were able to understand the "building blocks" of many commonly used scientific words, from the perspective of roots, prefixes, and suffixes, many of which come from Greek and Latin beginnings. About 40 SUSTech staff and students were in attendance, kept engaged throughout as Ms. Clegg explained with examples coupled with pictures, which underscored the handouts given to the audience. Each CLE Writing Center Workshop analyzes a unique topic as it pertains to strong writing skills, giving empowerment to those present, highlighting many important skills which makes good writers. They are held each Thursday throughout April, and will continue next week on the topic of "Using Corpus Tools to Improve Writing Skills". Writing Workshop PPT


Writing Center Workshop: "Greek and Latin Roots: The Building Blocks of Scientific Writing"

  This weeks' Writing Center Workshop will be hosted by CLE teacher, Beatrice Clegg, and deal with an important topic for STEM writers: "Greek an Latin Roots: The Building Blocks of Scientific Writing".  Throughout the presentation, insight will be given into word meaning, and how we can use the derivatives to our advantage when writing about STEM-centric topics.  Like anything, words, too, have a history, and by learning about their past, we can gain insight into the power of their meaning, and in turn, utilizing them correctly in scientific writing.  The Center for Language Education's Writing Center Workshops address interesting and important topics pertaining to the wide spectrum which encompasses strong writing techniques for all levels.  All SUSTech students and staff are encouraged to attend as we continue on our path towards increased language proficiency through writing!

Listening Workshop Series: Exam Listening Strategies & Practice


Writing Center Workshop: "Make Your Writing Flow: Understanding Coherence and Cohesion"

The CLE Writing Center Workshop continued this week with Xiao Shi presenting on the topic of "Making Your Writing Flow" through the notions of coherence and cohesion. Those in attendance saw examples of how logical formatting can aid writers in getting their message across, minimizing unnecessary phrases, and presenting their argument in an ordered sequence. SUSTech staff as well as students were in attendance, with pair-work being used to provide examples that supplemented the presentation, highlighting the importance of consistency and unity in writing. The CLE Writing Center Workshops continue throughout the month of April, hosted every Thursday at lunchtime in Teaching Building 1, Room 108. The entire community of learners across the SUSTech campus is welcomed, and we look forward to continued growth together!   Coherence & Cohesion  

Writing Center Workshop: "Make Your Writing Flow: Understanding Coherence and Cohesion"

  The CLE Writing Center Workshops continue this week with Xiao Shi presenting on the topic of "Making Your Writing Flow" where she will discuss issues pertaining to coherence and cohesion, both of which play instrumental roles in the movement of one's essay.  Logic and consistency paired with the act of creating a united entity oftentimes showcase a writers ability, highlighting the content in a meaningful and constructive way. The CLE Writing Center Workshops will continue throughout the month of April, hosted every Thursday at lunchtime in Room 108 of Teaching Building 1.  All SUSTech Staff and Students are encouraged to come, as this workshop will be geared towards all levels of writers!


CLE Movie Club: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017)

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017) is the third movie CLE movie club watched and discussed this spring semester. This fabulous award-winning film brought interesting conversations at our meeting Tuesday night March 30th. We focused on two major themes in this movie --- justice and loyalty. CLE movie lovers shared different opinions on the questions such as what is justice, are the characters’ actions justified, and who are the characters in the movie loyal to. As we were all very impressed by the three letters in the movie, we also spent time talking about our own letter writing experiences. To encourage more students attending our bi-weekly meeting, CLE movie club did a survey among club members in the past week. According to the survey, we decided to change our meeting time to every other Tuesday night from 7 to 8. CLE movie club aims to have conversations about movies with movie lovers around campus. We will announce the movie to watch one week earlier and expect you to watch it before the meeting. We are looking forward to your participation in the following meetings. To join us and receive information for the next movie, please scan the QR code below.

Writing Center Workshop: "Formal vs. Informal Writing: Who, When, Why & Where"

The CLE Writing Center Workshops began, with Writing Center Coordinator, Matthew Jellick, presenting on the topic of "Formal vs. Informal Writing". Both students and staff in attendance saw practical examples of both techniques, including letters, emails, and even text messages. Subtopics about "Who, When, Why & Where" were also addressed, as these all go to set the parameters of one's approach in either a formal or informal context. The Writing Center will continue to host workshops every Thursday at lunchtime, throughout the month of April, including next week's topic presented by Xiao Shi, on, "Make Your Writing Flow: Understanding Coherence and Cohesion". Thanks to those who attend, and we look forward to continue seeing the SUSTech community of learners at our programs! Formal vs. Informal


Writing Center Workshop: "Formal vs. Informal Writing: Who, When, Why & Where"

The CLE Writing Center Workshops began, with Writing Center Coordinator, Matthew Jellick, presenting on the topic of "Formal vs. Informal Writing". Both students and staff in attendance saw practical examples of both techniques, including letters, emails, and even text messages. Subtopics about "Who, When, Why & Where" were also addressed, as these all go to set the parameters of one's approach in either a formal or informal context.The Writing Center will continue to host workshops every Thursday at lunchtime, throughout the month of April, including next week's topic presented by Xiao Shi, on, "Make Your Writing Flow: Understanding Coherence and Cohesion". Thanks to those who attend, and we look forward to continue seeing the SUSTech community of learners at our programs!Formal vs. Informal

Writing Center Workshop: "Formal vs. Informal Writing: Who, When, Why & Where?"

The CLE Writing Center will begin a series of workshops this week, continuing every Thursday at lunchtime for the month of April. Our first one will be hosted by Matthew Jellick, and be on the topic of "Formal vs. Informal Writing", addressing skillsets associated with both, including Who, When, Why & Where. The CLE Writing Center offers one-on-one assistance to students and staff at SUSTech, and in addition, each semester, provides a series of workshops that concentrate on writing skills which cover a variety of topis. All are encouraged to attend and we look forward to seeing you there!


English Corner Continues Success: 2nd Meeting of Spring is a Hit

The second English Corner of the Spring semester was held successfully on Friday, March 19th. The event was hosted jointly by the Center for Language Education and Zhiren College. The theme was “White Day”, taken from the white chocolate event celebrated a month after Valentine’s Day in Japan and South Korea. To celebrate the occasion, participants were welcomed with chocolate made by the Zhiren Baking Room.     The active English Corner team of student leaders at Zhiren College designed three main activities that kept the crowd bubbling with discussion and conversation throughout the evening. These included the ever-popular ice-breaker, followed by two games. The second game challenged the players to sort out a story through coordinated communication and deduction.   English Corner meets every two weeks during the spring semester, bringing regular opportunities for students to practice their English skills in a social setting. The student leaders of Zhiren College create engaging and fun activities that delight all who attend. Additionally, those leaders gain experience in public speaking and event design and management. English Corner is a wonderful opportunity for growth and development for all of those who join.   Our next English Corner will be Friday, April 2nd, with a theme of April Fool’s Day. It will be held at the Zhiren College Activity Room, from 7-9PM. You can sign up by scanning the code on the poster below.  

EAP Workshop: Managing Nominalization in Academic Reading and Writing

We wrapped up our EAP Workshop Series for the Spring semester, with Dr. Li Zhuo presenting on the topic of Nominalization. Those in attendance were treated to applicable examples from the television show, "Big Bang Theory" which Dr. Li used to highlight the importance of communicative understanding. This topic can make simple ideas sound complex without really saying "anything", and from the workshop, students learned how to minimalize nominalization, focusing instead on the Who, What, Why, and Where of communication, rather than on sounding intelligent by nominalizing nouns for no purpose. Next week the Center for Language Education will switch gears and begin our Writing Center Workshops, with a series of five, taking place every Thursday throughout April. As always, these will be updated accordingly on our Website, and WeChat, so stay tuned.  


EAP Workshop: Managing Nominalization in Academic Reading and Writing

We wrapped up our EAP Workshop Series for the Spring semester, with Dr. Li Zhuo presenting on the topic of Nominalization. Those in attendance were treated to applicable examples from the television show, "Big Bang Theory" which Dr. Li used to highlight the importance of communicative understanding.This topic can make simple ideas sound complex without really saying "anything", and from the workshop, students learned how to minimalize nominalization, focusing instead on the Who, What, Why, and Where of communication, rather than on sounding intelligent by nominalizing nouns for no purpose.Next week the Center for Language Education will switch gears and begin our Writing Center Workshops, with a series of five, taking place every Thursday throughout April. As always, these will be updated accordingly on our Website, and WeChat, so stay tuned. 

CLE WORKSHOPS@RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES: HOW TO READ AN ENGLISH ESSAY

On March 18, the third CLE Workshop@Residential College, "How to Read an English Essay" was given by Prof. Jiang Xianjing, a visiting professor and expert in English language and literature at Teaching Building 1, Room 110. Xu Siqun, the English teacher from the Center for Language Education, presided over this lecture. He introduced Professor Jiang’ s achievements in the study of English literature and encouraged the students to extend their appreciation of language in English essay reading.   In the lecture, after bringing out the definition of "essay" and referring to its etymology in French and Latin, Prof. Jiang recommended a number of world-renowned essayists such as Montaigne, Bertrand Russell, Emerson and Simon de Beauvoir. He also outlined a practical approach to essay reading consisting of author profile, historical and cultural context, organization of material, identification of assumptions, allusions, figures of speech, paraphrase, and conclusion of essays.   In Q & A session, Professor Jiang Xianjing exchanged ideas with the students on how to develop strategies in reading English essays. His lecture was well received by the students. All those who were in attendance showed great interest in the upcoming activities hosted by CLE Workshops@ Residential Colleges.   There will be a series of workshops covering a variety of topics co-hosted by Center for Language Education and residential colleges this semester. we look forward to your continued attendance and participation. Don’t hesitate to join us!


EAP Workshop: Managing Nominalization in Academic Reading and Writing

Our EAP Workshops continue this week, with Dr. Li Zhuo presenting on, "Managing Nominalization in Academic Reading and Writing". This topic is one of constant discussion in academic reading and writing, affecting how students approach these skill sets, and through this workshop, Dr. Li will give insight into the importance of these words including their positive and negative attributes. The Center for Language Education continues on our path to offer the SUSTech community of learners opportunities to enhance their linguistic attainment, and this week's workshop is a perfect example of students and staff coming together to works towards a common academic goal.

EAP Workshop: Generating an Academic Title for Your Paper: Proper Grammar and Style

Our EAP Workshops continued, with Dr. Ma Ji giving a detailed presentation on "Generating an Academic Title for Your Paper", in which he illustrated both the pitfalls as well as highlights of having a good title.  Interspersing examples with humor, Dr. Ma spoke about  the power of words in a title, including proper grammar and style and how it can go to give the reader (or research panel) motivation and insight into the rest of the paper.  More than an introduction to a paper, a proper title showcases the writer's academic and linguistic merit, introducing not only the topic, but also specifics about of which will be discussed.This EAP workshop is an example of the caliber of academic writing SUSTech students, faculty, and staff are producing across campus and the Center for Language Education will continued to offer support through our series of writing workshops so as to aid in the development of this community of learners.


EAP Workshop: Generating an Academic Title for Your Paper: Proper Grammar and Style

Our EAP Workshops continued, with Dr. Ma Ji giving a detailed presentation on "Generating an Academic Title for Your Paper", in which he illustrated both the pitfalls as well as highlights of having a good title.  Interspersing examples with humor, Dr. Ma spoke about  the power of words in a title, including proper grammar and style and how it can go to give the reader (or research panel) motivation and insight into the rest of the paper.  More than an introduction to a paper, a proper title showcases the writer's academic and linguistic merit, introducing not only the topic, but also specifics about of which will be discussed.This EAP workshop is an example of the caliber of academic writing SUSTech students, faculty, and staff are producing across campus and the Center for Language Education will continued to offer support through our series of writing workshops so as to aid in the development of this community of learners.

CLE WORKSHOPS@ RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES: HOW TO STUDY ENGLISH AT UNIVERSITY

On March 11, the Center for Language Education and Shuli College jointly organized a themed lecture “How to Study English at University”. The speaker was Adrian (Xu Siqun), one of the most popular English teachers from the Center for Language Education. “English is a prerequisite to a bright future.” Adrian covered how to make English language the competitiveness of SUSTech students from the following three aspects: English learning, English translation, and English thinking. English as the world's most widely used language will evolve as its speakers use it in specific contexts and cultures, which will bring in the local thinking and language features. He mentioned the openness of the English language promotes its development and empowers its speakers. Adrian shared some advice on preparing for exams such as IELTS and TOEFL. Besides, he introduced the rich English learning resources offered by the CLE, such as test-preparation courses, and the individualized tutorials with high quality. Students actively interacted with Adrian after his introduction of various English learning methods. Each has developed their own plan to make English one of their strengths for their future academic and career development. The Center for Language Education is committed to making foreign language competence a competitive advantage for students’ future academic and career development. Please stay tuned for upcoming activities hosted by CLE Workshops@ Residential Colleges.


Spring 2021 TA Teaching Development Program

The Center for Language Education, in partnership with the Teaching Affairs Office, will run the TA Teaching Development Program again this semester. Held over a course of eight weeks, this program aims to enhance the effectiveness and professionalism of Teaching Assistants' instruction skills using English as the Medium of Instruction. This semester's program will begin the first week in April and continue through the end of May, with a Teaching Demonstration acting as the capstone project for the class. All SUSTech Teaching Assistants, including full-time as well as Post-Docs are encouraged to register through their respective departments. This is the third semester of the TA Teaching Development Program, and we look forward to continued success with a new cohort where we will achieve continued growth across different departments on campus, with the goal of creating a teaching and learning environment which fosters constructive development for all those involved.   TA Brochure

Spring 2021 TA Teaching Development Program

The Center for Language Education, in partnership with the Teaching Affairs Office, will run the TA Teaching Development Program again this semester. Held over a course of eight weeks, this program aims to enhance the effectiveness and professionalism of Teaching Assistants' instruction skills using English as the Medium of Instruction. This semester's program will begin the first week in April and continue through the end of May, with a Teaching Demonstration acting as the capstone project for the class. All SUSTech Teaching Assistants, including full-time as well as Post-Docs are encouraged to register through their respective departments. This is the third semester of the TA Teaching Development Program, and we look forward to continued success with a new cohort where we will achieve continued growth across different departments on campus, with the goal of creating a teaching and learning environment which fosters constructive development for all those involved.   TA Brochure


2021 Spring CLE Courses


CLE Workshops@Residential Colleges: Interactive Workshop on Learning English as a Global Language

In 2021 Spring, the CLE launched the “CLE Workshops@Residential Colleges” program. The first two workshops were held on 11th March. One of them was titled Learning English as a Global Language was designed and facilitated by Zirui Liu, who is a PhD candidate from The University of Hong Kong. Drawn from her research on sociolinguistics and English learning, she shared with students insights on English learning with a consideration of the sociolinguistic reality of English language today. In the first part of the workshop, Zirui introduced students to the two dispersals of English language and explained how English developed into a global language. Then she guided students to spot the variations in English spoken by speakers in countries where English is used as a first and second language. Prompted with a video in which Indian English speakers expressed their pride in their accent, students were engaged in critical reflection on the underlined reasons behind the diversity and how different accents came into being. Afterwards, Zirui discussed strategies to prevent and handle communication breakdown, demonstrating accommodation using the video featuring Indian speakers. Last not but least, she gave suggestions for listening and speaking practice. Her advocation of listening widely to different English varieties and aiming for intelligibility instead of accuracy in speech seemed to have aroused students’ interest, as they asked question and discussed the topics with Zirui after the workshop for about half an hour. Though the workshop was held in a big classroom, Zirui made the workshop in a big classroom a very interactive and engaging one with the support of a softward called mentimeter. Students typed their responses using their phones or laptops. And their responses were displayed simultaneously on the screen. Students have enjoyed this new form of workshop interaction and participated actively.     From March 18th to May 20th, workshops co-hosted by Center for Language Education and residential colleges will be held biweekly on Thursday afternoons, from 16:20 – 17:20. The workshops cover a variety of topics. Please mark the dates on your schedule and join us!


EAP Workshop: Generating an Academic Title for Your Paper: Proper Grammar and Style

Our EAP Workshops continue with Dr. Ma Ji presenting on, "Generating an Academic Title for Your Paper" which will be held this Thursday, March 18th at 12:30pm in Teaching Building 1, Room 108. This workshop will focus on proper grammar and style techniques for academic papers, including assignments for class as well as submissions for publication. Titles are what grabs the reader's attention and if done correctly, can motivate for continued reading and interest. The Center for Language Education offers writing workshops on Thursdays throughout the semester, and we encourage you to attend to help strengthen your writing and communication abilities.

EAP Workshop: Topic Selection: Transferring Your Passion to Presentations and Papers

The first EAP Workshop of the semester took place, with Course Coordinator, Matthew Jellick, presenting on, "Topic Selection". Over the course of an hour, SUSTech Faculty and Staff engaged in an interactive dialogue about transferring passion into presentations and papers, and how different parameters can promote or hinder these ideas. Touching upon aspects of argumentative as well as persuasive topics, those in attendance talked about how they can use research to validate their thesis, and how working with others on presentations or papers can prove both challenging and rewarding. There will be two more EAP workshops this semester, hosted by Dr. Ma Ji and Dr. Li Zhuo, respectively, and we look forward to continued attendance and participation from the SUSTech community. Slides: Topic Selection


EAP Student Article in English Newspaper

  EAP student, Michael Zhang, had his English article published in the Shenzhen Daily Newspaper.  Working in partnership with EAP teacher, Matthew Jellick, Michael wrote an article titled, "Growing up beside the Grand Canal", recounting his memories as a child, and how the canal has interwoven itself into his life, even now as a university student. Michael has interesting insights within the classroom, and these viewpoints are evident in his writing, too.  Although this particular article is not necessarily "academic", it does touch upon issues pertaining to the development of one's self, a topic which encompasses the educational and personal journeys.  This is the tenth article published between Matthew and SUSTech students and staff, and we are always open to new submissions. Link: http://www.szdaily.com/content/2021-03/10/content_24031953.htm

CLE Workshops @ Residential Colleges: Learning English as a Global Language


CLE Workshops @ Residential Colleges: How to study English at university


CLE Movie Club

Entering its 4th semester and celebrating its first anniversary, the CLE Movie Club is an English conversation activity centered on our love of film. Meeting twice every month, the club gathers in a casual format to discuss a pre-selected film. Participants watch the film on their own, and prepare for discussion in advance by using a set of materials prepared by the leaders.   In Spring 2021, the CLE Movie Club will discuss 6 films of 4 different languages. The final movie of the semester will mark the 24th film for the year. Discussions extend beyond the meetings and into the club’s QQ group, too. Regular postings of movie recommendations as well as film news are part of a normal week. The CLE’s Rongrong Dong and Al Evans co-founded and co-lead the CLE Movie Club. They see it as a way to share a common love of films with a friendly way to practice English. Participants vary in their level of ability, and the leaders always work hard to make sure everyone has good opportunities to talk. Rongrong Dong leading the discussion in the movie club   Al Evans discussed with the students in the movie club   Come and practice your English conversation with the CLE Movie Club! We meet every other Wednesday in Spring semester, from 12:50 to 13:50, in Lecture Hall 1, Room 411. Scan the QR code below to contact us.


English Corner Returns for Spring Semester

English Corner held their first meeting of Spring 2021 on Friday evening, March 5th. The Zhiren College student organizers put together a fun and entertaining plan to practice English and play games with the language.     Led by hosts Qiushi Nie and Xinyao Li, the evening began with an icebreaker about how we spent our holiday. The next activity was a game to unlock the mysteries of things we have in common. And finally, there was a Bingo-style competition in which all students interacted freely to try and win. All activities were conducted in English, providing excellent practice that was much needed after a month-long break from school. Zhiren College’s English Corner is a regular feature at SUSTech, meeting every two weeks on Friday nights. The enthusiastic student managers of the event acquire wonderful experience in organization and they also develop their leadership skills. The hosts must also challenge their public speaking skills as they welcome everyone and guide activities. They are supported in this by the Center for Language Education. The CLE’s Al Evans and Zhaoting Li provide advice on organization and encouragement in their performance.   Student leaders of the English Corner   The next English Corner will meet on Friday, March 19th. We invite you to join us!

EAP Workshop: Topic Selection: Transferring Your Passion to Presentations and Papers

In the first English for Academic Purposes (EAP) workshop of the semester, Course Coordinator, Matthew Jellick, will be presenting on "Topic Selection". This hour-long workshop will focus on the importance of choosing a good topic and how this first step can influence the entirety of your presentation or paper. In addition, ideas about transferring your passion into your work will be addressed, and how motivation can give direction to your efforts, not only for an assignment, but something which benefits you beyond the class.All students and staff from SUSTech are invited, as this workshop will focus on EAP as well as the larger context of any presentation or paper. Passion is something which leaders are able to translate into different areas of their academic and professional lives, so please attend to learn more about this motivating factor, and how it can benefit you!


EAP Workshop: Topic Selection: Transferring Your Passion to Presentations and Papers

In the first English for Academic Purposes (EAP) workshop of the semester, Course Coordinator, Matthew Jellick, will be presenting on "Topic Selection". This hour-long workshop will focus on the importance of choosing a good topic and how this first step can influence the entirety of your presentation or paper. In addition, ideas about transferring your passion into your work will be addressed, and how motivation can give direction to your efforts, not only for an assignment, but something which benefits you beyond the class. All students and staff from SUSTech are invited, as this workshop will focus on EAP as well as the larger context of any presentation or paper. Passion is something which leaders are able to translate into different areas of their academic and professional lives, so please attend to learn more about this motivating factor, and how it can benefit you!

EAP Workshops: Spring, 2021

The English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Team will host a series of three Workshops this Spring Semester. Held on Thursdays in Teaching Building 1, Room 108, from 12:30pm - 1:30pm, these workshops are open to all SUSTech students and staff, and will touch upon topics related to academic reading and writing, but which can be applied across the spectrum of academic language found in different disciplines and for different levels. All students and staff are encouraged to attend, as these workshops will not only focus on English acquisition, but the academic application of important aspects, including topic selection, working titles, and the management of nominalization. We look forward to seeing you at these workshops as we continue to support academic growth across the SUSTech campus!


EAP Workshops: Spring, 2021

The English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Team will host a series of three Workshops this Spring Semester. Held on Thursdays in Teaching Building 1, Room 108, from 12:30pm - 1:30pm, these workshops are open to all SUSTech students and staff, and will touch upon topics related to academic reading and writing, but which can be applied across the spectrum of academic language found in different disciplines and for different levels.All students and staff are encouraged to attend, as these workshops will not only focus on English acquisition, but the academic application of important aspects, including topic selection, working titles, and the management of nominalization.We look forward to seeing you at these workshops as we continue to support academic growth across the SUSTech campus!

TA Teaching Demonstrations

The TA Teaching Demonstrations have been a success so far, with 10 different Schools, Departments, and Centers providing engaging lessons for an interested audience during our first week. From the School of Medicine to the Department of Chemistry to the Arts Center, TAs from different disciplines showcased their creative approaches to classroom teaching, promoting student engagement as a way of creating a sustainable teaching and learning environment. The TA Teaching Development Program puts an emphasis on using English as the Medium of Instruction within our classrooms across the SUSTech campus, providing students and teachers authentic opportunities to develop second-language skill sets within their own discipline, opening up avenues for continued global academic success. The TA Teaching Demonstrations will continue this week, and we encourage you to come observe, participate, and give feedback. Arts Center Chemistry Department


English Mock Interview Practice

In an effort to continue to offer sustainable, practical and authentic English-language tools which are applicable to real life situations, CLE teacher Matthew Jellick will be hosting the "English Mock Interview Practice" this Spring Semester. Appointments are on an as-need basis, and are conducted in person, through a one-on-one practice scenario which will include both interview questions as well as tips and suggestions for maximum impact. Feel free to inquire or register by emailing: matthewj@sustech.edu.cn

Spring 2021 Writing Center

The Center for Language Education (CLE) is proud to offer specialized one-on-one writing assistance through the Writing Center. This platform is specially designed for students and staff working on Personal Statements, CVs or other specific writing assignments, be they academic or creative. There is no limit on the number of times students or staff can meet with Writing Center instructors and moreover, students can request a time and location which suits their schedule, aiming for flexibility in addressing campus writing needs. Throughout the semester, there will also be Writing Center Workshops which highlight critical issues pertaining to writing topics. More information about the Workshops, including topics, dates, times, and location will be shared later in the semester. For now though, please feel free to make an appointment with either Matthew or Xiao in the CLE Writing Center, and we look forward to working with you soon!


TA Teaching Demonstrations

The TA Teaching Development Program will conclude its successful semester with a series of Teaching Demonstrations.  Each Teaching Assistant will present a 15-minute demonstration on a topic related to their specific discipline, with both teacher and peer feedback given upon completion.  Throughout the program, we practiced creative, innovative, and sustainable approaches to teaching pedagogy and methodology, which will be showcased through the demonstrations led by each teaching assistant. A testament to the hard work and dedication of each, 13 different schools and departments from across SUSTech will be represented, highlighting the growth of teaching on campus. 

CLE Completes Annual Autumn Conference

The Center for Language Education successfully held its 3rd annual autumn conference on December 29th. The CLE annual conference is an opportunity for the SUSTech community to share their knowledge and skills on teaching and learning with others. The theme for our 2020 conference was “Reimagining English Education Post COVID-19.” We invited both faculty members and students to share their stories of coping with online teaching and learning during the pandemic. New ideas, effective strategies, insights, as well as positive learning outcomes were also celebrated at the conference.     Appropriate for our hard-won knowledge this year, the keynote speech was delivered by Dr. Jun Liu using video conferencing software. Dr. Liu is professor of Linguistics, Vice President and Vice Provost for Global Affairs, and Dean of international Academic Programs and Services at Stony Brook University. Dr. Liu’s keynote speech mentioned the changes in teacher cognition, teaching methodology, curriculum development, assessment and evaluation, and offered 10 predictions for the future of ELT in the coming post COVID-19 era. Dr. Jun Liu presenting via video conferencing software   Throughout the day, as the 13 featured presenters shared their discoveries and experiences, the many connections became clear. Despite the initial struggles of online teaching and learning, both our educators and students developed adaptive strategies to this new norm in our life. While we grew strengths embedding new technologies in our curriculum, we also paid more attention to the digital interaction in teaching and learning. As we all agreed content-based language education is becoming more prominent, we are also seeking inter-disciplinary collaborations within and beyond. Speakers from CLE and SUSTech students   We also invited speakers from the department of Mechanical Engineering in SUSTech, 3rd People’s Hospital of Shenzhen and Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University. They all shared valuable perspectives on teaching and learning under the era of COVID-19 and brought possible future collaboration opportunities with CLE.   Dr. Yan Wei from the Department of Mechanical Engineering in SUSTech (top), Weijia Kang from 3rd People’s Hospital of Shenzhen (middle) and Martina Dorn from Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (bottom)     The conference is a sound demonstration of the CLE’s commitment to teaching excellence. It also demonstrates a strong belief that our knowledge is created together with students, other departments, and even other institutions. Dr. Yuan Li helped to initiate the yearly conference in 2018. According to Dr. Li, the initiative of holding the CLE annual conference is to enhance the excellence of teaching and learning in English at SUSTech. The CLE, Li says, will never stop its development of a promising and excellent language center with a global vision in China.   CLE Director Dr. Yuan Li giving a speech   Group photo of the conference participants


CLE Movie Club 18th film Do the right thing (1989)

Do the right thing (1989) is the 18th film CLE movie club watched and discussed on Dec. 8th. This is also the last one we watched for this fall semester. Even though this film was created almost 30 years ago, it still speaks strongly to the audience today. Do the right thing, directed by Spike Lee, has been embraced as a classic film with the theme of love, hatred, racism, and violence. Participants in our discussion all agreed this movie is thought-provoking, painful,l but very educational. In the discussion, we tried to seek the ultimate answer for what is “the right thing”. Did Mookie do the right thing? Did Sal do the right thing? Can we justify the actions of the police? We also analyzed characters’ motivation, their engagement in the story and their shared responsibility toward the final tragedy. Across the Fall 2020 term, the CLE Movie Club watched and discussed seven films in four languages, including a collaboration with the Chinese Movie Club and SUSTech students currently abroad. CLE movie club is looking forward to your participation in the upcoming Spring semester. If you are also a movie lover, please come and join us.  

SUSTech Students Succeed in FLTRP Cup Provincial Semi-Finals

The Provincial-Level Semifinals of 2020 National “FLTRP · ETIC Cup” English Writing, Reading, and Public Speaking Contests were held on November 7th, 2020 in Xinhua College of Sun Yat-Sen University in Dongguan, Guangdong. A total of ten SUSTech students represented SUSTech participated in the provincial-level semifinals and six of them won third-prizes in the writing and reading contests. Four SUSTech undergraduates took part in the writing contests. They composed one expository essay and one argumentative essay within two hours. Luo Yunhao, Jiang Xinyu and Xia Zihan finally won third prizes. To prepare participant students for such writing contest, the Center for Language Education (CLE) provided a series of writing workshops targeting specific writing skills in the contest.   The reading contest attracted more than 200 students over 65 universities in Guangdong province. Of the four SUSTech contestants, Jia Shiyin, Xu Ruoyu and Yang Yi won third prizes in the FLTRP reading contest at the provincial level.   For the speaking contest, Cui Junhao and Xia Yiting participated in the speaking semifinal. Though they did not win prizes, they appreciated the great learning journey. After watching the final contest, Junhao and Yiting expressed that they had learned much from those outstanding contestants and would like to share their experience and observation with future speaking contestants from SUSTech.   Since July 2020, the CLE has organized the “10th Anniversary Celebration of SUSTech” English Contests & 2020 “FLTRP · ETIC Cup” English Preliminary Contests on campus and offered our students full support. Thirteen CLE instructors formed three contest preparation teams to organize three contests respectively and coach the contestants for the provincial-level semifinals. It’s the first time SUSTech students have signed up for all the three contests organized by FLTRP, and their trip to Dongguan proved to be a success. The CLE is proud of all the contestants’ hard work and performance and encourages more students to embrace such a wonderful learning opportunity in the future.


CLE Movie Club and CLE Chinese Movie Club Team Up Online

Two CLE clubs teamed up on Saturday, November 14th for a language and culture exchange online. The CLE Chinese Movie Club, led by Dr. Zhu Wenhui, seeks to introduce Chinese culture and provide language practice to the international students. Especially valuable during the pandemic, this valuable activity serves our SUSTech students who are outside of China. Meanwhile, the CLE Movie Club is primarily an opportunity for participants to practice their English. The two clubs met online last Saturday for a discussion of the Chinese language film, “Eat Drink Man Woman” by the famous director Ang Li. CLE Movie Club co-founder Dr. Rongrong Dong authored the thought-provoking discussion questions in English for both clubs, and Dr. Wenhui added in additional notes for the language development and expression of the international students.       To manage the event online, the clubs used online video conference software. Sharing mostly audio interaction and some video participants as well. Most of the discussion was in English, and there was also a portion dedicated to Chinese language practice for the international students. Even Movie Club co-leader AL Evans joined in the Chinese language practice.   Through collaborations like these, the CLE hopes to serve both our students on campus and our students abroad. Sharing our common love for movies, exploring and sharing Chinese culture, and practicing our languages, we congratulate the two clubs for their accomplishment. It is a lovely way to spend an hour on a Saturday afternoon.

Choice of Words in Translation: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

  Our final Workplace English Development presentation was hosted by Dr. Lingli Xie, covering the topic of "Choice of Words in Translation: A Cross Cultural Perspective". Using examples from SUSTech's own email listserv, Lingli showed the confusion which arises when cultural context is not incorporated into word meaning. Lingli also highlighted the double edged sword of using a Thesaurus, and how words that have the same meaning oftentimes don't fit into the same context, using an example from the sitcom, "Friends". While we want variety in our language usage, we must be careful to consider our choice of words when avoiding repeition.     Workshop-12 Nov(1) (PowerPoint)


Decoding Latin Terms in Research Writing

The first of two CLE Writing Workshops featured Beatrice Clegg presenting on "Decoding Latin Terms in Research Writing". Throughout her workshop, she not only provided examples, but more importantly, the meaning, history and proper usage of Latin as it applies to research writing. The history of Latin within the English language is complex, and even in modern writing, it can be argued that nearly 50% of our vernacular comes from Latin. Underscoring this importance, Beatrice showcased Latin terms in common usage and how to properly use them, including italics, placement of periods, and the difference between one (i.e.) or the other (e.g.). The Writing Center helps both students and staff across the SUSTech campus with assistance, and will continue with another Workshop next week on "Practical Email Writing".   Latin (PowerPoint)

Decoding Latin Terms in Research Writing

This week, the CLE Writing Center will begin a pair of two workshops focusing on different aspects as they pertain to specific purposes. First will be Beatrice Clegg presenting on "Decoding Latin Terms in Research Writing", taking into account commonly used examples and how to correctly use them in your writing. English writers actually use Latin terms more than they might realize, and through this workshop, you will get insight into how to use them as a strength, not a liability, in your research writing. All SUSTech staff and students are encouraged to attend, and we look forward to seeing you there!


Choice of Words in Translation: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

  The Center for Language Education continues its Workplace English Development Series with this week's topic, "Choice of Words in Translation: A Cross-Cultural Perspective", hosted by Dr. Lingli Xie. Continuing off of last week's theme of "Translation", Dr. Xie will address cross-cultural perspectives, and how that affects words choice, sentence structure and ultimately, meaning of the overall translation. SUSTech staff are highly encouraged to attend, as this presentation is applicable to the daily translations done across campus, and part of the internationalization of the university.

Translations Strategies: From the Perspective of Hypotaxis and Parataxis

  Our Workplace English Development Series continued with Chu Yu presenting on "Translation Strategies: From the Perspective of Hypotaxis and Parataxis". Taking an introspective look at the challenges facing translation to/from Chinese/English, various examples were shared, highlighting the inaccuracies which can oftentimes affect word meaning and context.     Chu Yu did an excellent job of eliciting audience feedback and examples, showcasing the shortcomings of tools like Google Translate, and how they miss the meaning of translation, focusing only on the literal words. Similarly, the importance of connecting words, and how they give added meaning to translations was also shown, again, with excellent examples. Translation (PowerPoint)


EAP Writing Workshop: Using Punctuation Marks in Academic Writing

Our EAP Writing Workshops continued, with Dr. Ma Ji presenting on "Using Punctuation Marks in Academic Writing", focusing on the details associated with correct usage of these critical symbols, and their importance in English writing. From commas to colons, and from questions to exclamations, the argument was made that punctuation marks are equally as important as words in academic writing.Using examples from students as well as published works, Ma Ji highlighted different usage techniques, including when, how, where and why to use (or not use) certain punctuation marks. Sentences can be like formulas, where structure matters, not just applying to words, but to correct punctuation, too.Over the course of the semester, the Center for Language Education offers numerous workshops on writing, focusing on different aspects each week. If you are interested in finding out more information, or if you have specific questions about your writing, feel free to reach out and contact us, and we can help point you in the right direction.  

EAP Writing Workshop: Using Punctuation Marks in Academic Writing

Our EAP Writing Workshops continued, with Dr. Ma Ji presenting on "Using Punctuation Marks in Academic Writing", focusing on the details associated with correct usage of these critical symbols, and their importance in English writing. From commas to colons, and from questions to exclamations, the argument was made that punctuation marks are equally as important as words in academic writing.Using examples from students as well as published works, Ma Ji highlighted different usage techniques, including when, how, where and why to use (or not use) certain punctuation marks. Sentences can be like formulas, where structure matters, not just applying to words, but to correct punctuation, too.Over the course of the semester, the Center for Language Education offers numerous workshops on writing, focusing on different aspects each week. If you are interested in finding out more information, or if you have specific questions about your writing, feel free to reach out and contact us, and we can help point you in the right direction.  


TA Teaching Development Program

The TA Teaching Development Program has begun it's second term, with 43 different Teaching Assistants from 13 different departments, schools, and centers from across the SUSTech campus learning together to enhance their English-language teaching skills. The program is conducted over eight weeks, with an emphasis placed on using English as the Medium of Instruction in all respective disciplines. Weekly topics range from "Syllabus Design" to "Curriculum Development" and from "Classroom Management" to "Reflective Teaching" all providing the TAs with relevant examples to apply in their class, broadening their role and responsibilities as teachers. Upon completion of the term, the Teaching Assistants will deliver a Teaching Demonstration, highlighting the methods learned and applying them to their own class, showcasing their understanding and implementation of the topics discussed throughout the program. The Center for Language Education continues to foster the cross-collaboration of different departments across the teaching and learning landscape at SUSTech, and is excited about programs such as this. Learning is lifelong, and as teachers, we should never stop learning.

Study Abroad Language Development Workshop Series Finishes a Second Successful Run

The Study Abroad Language Development series concluded last Thursday, October 29th with its final session. Across 6 weeks, the participants learned a variety of different language and cultural issues intended to facilitate success in study abroad. This was the second successful run of the series. The first set of lectures and activities occurred online during the summer, and the fall workshop series marked the second iteration. Strong participation in both series has led to plans for more workshops in future semesters, and further expansion. A signature feature of the workshops was a high degree of interaction. This popular element of the design was one of the most well-received characteristics. Students interacted with each other and the instructor was regularly seen to leave the podium and enter the audience among the theater seating. Comments and suggestions from students have provided also valuable ideas for future improvements, including guest speakers, and the potential addition of assignments and preview videos to create more room for the greatly valued interaction. The successful project was initiated by SUSTech Global in collaboration with the Center for Language education. We celebrate the teamwork that created this sustainable program, especially the work of Zou Yuyang from SUSTech Global, and Albert Evans from the Center for Language Education.


Using Punctuation Marks in Academic Writing

The CLE Writing Workshop Series continues this week, with EAP teacher, Dr. Ma Ji, presenting on "Using Punctuation Marks in Academic Writing." Punctuation, from full stop "periods" to pauses with "commas" add meaning and structure to any academic writing, and in fact, are an important aspect of good writing skills. During this session, explanations will be given for how, when, where and why to use correct punctuation in English writing, and all SUSTech students and staff are encouraged to attend.

Medical School Faculty Development Program Ceremony

The Center for Language Education, in partnership with the SUSTech School of Medicine, recently held a ceremony for the Medical School Faculty Development Program. Doctors from the First Affiliated Hospital of SUSTech, the Second Affiliated Hospital of SUSTech as well as SUSTech Hospital attended, with both hospital leadership as well as doctors giving speeches about their teaching and learning experiences and how they grew from the program. In addition, the Dean of the School of Medicine, Dr. Xing Mingzhao, as well as the Director of the CLE, Dr. Li Yuan, also spoke to the importance of using English in medical education, and how it benefits not only the university, but the larger city of Shenzhen as well. On behalf of the university, Vice-Chairperson Li Fengliang and Vice President Lu Chun spoke about the role programs like this play within the university and how it highlights the positive direction SUSTech is heading, not only with our Medical School, but in English-language instruction across different disciplines.   This is the second year the Medical School Faculty Development Program has taken place, and in both sessions, observable and measurable development can be seen on behalf of the doctors, utilizing creative and sustainable pedagogical approaches to teaching which benefits their classrooms. It is our hope that this program continues to grow and that the cooperation of SUSTech's affiliated hospitals remains a model of educational parternship.


Staff Development Series: Translation Strategies

The CLE's Workplace English Development Series continues this week, with Chu Yu presenting on the topic of, "Translation Strategies: From the Perspective of Hypotaxis and Parataxis". Ms. Yu hold a Master's Degree in Scientific, Technical and Medical Translation and will offer insight into this skill, and how it can be effectively transferred into the workplace.  All SUSTech Faculty and Staff are encouraged to attend as it is relevant to different departments across campus.

CLE Movie Club: The Nightmare Before Christmas

“The Nightmare Before Christmas” (1993) is the 15th film CLE movie club watched and discussed this Tuesday, Oct 27th. We selected this film as a way to celebrate the coming Halloween. Even though this film is Halloween related, it contains broader themes and presents cross-cultural perspectives to the audiences. Amazed by the happiness and warmth of Christmas, Jack, the Pumpkin King, decided to kidnap Santa and deliver his version of Christmas to the kids in Christmas town. Under this cross-cultural theme, we shared our own experiences and stories on new culture encountering. Club leaders also recommended some horror films by the end of the discussion. Our next meeting is on Nov.10th, you are welcomed to scan our QQ group QR code and find more about our club.


Speak Up: Being Presentable University Administrators

The CLE Workplace English Development Series continues, with Dr. Li Zhuo giving a workshop, titled, "Speak Up: Being Presentable University Administrators".  A comprehensive approach to speaking in English both inside and outside the office, this workshop will provide you with not only the tools, but perhaps more importantly, the confidence to find success in working in an English-speaking environment. We encourage all SUSTech faculty and staff to attend; growing in comfort with using English in the workplace.

Medical School Faculty Development Program Ceremony

Date: Wednesday, October 28th The Center for Language Education, in partnership with the SUSTech School of Medicine, will host a ceremony this Wednesday, October 28th, at 7pm at 学生宿舍14栋105活动室 Doctors from the SUSTech School of Medicine, the 1st Affiliated Hospital of SUSTech, the 2nd Affiliated Hospital of SUSTech, and SUTech Hospital will be celebrating the successful completion of the Medical School Faculty Development Program, and over the course of the evening, will share their experiences learning and implementing innovative teaching techniques into their classrooms.


EAP Workshop: Planning Your Academic Argument

    Our EAP Workshop Series continued in it's second week, with Chu Yu presenting on the topic of "Planning Your Academic Argument" as it applies to not only research writing, but generally, to any variety of issues pertaining to writing skills. Students from across different levels attended the interactive workshop, providing examples of their own as they applied to when they utilize the skill of planning in their writing, learning how to transfer an initial layout into a finalized written work. The EAP team will continue offering Writing Workshops over the next few weeks, and of course, encourage everyone to attend to help develop this important communication tool. Planning Your Academic Argument (PowerPoint)

EAP Workshop: Planning Your Academic Argument

   Our EAP Workshop Series continued in it's second week, with Chu Yu presenting on the topic of "Planning Your Academic Argument" as it applies to not only research writing, but generally, to any variety of issues pertaining to writing skills.Students from across different levels attended the interactive workshop, providing examples of their own as they applied to when they utilize the skill of planning in their writing, learning how to transfer an initial layout into a finalized written work.The EAP team will continue offering Writing Workshops over the next few weeks, and of course, encourage everyone to attend to help develop this important communication tool.Planning Your Academic Argument (PowerPoint)


Office English: Language in the Workplace

  The Workplace English Development Series, hosted by the CLE, began this week, with Matthew Jellick leading the first workshop on the topic of "Office English: Language in the Workplace." SUSTech staff from different departments were in attendance, where, to begin, they worked in small groups, discussing the topic of Why and then sharing their ideas with the larger class. These Workshops will continue throughout the semester, touching on different aspects of English Development, and we look forward to continuing to work in partnership as we grow together for stronger English competency across campus.     Office English (PowerPoint)

EAP Writing Workshop: Planning Your Academic Argument

  The second EAP Writing Workshop will take place this Thursday, October 22nd, with Chu Yu presenting on the topic of "Planning Your Academic Argument". When developing both oral and written arguments, it is critical to have a good plan before you speak or write, and through this interactive workshop, students will learn some of the tools necessary, from their opening thesis to their concluding argument. All students from all different levels are encouraged to attend, as the ideas shared and discussed can be applied to all disciplines across campus.


TA Teaching Development Program Ceremony

Please join us as we celebrate the completion of a successful TA Teaching Development Program from last semester, and embark upon another semester of teaching and learning opportunities. Certificates will be awarded to those Teaching Assistants who successfully completed the program last semester, and in turn we will launch the start of our new program for this semester. Discussions on creative and innovative approaches to to education will be shared, and we look forward to continued cross-departmental collaboration we strive on our path towards excellence!

Study Abroad Language Development Workshop Series #4

The 4th in the series of the Study Abroad Language Development Workshops was completed on Thursday, October 15th. In this meeting, the participants examined two main topics: application essays, and “Breaking the Ice.” The first hour delivered an overview of two essential components of the application for graduate school. These are the personal statement and the statement of purpose. The presenter, Al Evans from the Center for Language Education, pointed out the differences between the two and guided the participants in understanding strategies for each. A workshop is not complete without some practice, and the participants wrote sample paragraphs for each of the two essays. The second hour continued the long-term theme of cross cultural communication to enhance the study abroad experience. During the session entitled “Breaking the Ice,” the students learned a variety of potential strategies for starting conversations with complete strangers during study abroad. These were immediately put to use in practice exercises. Students were required to meet unknown classmates in the workshop, and start conversations. Intensifying the challenge, students were then asked to approach a group of students and initiate conversation. By the end of the 2nd hour, participants had gained basic facility in these arduous challenges. The workshops, created in collaboration between SUSTech Global and the Center for Language Education, will continue developing study abroad skills for 2 more weeks. Our next workshop will be held on Thursday, October 22nd.


“Still Walking” with the CLE Movie Club

The CLE Movie Club met on Tuesday, October 13th to discuss the 2008 film, “Still Walking” by famed writer/director Hirokazu Koreeda. Focusing on the tension in the Yokoyama family, the club discussed the family themes and how families deal with tragedies, or avoid them. Films are always watched prior to the meetings, reserving meeting time exclusively for discussion, which often spills over into the QQ group. “Still Walking” completes the movie club’s 14th film, and its 3rd movie for the semester. Diversity in film source and content are important for club creators and co-founders Rongrong Dong and Al Evans, and this film by a Japanese director is a good example. The leaders compose a list of film notes to guide the discussion and help participants to prepare in advance. This week’s film notes also examined the distinguished and award-winning career of the director. The next meeting is on October 27th, when we will discuss a Halloween -themed film, “The Nightmare Before Christmas” (1993). See you there!

Workplace English Development Series: "Office English: Language in the Workplace"

  In an effort to promote English development in the workplace, the Center for Language Education (CLE) will host a series of five English Workshops aimed at helping SUSTech Staff increase their potential for oral communication at work. The first one will take place this week, with Matthew Jellick presenting on the topic of "Office English: Language in the Workplace", focusing on language competency in a professional international setting. All SUSTech staff from all departments are encouraged to attend, and we look forward to seeing you there!


EAP Workshop: The Pitfalls of Plagiarism

The Center for Language Education (CLE) will host a series of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Writing Workshops! Beginning tomorrow, and held every Thursday at lunch (12:30pm - 1:30pm), these Writing Workshops are open to the entire SUSTech Community of Learners who want to learn specialized tools and tips as they apply to Academic Writing. These workshops will help students develop strong writing skills which they can use for classroom assignments, published research, or continued growth as writers. This week, EAP Course Coordinator, Matthew Jellick will present on "The Pitfalls of Plagiarism", offering both advice and suggestions for avoidance, and instead, make your paper a well-cited and referenced work of academic writing. The CLE EAP team remains dedicated to offering continued opportunities for academic growth outside of class, and we hope to see you at one of our Writing Workshops.

EAP Workshop: The Pitfalls of Plagiarism

The Center for Language Education (CLE) will host a series of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Writing Workshops! Beginning tomorrow, and held every Thursday at lunch (12:30pm - 1:30pm), these Writing Workshops are open to the entire SUSTech Community of Learners who want to learn specialized tools and tips as they apply to Academic Writing. These workshops will help students develop strong writing skills which they can use for classroom assignments, published research, or continued growth as writers. This week, EAP Course Coordinator, Matthew Jellick will present on "The Pitfalls of Plagiarism", offering both advice and suggestions for avoidance, and instead, make your paper a well-cited and referenced work of academic writing. The CLE EAP team remains dedicated to offering continued opportunities for academic growth outside of class, and we hope to see you at one of our Writing Workshops.


CLE Movie Club discusses its 2nd film of Autumn

The CLE Movie Club held its 2nd meeting of the Fall term on 29 September. The film selected for this time was the first Stephen Spielberg and Tom Cruise collaboration, “Minority Report.” Our movie Club participants discussed a number of themes in the film, including the main topic of free will versus determinism. Among the more interesting discussions were a black hole theory explanation of determinism, and the film’s prediction of invasive personalized advertising.     Movie Club activities, besides being a fun and exciting way to break through the traditional language learning, offer a variety of pluses that directly contribute to the student’s language learning experience. This film was the lucky 13th film viewed and discussed by the CLE Movie Club. Conversations continue to overflow from the regular meeting to our lively QQ group, along with chats about the film industry and other movie news.     Our next meeting will be after the holidays, on October 13th. We will discuss the Japanese film “Aruite Mo Aruite Mo (Still Walking)” from the famous and award-winning director Hirokazu Koreeda. Join us!   Scan here to join our CLE Movie Club group on QQ

Study Abroad Language Development Workshop Series #2/6: Admission, Language & Culture

The 2nd of our 6 workshops in the  Study Abroad Language Development Workshop Series was held successfully on Thursday , September 24th. The enthusiastic participants covered 2 main topics.In the first hour, the workshop addressed admissions interviews, and examined the background, expectations, common problems, and recommended solutions. For a workshop, it is important to include practical activities, and the first hour concluded with a lively series of practice interviews.Our second hour delivered the 2nd in a series of media issues for study abroad. This time, the topic was music and how study abroad students can explore music for a variety of language and cultural development. Ranging from background music and setting targeted phrases to music, to cultural integration through singing with others, this hour surprised more than one student with its diverse and thought-provoking content. Many of the songs used in the hour were chosen for their simplicity and accessibility, and students were seen adding them to their own playlists throughout the second hour.The series, created by SUSTech Global and the CLE’s Al Evans, takes a break for the national holiday, and will resume with part 3 immediately after the holiday concludes.


International EAP Class

In an effort to provide an authentic-as-possible learning experience to international students who could not come back to campus this semester due to COVID-19, English for Academic Purposes Course Coordinator, Matthew Jellick, has created a specialized class for the five international students enrolled in the EAP program.  Meeting every Monday evening online at 7pm China time, Matthew hosts a separate class, live on Zoom, with international students from Cambodia and Kazakhstan joining for an engaging, interactive and rather demanding course. Aiming to replicate the in-class experience as closely as possible, the international students participate in discussion, as well as get a personalized lesson, including slides, examples and content sharing in a seminar-like setting.  While the current set of global circumstances are constantly fluctuating, this approach of getting all the international EAP students into one class seems to benefit everyone involved, providing discourse which may be overlooked through video sharing alone. Internationalization can act as a catalyst for expanded worldviews, which in turn create opportunities for idea sharing, and through this specialized class, we aim to do just that, trying to make the most out of a complicated situation.

Developing Driveshafts:the Storyline's Engine

  The third writing workshop took place last evening at SUSTech. In the first session, three weeks ago, the writers shared why they wanted to write, and thought about what they may actually write. Ideas were bounced off one another and further developed.   The second workshop then developed from the first, and inspiration and story development were the themes of the evening. A segment of Masterclass by award winning screenplay writer, Aaron Sorkin was shown to help stimulate story development. The concepts of a) intention, and b) obstacle were the main discussions to help extend inspiration that is entangled with interesting and engaging plots that considered the turmoil that obstacles create, preventing intention from happening.   Last night, was a more advanced development of story throughlines. Participants physically constructed a timeline of the story, adding: characters, a main driveshaft (what is the overarching goal), and a set of intentions and obstacles.   Participant Zangi created story throughlines, quite literally, and shared his ideas with others to help him express his literary intentions, as well as get very helpful feedback from peers.     Here, writer Ting expresses her story throughline.   In this series of workshops, English Language Development is the vehicle used to gain other equally or more important skillsets such as, creative and critical thinking, giving and receiving critical feedback, and project management. All participants now have stories in progress.    


“Study Abroad Language Development Workshop Series” now underway in Fall 2020

After a successful introduction in the summer, the Study Abroad Language Development Workshop Series kicked off its fall semester on Thursday, September 17th. This program is a collaboration between SUSTech Global and the Center for Language Education. The workshop series aims to meet the needs of future study abroad students through language and cultural development. Each workshop addresses a language topic and a cultural development topic over the course of 2 hours. Cultural development is a new aspect for the workshop series. The first workshop introduced the value of media to learning language and cultural discovery. In addition, students were shown how to effectively use a television series to enhance conversation and develop friendships in the study abroad environment. Future workshops will explore other media, including news, movies, and other sources. The six-part series continues every Thursday for the next 5 weeks. Workshops are led by Al Evans of the Center for Language Education, with support from Robert Chow and others at SUSTech Global. Working together, the team hopes to provide students with a valuable experience in preparation for their future studies in other countries.  

SUSTech Writing Group: Developing the Elements of Intentions and Obstacles

By Stephen Pellerine The Center for Language Education opens its first SUSTech Writing Group: The Author in You this semester. It is 12-series workshop aiming to promote authorship to the SUSTech community, whom enjoy writing. Tuesday September 14, 2020 was the second SUSTech Writing Club meeting. In this second session participants started by sharing literary developments, developed from the previous session. Students stepped up to the podium and shared very engaging and touching stories, while others provided critical, yet supportive feedback. The session tonight focused on developing the elements of intentions and obstacles. Following discussions based on segments from Masterclass with Aaron Sorkin, addressing theses elements, students wrote a mini sample relevant to their specific fictional interests. It is once again so nice to see such a cross-section from SUSTech, from students to faculty, and from Research Assistants to Researchers all sharing interests in writing and developing critical and creative thinking in the process. Sample stories evolving are a narrative through photography, a sci-fi, the rebel boy, and the life through the perspective of a cat: a philosophy for life. Next week, session three, will move on to look at developing a comprehensive drivetrain that is the main story throughline, a throughline that is decorated with intentions and obstacles. It will be interesting to see where the stories take us.     Photos by Stephen Pellerine


Continued Language Support: CLE Language Help Service (LHS) 2020 Fall from September 14th

The Language Help Service, a language support program offered by the CLE, continues its service to the entire SUSTech community – students, faculty, and staff from September 14th. 2020. All sessions of the first few days were fully booked immediately after its opening. The CLE Language Help Service is a one-on-one foreign language development service, with a commitment to provide ongoing language support to the SUSTech community. The service includes English writing support, speaking practice and English learning consultation for all, as well as Chinese language tutoring for international students and staff.   SUSTech members are welcome to reserve a 25-minute face-to-face session with a CLE faculty member. This semester, the CLE faculty will continue to offer more than 60 sessions per week to meet the demand of foreign language development at SUSTech. The CLE Language Help Service was launched in 2018, and has provided language help to a wide range of SUSTech members for more than two years. All CLE faculty endeavor to make this program an accessible pathway for the SUSTech members to achieve and extend their English language competitiveness and excellence! It also serves as a language hub for international faculty and students to adapt themselves to the work and life at SUSTech.

IELTS & TOEFL Weekly: Special Language Help Service Session

In 2020 Fall semester, CLE launched the new IELTS & TOEFL Weekly program to help students who are in need of IELTS of TOEFL practice. The first session of the “IELTS & TOEFL Weekly” was held on September 14th. Around 26 students participated and gave positive feedback. As part of the Language Help Service (LHS), the CLE is providing students with more than 20 hours of free tutorials of IELTS and TOEFL practices. This new program was designed and hosted by Stephen Pellerine, an experienced faculty in testing and assessment at CLE, with an aim to provide systematic and practical IELTS and TOEFL test preparation guidance to more SUSTech students.   Different from regular Language Help Service sessions, students can feel free to drop in every Monday from 10:30 to 12:00 (TB1 409) for information, tips, practice, and mock tests. There is no need to reserve a time slot, but sessions will start at 10:30 then progress until 12:00. Throughout the whole semester, specific topics such as general tips, building vocabulary, writing skills, secrets for high scores and mock tests in listening, reading, writing, and speaking will be addressed each week. Students can drop in for one of these sessions according to their needs, or attend all of them. The delivery of each session may be influenced by student numbers, but efforts will be made when possible to help students with specific needs and challenges. With the efforts and creativity of all CLE members, Language Help Service will continue to provide effective and individualized language support to the whole SUSTech community.


CLE Teacher Wins "Administrative Service Award"

  Every year SUSTech hosts this annual awards ceremony recognizing outstanding teachers, researchers and administrators, all of whom have helped to pave the path forward for the university. At this year’s annual “Teachers’ Day Award Ceremony”, Center for Language Education Teacher, Matthew Jellick, won the “Administrative Service Award” of the year, recognized for his efforts in expanding English learning opportunities outside the classroom and extending it to the whole SUSTech community. Representing the CLE, Matthew was honored to highlight not only his personal commitment, but that as a reflection of the entire center. In his speech, he states, “the Center for Language Education aims to provide genuine opportunities for linguistic and cultural sharing, whereby people get to know each other through interactive shared experiences.”  

Staff English Movie Day

Staff English Teacher, Matthew Jellick, wrote his second Film Review, this time analyzing the recent movie "Tenet" which he took the Staff English Movie Club to go see last weekend. The movie, which showcases future dilemmas which go to preserve present status quo, is complex in nature, yet upon insightful review, mimics our own current set of circumstances as we try to navigate through these trying times. In 2018, the Staff English Movie Club went to see "Isle of Dogs" which was also reviewed for it's content and insightful views into current social climates. This is the fourth movie the Staff English Movie Club has attended, with others planned for the future.   http://www.szdaily.com/content/2020-09/11/content_23545164.htm


SUSTech Writing Group: The Author in You

By Stephen Pellerine One of the CLE’s vision is to expand the use of English beyond typical and traditional classroom activities. This vision includes extracurricular activities open to all SUSTech members that bring diversity from the college together, in mentally stimulating scenarios, even going beyond English and language into realms of critical and creative thinking. The newly inaugurated Writing Group is one such trial. The CLE has opened the first 12-series workshop aiming to promote authorship to the SUSTech community, whom enjoy writing.   The initiative of authoring a book was introduced to the 16 attendees who brought mountains of motivation and endless energy that made the first meeting quite spectacular. It was a small group, somewhat intentionally, to allow for the development of meaningful relationships that inspire. The writing task, of creating a work of fiction, is at the core, to promote exploratory writing. Attendees, on the first night had shared why they came and what they are looking for. Predictably, there was a wide range of responses from participants. Many will develop fictional work, and some will integrate art work or merge personal narratives. All genres and all literary desires were respected and supported. The larger goal is just this: being able to communicate such individualized personal intentions, and being appreciated for these differences, in the absence of judgement.   You do not need to be Steve McCurry to take a photo worthy of hanging. Nor do you need to be Shakespeare to have a book in print for years to come. If we have the desire and the motivation – all of us can write a book. If a ‘novel’ is too much of an undertaking, short stories were recommended as a path forward for attendees. Other options discussed in the first session were books containing poetry, photography, sketching, and even composing meaningful children’s stories. Everyone should be able to succeed if a manageable project is carefully planned and followed. A goal that extends beyond the goal of simply having workshop attendees produce a book, is to provide pathways for current and future students whom have a writer within, to come out. The goal is to motivate creative writing. Join us or follow our progress!  

Staff English Movie Day

  Staff English Teacher, Matthew Jellick, hosted his fourth annual Staff English Movie Day, taking SUSTech Staff Students to see the new American film, "Tenet".  In a continuing tradition, each year staff students enjoy an English film followed by lunch where the movie's underlying themes are discussed, touching upon cultural, societal and of course linguistic issues.  Past Staff English Movie Days include "La La Land", "Isle of Dogs" and "Crazy Rich Asians", all of which lent themselves to deep analysis while at the same time, an overall great experience.  "Tenet" was no exception, and a great time was had by all!


Staff English Movie Day

      CLE Staff English Teacher, Matthew Jellick, will host the fourth annual Staff English Movie Day, joining SUSTech Staff Students to watch the new American film, "Tenet". Each year, Matthew takes staff students to see an American film, then discusses the topics and cultural relevance over lunch. An opportunity for extended learning outside the classroom, past Staff English films have included "La La Land" and "Isle of Dogs" and "Crazy Rich Asians" each layered with deep meaning, exposing the power of film, with rich discussion shared among the staff. An excellent opportunity for both cultural and linguistic growth, this annual tradition is always something to look forward to!

The Center for Language Education launches its pre-sessional program for the new students 

On August 31st, one week before the 2020 new students formally start their university study, the Center for Language Education launches its pre-sessional program for the new students. The week-long intensive pre-sessional program aims to facilitate students with the key learning skills that will help new college students adjust to academic life and culture at an international university where English is one of the key languages for instruction and learning. The pre-sessional program will last five days and help the freshmen build up the study skills that they need to succeed at the university level. The training starts with  English Speaking Activities that serve as the warm-up session and the speaking proficiency test, conducted in a natural learning environment. The Language in Academic Setting with a focus on academic English, academic vocabulary, and academic tasks on the second day will familiarize students with the English language that they will use throughout their study life at SUSTech. On the third day, students will be given the opportunity to analyze their own English proficiency and identify the key skills to develop and strategies to do it. Converting the knowledge acquired in secondary school to the practical and productive language skills at SUSTech is the content of the fourth day when seminar skills, presentation skills and email etiquette will be introduced to new students. The week-long program will be wrapped up with student’s self-management skills, including the management of time, study space, workload, and motivation. The highly interactive skill-building classes with English as the medium of instruction link student’s English language development with the building of their learning skills. It will set up a good foundation for their academic success and beyond, ensuring a good start to a sustained future here at SUSTech.  


Study Abroad Seminar Series Beats the Summer Heat

SUSTech Global and the Center for Language Education (CLE) collaborated over summer 2020 to produce the Study Abroad Seminar Series. The weekly program featured a series of 4 seminars aimed at improving skills needed by students for future study abroad. To manage the series during COVID-19, the seminars were delivered online using video conferencing technology and the Blackboard learning management system familiar to all SUSTech students. Topics included admission interviews, emails, application essays, office visits, and more. Much of the focus was on the cross-cultural aspects of communication in these situations, with a goal of raising awareness of problems and providing practical solutions or strategies. The series was taught by the CLE’s Al Evans, with the assistance of SUSTech Global’s Yumo Peng and Dan Yang. Yuyang Zou of SUSTech Global managed communications and recruitment. Students were pleased with the program, saying in a survey that they particularly liked the interview and application sections. The interactive style of the seminars was a popular feature.

Staff English Book Club: "Still Life with Woodpecker" By: Tom Robbins

The Staff English Book Club, hosted by Matthew Jellick, will enter it's seventh(!) semester this Fall, reading Still Life with Woodpecker by Tom Robbins. Described as a post-modern fairy tale, major themes include "metaphysical outlawism", with the Moon playing a central role, as it is apt to do. The novel continuously addresses the question of "how to make love stay" and throughout our reading in the Staff English Book Club, we can't wait to find out!


Monthly English Corners

  Monthly opportunities for continued English communication are offered through the CLE English Corners. Hosted for both faculty and staff, these hour-long get-together's provide an authentic platform for English speaking and listening, meeting people from across campus in an effort to facilitate cross-departmental collaboration. The CLE will provide light snacks and drinks, aiming to create an authentic arena for English communication, fostering linguistic growth through a low-intensity environment.

Writing Center Workshops: Fall 2020

Writing is an important tool of communication, whether for research or personal purposes. In an effort to provide insight into writing tips not commonly addressed, but on topics which we often use, the CLE Writing Center will host two workshops this semester. Please join us as we explore Latin terms used in research writing (i.e., e.g., etc.) as well as the tools necessary to write a good email, mixing professionalism with personality.


English Mock Interview Practice

  In an effort to continue to offer sustainable, practical and authentic English-language tools which are applicable to real life situations, CLE teacher Matthew Jellick will be hosting "English Mock Interview Practice" this upcoming Fall semester. Appointments are on an as-need basis, and are conducted, in person, through a one-on-one practice scenario. Feel free to inquire or register by emailing: matthewj@sustech.edu.cn  

CLE YouTube Channel

In an effort to expand our "digital" reach, the CLE is developing our YouTube Channel, highlighting both teacher and student examples from both inside as well as outside the classroom. We invite you to take a look and find out more information about us through this digital platform, and reach out to us if you would like to contribute, too. CLE YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCab4jbixTxJf2pOcbTj4RPg?view_as=subscriber


EAP Workshop Series

  In an effort for extended learning opportunities outside the classroom, the CLE English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Team will be hosting a series of four Workshops during the Fall Semester.  These Workshops are open to all SUSTech Students and Staff, with the aim to help improve your Academic Writing, regardless of your major, interest or career.    Take responsibility for the words you write, and please attend one or all of our upcoming Workshops!

EAP Workshop Series

 In an effort for extended learning opportunities outside the classroom, the CLE English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Team will be hosting a series of four Workshops during the Fall Semester.  These Workshops are open to all SUSTech Students and Staff, with the aim to help improve your Academic Writing, regardless of your major, interest or career.  Take responsibility for the words you write, and please attend one or all of our upcoming Workshops!


CLE Hosts a Successful FLTRP Speaking Contest

2020 FLTRP@SUSTech Speaking Contest The Center for Language Education (CLE) hosted a Speaking Contest this past Saturday, with 26 SUSTech students participating before a panel of five CLE judges. The contest was run in partnership with the Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press (FLTRP), where top-level speaking candidates will participate in provincial and national level competitions. The brave and well-spoken SUSTech students came from all undergraduate grade levels and presented personalized 3-minute videos pertaining to the topic of “Advancement and Challenges” providing in-depth analysis through refined presentation skills. Each of the participants answered two questions from the judges, giving detailed insight which clarified their positions on their topics, presenting through high-level speaking skills. The FLTRP Speaking Competition is the first of three, with a Reading Contest and Writing Contest scheduled for next semester. Through these challenging platforms, SUSTech students are able to showcase their vast knowledge and experience through their English language skill sets, showcasing the broad depth of linguistic and cultural understanding. Over the course of the Speaking Competition, each of the five the judges came away impressed by the student’s ability to articulate complex thoughts through both a prepared speech and real-time questions. This contest is an example of the high level of English ability among SUSTech students, and we look forward to continued displays of these skills in the upcoming Reading and Writing Competitions as well. List of Winners: Grand Prize: Cui Junhao 1st Prizes: Xia Yiting and Zheng Fujia 2nd Prizes: Shu Huazhang, Xia Zihan and Zhou Xinyi 3rd Prizes: Xu Gelei, Liang Jiayuan, Sun Hanxi and Zhang Yan    

EAP Team Wins the Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press Award

The English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Team from the Center for Language Education (CLE) recently entered the Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press (FLTRP) contest. Highlighting a single lesson from their course, which focused on the "Peer Review" process, EAP Course Coordinator, Matthew Jellick, led a teaching demonstration, paying specific attention to the validity of the student voice in the writing-revision process, and how different perspectives oftentimes lead to valued insight. The EAP team is proud of this achievement, but much like our course itself, we understand that both teaching and learning are a continuous developmental process, so in turn, we look forward to continued growth, working with each other and our students.


Newspaper Article: SUSTech TA Development Program: Learning Through Teaching

“Education should be geared to the needs of modernization, of the world and of the future.” Since this educational principle was proposed in the 1990s by Deng Xiaoping, China’s education reform has been on the path of exploration. Using English as the medium of instruction to teach has helped promote China’s education to the world. On the one hand, it can relieve the pressure of international students’ teaching; on the other hand, it can promote the globalization of education. To further enhance the effectiveness and professionalism of Teaching Assistant classroom skills while teaching in English, this semester at Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech), the Centre for Language Education (CLE) aimed to develop the English competency of TAs through a series of eight workshops, titled “TA Teaching Development Program.” The teacher was Matthew Jellick, who calls himself a global educator. The main topics of these workshops included “Teaching Philosophy”, “Course Objectives and Student Learning Outcomes”, “Collaboration with Course Instructors”, “Classroom Language and Class Management” and “Becoming a Reflective TA”.  Through interactive lessons, Matthew showed us different teaching methods and how the teacher teaches by integrating himself into teaching as a demonstration, whether online or offline. As a PhD student, I have three years of overseas learning experience and now work as a TA at SUSTech in the Computer Science Department, understanding the importance of teaching in English. But in the practice of teaching in English, what kind of language abilities should teachers and students have? With an inquisitiveness, I joined this series of workshops. During the eight weeks, I have been thinking about it from the perspective of students, trying to learn how to solve this problem by asking what if my English is bad, what if I am shy, and what if I cannot understand the lecture.  At the end of the workshop, I had a fifteen-minute teaching demonstration to display what I had learned.  This time, I thought about it from the perspective of the teacher. How do we know, as teachers, students’ needs? For example, what if students’ English is better than ours, and should students learn subject terms in advance? Through the training, I found some answers and learned how to think about these issues. Here are some suggestions. 1) Always remember to ask volunteers first to answer questions; 2) When getting answers from students, don’t simply say right or wrong, rather, ask them how did they get it and why; 3) Remember to start with something good and say thank you, then give comments and suggestions; 4) Build a relationship with your students; 5) Get feedback from both students and colleagues for the purpose of updating and improving, because everyone is a different person tomorrow. Thinking from the perspective of teachers and students is an effective way to promote the reformation and innovation of teaching in English in China. Teaching in English opens up our global vision and inspires us to expand our thinking. And going forward, the CLE and TAs at SUSTech will keep sharing ideas beneficial to the improvement of teaching in English, benefiting both teachers and students alike.   Link: http://szdaily.sznews.com/MB/content/202007/01/content_881566.html  

CLE Chinese Courses: Bridging International Students and SUSTech

Chinese Language And Culture Teaching TeamThe Chinese Language and Culture (CLC) teaching team supports our international students with rich Chinese language and culture courses. The novel coronavirus outbreak brought  a number  of challenges to the international students: time zone differences, internet connections, technical barriers and Covid-19 threats in their own countries. Despite the challenges, SUSTech international students strengthened their connection with the university via the Chinese language and culture courses, tutorials, and culture-themed interactions. The CLC teaching team provides their effective support to the international students and builds up a bridge of learning, communication, and love.01 Shift to Online Active LearningTo address the relatively lower engagement found in online learning compared to face-to-face classes due to distance barriers and technical difficulties, the CLC program designed a great variety of activities, such as project-based learning, presentations, speech competitions, debates, role-playing, and peer-review activities to engage students and to promote their ownership of learning. Motivated by their course instructors and peers, students learned to become  active learners via their increased engagement and ownership of learning.   Student Homework Exhibition: 第22课 《母亲的心》 Student Presentation: My Favorite Chinese Cuisine 02 Flexibility Makes Inclusivity  Online teaching brings more flexibility and inclusivity. For the CLC team, integrated platforms and tools for different skills practiced are applied. Live classes are  used to present new grammar and topics, while class videos  available on Blackboard provide opportunities for students to review. These tools enable learning to becomes more accessible for the international students troubled by time zone differences. QQ and WeChat are also helpful tools for class interaction and communication outside of  class time. With them, every student has a chance to speak and write. Both teachers and students can listen to and view all the course materials in and out of class.   Student Writing Exercise     ZHU Wenhui, Course Coordinator   "The Chinese Culture course is not mere knowledge retention. Students' critical thinking, creation, and interest for China are equally valuable. Active learning motivates international students to explore Chinese culture in almost every aspect. From Chinese philosophy to great poets, featured cuisine to new science & technology, students apply digital resources in their learning naturally and surprise me with their understanding and acquisition of China and Chinese culture. By  involvement with various Chinese cultural activities (discussions, project-based essays, and individual/group presentations) and applying what they have learned to professional contexts as well as daily life situations, international students initiatively summarize their cultural experiences at  SUSTech and China, and firmly connect themselves back to our university and country. Face-to-face interactions are used as much as possible in my class. Face-to-face interactions urge students to attend the class on time, participate in class activities actively, get immediate responses from the teacher and receive enough attention since  the teacher is around. Face-to-face contact also includes teaching methods in the form of video/audio calls when using Wechat or QQ. Regular and constructive communication between students and teachers is crucial to online teaching. Assignment feedback and review, as well as discussion response in/after class improves both online teaching and learning experiences. Students’ personal opinions and difficulties out of class are also encouraged to be shared with teachers."   Huang Caiyuan, Course Instructor "For students with less than two  years Chinese studying experience, live class is my preferred  choice to give lectures of new grammar patterns and new topics, which can maximize the interactive opportunities. Students can ask questions and receive the answers instantly without waiting. Teachers can also adjust the teaching pace according to students’ responses. QQ and WeChat are used for speaking practice. After receiving the practice instructions, students just need to turn off their microphones to avoid disturbing others, record their voice while speaking and send the recordings at the required time. In addiction,these two platforms have also been used for writing practice particularly for 2-3 sentences-long text, which helps to check if students are able to use the newly learnt words and patterns  correctly. Polls  are frequently used for new word practice, like dictation, translation  and true or false exercises,  Students can type their answers with the shared website, then their answers will be displayed instantly on the same page as  mine. As the teachers, I can see their response speed. I can also decide whether or not to share the answers page."       Qi YiCourse Instructor "How to improve students’ engagement for online class and learn Chinese actively? My experiences are 1. Require students to conduct  previews for each lesson and check regularly. Students are asked to submit their reading recordings of the new words and texts before each class; 2. Based on text contents, I design exercises of multiple forms on Blackboard for in-class tests to estimate how good students master the teaching content; 3. Peer-review: Students are divided into pairs to comment on each other’s writing; 4. Combine language learning with its usage. Based on teaching contents, practical language activities were organized, such as speech competition; video exhibition, case-based discussion, and essay." The online teaching of international students creates unique challenges, but within the Chinese Language and Culture course, we view these as learning opportunities. Our reach is global, and through these innovative teaching approaches, we try to bridge our physical distance through personal attention to learning.   MOVING FORWARD Despite all the difficulties, CLE teachers have successfully and creatively converted the difficult self-isolation time during the pandemic into an active learning arena via planning ahead, adjusting teaching plans and designs, working in teams, experimenting with various online tools and platforms, guiding students to have an effective learning pace and progress, and encouraging them to be the owner of their learning. Stay calm and keep learning to be great in the time of pandemic!


“10th Anniversary Celebration of SUSTech”English Reading Contests & 2020 “FLTRP · ETIC Cup” English Reading Preliminary Contests at SUSTech

  I. Registration Deadline: Sep. 12, 2020 Please email:  wenx@mail.sustech.edu.cn with the title of “Reading contest + Your Name+ Student No.”           Scan the QQ QR code below to join the group for further information. II. Contest date and format Contest date: Early October. (Specific date will be announced after the registration deadline.) Contest format: FLTRP’s online preliminary reading contest   All contestants who successfully register for the preliminary reading contest will attend reading training provided by CLE.   Further details of training and online reading contest will be announced after the registration deadline.   III. Instructors of reading contest Xu Siqun: xusq@sustech.edu.cn Hu Yuxiu: huyx@sustech.edu.cn Wen Xing: wenx@mail.sustech.edu.cn  

“10th Anniversary Celebration of SUSTech”English Writing Contests & 2020 “FLTRP · ETIC Cup” English Writing Preliminary Contests at SUSTech

  I. Registration Deadline: July 15, 2020 Please email: zhurh@mail.sustech.edu.cn with the title of “Writing contest + Your Name+ Student No.”Scan the QQ QR code below to join the group for further information II. Contest date and format       1 . Contest date: Early August    (Specific date will be announced after the registration deadline.)      2. Contest format:          Contestants are required to complete one argumentative writing (around 500 words) and one expository/practical writing (300-500 words) within 120 minutes.          Contestants will submit their writings online. Detailed plans for online submission will be released by the end of July.   III. Instructors of writing contest Qing Liu: liuq@sustech.edu.cn Rongrong Dong: dongrr@sustech.edu.cn  Yongyang Yu: yuyy@sustech.edu.cn Ruihong Zhu: zhurh@mail.sustech.edu.cn All prize winners will attend writing training provided by CLE. Further details will be announced after the preliminary contest at SUSTech.  


“10th Anniversary Celebration of SUSTech”English Public Speaking Contests & 2020 “FLTRP · ETIC Cup” Public Speaking Preliminary Contests at SUSTech

I. Registration 1. Deadline: Jun. 30, 2020 2. Please email: liuyy3@mail.sustech.edu.cn with the title of “Public speaking contest + Your Name+ Student No.”      Scan the QQ QR code below to join the group for further information. II. Contest Day and Format 1. Contest date: Jul. 18, 2020 2. Contest format: Online contest (Prerecorded video and live Q&A on ZOOM)   Topic We live in a world that advances at an increasingly rapid pace. Humankind benefits from advancements in many areas of life. We live comfortably with the natural elements. Our homes are warm in the winter and cool in the summer. We no longer fear many deadly diseases. Even some forms of cancer are routinely cured. In some facets of our daily living, however, advancements have their negative side. Global warming is likely a result of human activity caused by burning fossil fuels to heat and cool our homes. Does every advancement create a challenge? Make a 3-minute speech to share your point of view on this issue.   Format 1. Prepared speech: Each contestant is required to prerecord a 3-minute prepared speech video on the given topic. An appropriate and relevant title should be used. Details about video making and submission will be announced after the registration deadline. 2. After playing a speech video on Zoom, each contestant will be asked two questions by the judges. One minute will be given for answering each question.   III. Instructors of public speaking contest Zhuo Li: liz@sustech.edu.cn    Matthew Jellick:  matthewj@sustech.edu.cn Al Evans:  evansa@sustech.edu.cn Xinting Zhang: zhangxt@sustech.edu.cn Yu Chu: chuy@sustech.edu.cn Yueyue Liu: liuyy3@mail.sustech.edu.cn    All prize winners will attend public speaking training provided by CLE. Further details will be announced after the preliminary contest at SUSTech.  

10th Anniversary Celebration of SUSTech: English Speaking, Writing and Reading Contests

“Uchallenge College English Competition” is China’s most influential and largest English contest held by the Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press (FLTRP), National Center for Foreign Language Education, along with Unipus and China Language Assessment. The contest consists of three sections including public speaking, writing, and reading. To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the founding of SUSTech and provide SUSTech students a platform to showcase their English language skills, the Center for Language Education (CLE) will hold university-wide English public speaking, writing, and reading contests, which are also the preliminary English contests of 2020 "FLTRP · ETIC Cup.” Outstanding contestants will represent SUSTech to compete and communicate with other college students nationwide. All SUSTech students are welcome to participate. I. Participants Undergraduates and postgraduates under the age of 35, including international students. No limitation on the number of contests for registration.  Previous "FLTRP · ETIC Cup" National English Contests prize winners awarded overseas, Hongkong, and Macao exchange programs may not participate. II. Award set-up and selection of semifinal contestants Grand prize, first prize, second prize, and third prize will be set up in the preliminary contest. All prizes will be 1%, 5%, 10%, and 15% of the total number of contestants proportionally. CLE will reserve the right of final interpretation on award set-up. All prize winners will be awarded certificates by SUSTech’s CLE. Prize winners of Chinese nationality will also be awarded electronic certificates by the FLTRP committee.  Public speaking contest: In accordance with “FLTRP · ETIC Cup” English Public Speaking Contest General Guidelines, prize winners of Chinese nationality may represent SUSTech at the provincial-level onsite semifinal. The number of the semifinal contestants shall be determined by the Provincial Organizing Committee. All international contestants may participate in the online preliminary speaking contests organized by FLTRP. Writing and reading contests: In accordance with “FLTRP · ETIC Cup” English Writing and Reading Contests General Guidelines, prize winners of Chinese nationality may represent SUSTech at the provincial-level semifinals. The number of the semifinal contestants shall be determined by the Provincial Semifinal Organizing Committee.    III. Registration deadlines and preliminary dates 2020年“Uchallenge大学生英语挑战赛”由外语教学与研究出版社和中国外语与教育研究中心联合主办、北京外研在线数字科技有限公司和中国外语测评中心联合承办,将于今年秋季在全国范围内展开竞赛。大赛包括“外研社·国才杯”全国英语演讲、写作、阅读三大赛事,是全国大学生展示和比拼英语能力最大范围赛事。 值此南科大建校十周年之际,为呈现南科大学生风采和英语能力,学校语言中心将于2020年夏季和秋季举办“庆祝建校十周年”南科大英语演讲、写作、阅读大赛暨2020“外研社·国才杯”英语三赛南科大初赛!学校将在获奖学生中选拔英语能力突出的学生代表南科大与更多的当代高校学子竞技和交流。欢迎南科大学子踊跃报名参加!


SUSTech Medical School Faculty Teaching Development Series

For the second consecutive summer, the Center for Language Education will host the SUSTech Medical School Faculty Teaching Development Series, in collaboration with the School of Medicine.  Over the course of four weeks, doctors from SUSTech Hospital, the 1st Affiliated Hospital of SUSTech and the 2nd Affiliated Hospital of SUSTech will use English as the medium of instruction to address topics ranging from "Course Objectives & Syllabus Design" to "Curriculum Development & Course Reflection", aiming to create innovative and sustainable approaches to teaching. The four-week program will be taught online, but will address creative pedagogical practices which can be transmitted into positive classroom management, benefiting teaching and student development.  Utilizing the theme of "Teaching as a Language"  the CLE and the School of Medicine believe in the positive outcomes of cross-departmental collaboration.

TA Teaching Demonstrations

  With the aim to enhance the effectiveness and professionalism of teaching assistants’ teaching skills with English as the medium of instruction, the Center for Language Education will host a series of TA Teaching Demonstrations.   34 different TAs from 10 different Schools and Colleges at SUSTech will be presenting 15-minute demonstrations, incorporating different pedagogical approaches which they learned through their teaching development program. We encourage the SUSTech community of learners to attend, and act as active participants in promoting cross-departmental collaboration.     Dates and Contact Information is listed below:  


TA Teaching Demonstrations

  With the aim to enhance the effectiveness and professionalism of teaching assistants’ teaching skills with English as the medium of instruction, the Center for Language Education will host a series of TA Teaching Demonstrations.   34 different TAs from 10 different Schools and Colleges at SUSTech will be presenting 15-minute demonstrations, incorporating different pedagogical approaches which they learned through their teaching development program. We encourage the SUSTech community of learners to attend, and act as active participants in promoting cross-departmental collaboration.     Dates and Contact Information is listed below:  

Cross-Departmental Collaboration: CLE & MEE

  Cross-Departmental Collaboration: Center for Language Education & Department of  Mechanical and Energy Engineering By: Dr. Yan Wei and Matthew Jellick Teaching encompasses more than the transmission of knowledge from teachers to students, as within a classroom, there should be a cohesive learning environment whereby information is shared, analyzed, and discussed as a group, not as individuals.  In respecting teaching as an art, we place value on not only what is being taught, but more importantly, how and why it is being taught. This semester at SUSTech, the Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering teamed up with the Center for Language Education for a series of three seminars, titled, “Engineering Teaching Development Series”.  Initiated and supported by Professor Rong Yiming and Dr. Li Yuan, the focus included topics on “Inspired Teaching”, “Teaching Through Expression” and “Interactive Teaching”, all notions which give credence to the power of teaching and how the teacher acts as a conduit of information flow; a facilitator in the classroom of learners, not necessarily a director.  Dr. Yan Wei, who spent last semester at MIT, integrating herself in the course, “Project Engineering Processes”, was able to see learning from the student’s viewpoint, where they acquired strategies and methods for successful design innovation. Working in large teams, the students designed and built working alpha prototypes of new products.  As part of the process, these teams had to identify significant product opportunities and then design solutions through the construction of high-quality models – from sketches to prototypes.  Most importantly though, the students had to develop an appreciation for the nontechnical aspects such as group dynamics, team roles and management, consensus building, and the value of communication, which are all prerequisites for successful technical innovation.  The instructor of the MIT course, Professor David Wallace, is known for his innovative, engaging, and active class exercises, and has been featured in articles on education in The New York Times and Science Magazine. With these experiences at MIT, coupled with the recent teaching development workshops at SUSTech, Dr. Yan realized that the overall teaching philosophy involved in providing students with a motivating and confidence-building learning environment is an understanding of both what and how the instructor teaches.  The most important element in design education is inspired teaching, and how passion is transmitted from the instructors to the students.  With this mindset implemented, the class will be organized in ways which students will be engaged in the topics they are learning, not just mere recipients of information. This collaboration between universities, departments, and teachers is an effective way for continuous improvement in education, not only as it applies to Engineering specifically, but for the lager realm of all STEM-related disciplines. Using the “Language of Teaching”, the Center for Language Education at SUSTech envisions continued partnerships across campus where ideas pertaining to “Inspired Teaching” are shared for the continued development of both teachers and students, and where learning is lifelong and worldwide.


Make Summer Count! Register for CLE Summer Courses


Weekly Listening and Reading Improvement Program on Blackboard

While the CLE practices the communicative aspects of English we also understand the importance of continues learning opportunities for growth in standardized tests. In an effort to support continuous development of English language proficiency, the CLE will post Listening and Reading practice examples for improvement, via Blackboard, every week during the Summer months, as they pertain to these important skills. Each Monday, we will add one of each: Listening Conversation (Mp3, Questions and Answer Key) Listening Lecture (Mp3, Questions and Answer Key) Reading Passage (Passage, Questions and Answer Key) The practice examples in this program will expand your English listening and reading proficiency that applies to both TOEFL or IELTS test preparation. These practices are for self-study, and you can practice as often as you want. If you are interested in preparing for TOEFL or IELTS exams with teachers’ systematic guidance, please check on CLE’s TOEFL and IELTS preparation courses this Summer. You are encouraged to register for any CLE summer courses via the Teaching Information System from June 15th to 19th. If you have any questions, requests or concerns, please email us at CLE@sustech.edu.cn, and we would be happy to clarify.  


Book Club Newspaper Article

  Staff English Book Club: “Trust Exercise” By Susan Choi By: Matthew Jellick Beginning in mid-February through an online platform, and culminating in mid-May finally meeting in person, myself as well as a group of 10 staff members from Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) have just completed our sixth English Book Club.  Each semester we read a different genre, while also aiming to vary the background of our authors, ranging from Asian, to African to American.  This year, we read Susan Choi’s novel, “Trust Exercise”, meeting digitally on Zoom, every-other-week, to discuss the book, it’s characters, and the complex issues at play including gender disparities, economic dichotomies, and thematic shifts which took us along for an interesting ride. Looking back to Spring, 2017 when I began this programming at my university, I am always amazed at the expanded worldview which these novels provide for our Book Club, encouraging us to see ideas through new lenses, tinted by the reflection from different points of view.  Similarly, the words of the authors allow an insight into unique ways of thinking, helping us to reexamine preconceived notions, and to think critically about situations far removed from our daily lives.  This held true with “Trust Exercise” which straddled the foggy line between adulthood and adolescence, touching upon issues of love, loss and life, and how they shape us as we grow, tethering us back to people or places, perhaps, but if examined closely, emboldening us to grow and become our own selves. Midway through the semester, I took the opportunity to write to our author, Susan Choi, and with a personability which is mirrored in many of her characters, she wrote back(!), addressing some of the questions the Book Club members had posed, speaking truth to power, not shying away, but rather beautifully articulating carefully crafted responses.  A National Book Award Winner, Ms. Choi has mastery of her words, but with a familiarity in her answers to our questions, it was as if she was sitting down for coffee with us, explaining the complexities of her novel in understanding and personalized terms.  Her letter was beautiful, and a reminder to myself that the reason I teach, is to constantly learn. For second-language learners, these books which I choose are challenging from a linguistic approach, but what I encourage my students to do is read for context, not clarity.  It is the issues which I want to challenge them, not the language, and I firmly believe that at the end of each semester, the horizon onto which they place their understanding of global topics is broadened, giving them more power to defy complacency and think in expanded terms.  The Staff English Book Club is one of the most rewarding things I do at SUSTech, and I am already looking forward to next semester, where once again we will learn through reading, sharing ideas which challenge, and growing together through words.   Shenzhen Daily Link: http://www.szdaily.com/content/2020-05/20/content_23168906.htm  

TA Teaching Development Program Week 7 Highlights

Week 7:“Enhancing Student Learning and Dealing with Learning Difficulties"    Week 7 discussed, “Enhancing Student Learning and Dealing with Learning Difficulties” which places an emphasis on positive sustainable teaching practices that can be used throughout the semester, preparing, not reacting. Enhancement of student learning varies class to class and student to student, and as teachers, we should recognize the attributes of individual students, not just the collective group. Similarly, in dealing with learning difficulties, if teachers can highlight strengths, instead of dwelling on challenges, it provides students avenues of success as opposed to misconceptions of learning directives.     Collaborative learning helps to mitigate the differences between student achievement levels within a particular class, leaning on the strengths of the students to aid each other, learning through collaboration rather than separation.   Progressive tasks not only motivate students in a given subject, but they address a larger approach to the assignment, rather than simply focusing on the outcome. Progressive tasks can be done either individually or as a group, allowing the teacher to utilize the strengths of particular students, while also giving encouragement to those who work at a different pace.     Ongoing assessment addresses changes in learning that happen concurrently with the curriculum, rather than looking at a cumulative result, retrospectively. It allows for and encourages adjustment in teaching approaches, maintaining flexibility which reacts to and addresses student learning outcomes.


TA Teaching Development Program Week 6 Highlights

Week 6:“Classroom Management"  Week 6's lesson was about “Classroom Management” and the complex role it plays in creating a positive, constructive environment for not only the students to learn in, but similarly, teachers to conduct class in.  When we speak of Classroom Management, we are talking about both tangible (example: seating arrangements) and intangible (example: realistic expectations) things, all of which go to help create a productive learning atmosphere.    Classroom Management To manage a classroom effectively, teachers must prioritize the building relationships (teacher/student and student/student), leveraging of class time for ample learning opportunities, and designing of behavioral standards which support a constructive educational learning environment.   Capability and Connection  As teachers, within our classroom, we have the responsibility to make sure students feel capable and are able to create connections.  Capability is coupled with support, so that the students are given work which is achievable.  Connections, too, are an integral part of classroom management, in that the students are part of extended relationships with both the teacher and their classmates.   Communicative Approach Using English as the Medium of Instruction is an important element of our classes, and by using the Communicative Approach, we are able to highlight the significance of real communication for learning to take place while also using interaction with students, not simply lecturing to them.

Engineering Teaching Development Series

  In an effort to promote English as the Medium of Instruction, The Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering, in partnership with the Center for Language Education will hold three “Engineering Teaching Development” Workshops: April 30th: Inspired Teaching: Transmitting Passion from Teachers to Students  (Wisdom Valley, Building 5, Room 301) May 7th: Teaching Through Expression: Delivery Strategy by Linking Theory to Practice (Lychee Hills, Building1, Room 102) May 14th: Interactive Teaching: Student Engagement Through Interactive Participation (Lychee Hills, Building1, Room 102) Hosted by CLE instructor Matthew Jellick, this series will aim to encourage teachers to create a positive teaching and learning environment, addressing constructive ideas for classroom engagement while analyzing creative methods of delivery from instructors. We are grateful for the support of this programming by Professor Yiming Rong (MEE) and Dr. Yuan Li (CLE) and view it as an integral component of promoting English as the Medium of Instruction across different departments at SUSTech.


TA Teaching Development Program Week 4 Highlights

Week 4:“Collaboration with Course Instructors" Week 4’s topic was “Collaboration with Course Instructors” and the important, ongoing commitment both must make towards a successful class.  Planning before the course starts and continued communication during the semester are beneficial to both the professor and the TA, the benefits of which can be seen in a well-constructed and well-run course.   Suggestions for TAs (before the course begins) An organized, efficient and structured plan is integral for a Teaching Assistant to consider before the course begins.  Just as Syllabus Design is constructed prior to the start of the first class, so too should planning, including communication between the TA and Course Instructor, making sure they are working together for the proper implementation of their teaching plan, to ensure the best learning opportunities for their students.   Suggestions for TAs (once the course starts) Working in collaboration with a Course Instructor, it is pertinent that the Teaching Assistant remains in constant contact throughout the semester, both as a means for reviewing what took place in class, while also making necessary adjustments going forward.  Furthermore, communication with other TAs can also help, sharing ideas as peers, and if possible, giving reviews and comments on the direction of the course.

CLE-EAP Program: Growth Through Experience

Growth Through Experience: How the CLE EAP Program Has Shifted to Online Teaching 2020 Spring Semester started in an online teaching mode unexpectedly due to the COVID-19 outbreak. It makes the semester very challenging for the CLE foreign language courses, known for their strong interactive nature and feature. Teachers at SUSTech Center for Language Education take the initiative and switch the challange into an opportunity for a more reflective and creative teaching. With 1648 students and over 130 classes, every teacher in the CLE demonstrates their intelligence, creativity and excellence in teaching and makes foreign language learning a fun and rewarding experience for SUSTech students. CLE would love to share the effective teaching practices identified with SUSTech members and teachers beyond. English for Academic Purposes As the benchmark for the Core Curriculum within the CLE Framework, the English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Program focuses on research presentation and writing skills. This prepares SUSTech students for using English as the medium of their academic achievements now, and into their educational and professional careers.   HIGHLIGHTS: Group Research Presentations Aiming to incorporate authentic practices into our curriculum has been a challenge, given the current set of online instruction, however with patience and practice, the EAP team continues to give ownership to students, creating a sustainable learning environment where the students’ needs remain at the center of our learning sphere. From Group Research Presentations to Peer-Review Research Essays, the students are encouraged to work together as a communicative team, facilitated by the instructor, while using their own strengths to follow their individualized paths. Student Presentation: Arguments for Online Learning   HIGHLIGHTS: EAP/Library Integrated Classes Collaboration with the SUSTech Library, support from the CLE, and understanding from the EAP team has gone to provide growth through experience, changing our model of instruction, but remaining true to our underlying philosophies of teaching.   MOVING FORWARD Despite all the difficulties, CLE teachers have successfully and creatively converted the difficult self-isolation time during the pandemic into an active learning arena via planning ahead, adjusting teaching plans and designs, working in teams, experimenting with various online tools and platforms, guiding students to have an effective learning pace and progress, and encouraging them to be the owner of their learning. Stay calm and keep learning to be great in the time of pandemic!


Newspaper Article: Education is Needed More, now than Ever"

  Education Is Needed More, Now Than Ever By: Matthew Jellick Critical discourse, idea sharing, and support of evidence are some of the practices I encourage in my classes, using the notion of “Teaching as a Language” to not only promote English as the medium of instruction, but also to foster a strong pedagogical approach to teaching and learning; both needed now more than ever to sustain not only our thirst for knowledge, but perhaps more importantly, our path towards it. The classroom, whether online or in a building, should always act as a conduit of idea sharing, with equal validity given to teacher and student talk, a highway of information flowing in a circular motion where there is no beginning or end. The depiction of a teacher standing in front of a classroom lecturing to diligent students reciting, without question or feedback, is rife with a false understanding of strata, for our job as educators is to shed light, not to master. This semester, our Center for Language Education is working on a TA Teaching Development Program at Southern University of Science and Technology, further developing English competency for Teaching Assistants across a variety of disciplines. Within our weekly classes, I address the TAs as colleagues, rather than students, as although I may know more about English, they know more about their specific subjects, including Engineering and Mathematics. This gives credibility to their voice during our conversations on pedagogy, and in turn, creates a student-centric classroom where everyone has an equal platform on which to share their ideas. Critical thinking is a skill which is learned through practice and plays an important role in how we value input, regardless of where it is from. The filtering of ideas through a mechanism where we identify and analyze helps us, as learners, assign weight to arguments, and then come up with our own individual understanding of what we have been told. The ability to question a teacher, for example, shows thought, not skepticism, and should be applauded as an identifier of a critical thinker. Different sources of research, and the validity of each is how we confirm the information we are getting is authoritative and can be used to support our argument, using it as a tool to make a claim and corroborate it. Education is lifelong and worldwide, and during our current set of circumstances, the positive approaches to teaching and learning are vital as we move forward. While there will be a transition back into traditional models of instruction, we should be careful to keep the students as the center of the classroom, using their knowledge to enhance discussions, giving ownership to their ideas. The best teachers are always good learners, constantly adjusting to developments through innovative practices which reflect the strengths of the students, not themselves, ensuring learning opportunities which are sustainable both inside as well as outside the classroom.

TA Teaching Development Program Week 3 Highlights

Week 3:“Course Objectives, Student Learning Outcomes, and Assessment" Week three addressed two topics which often get confused with one another: “Course Objectives” and “Student Learning Outcomes”.  Navigating the differences can allow Teaching Assistants to direct their courses effectively so that both students and teachers  have a measurable goal to strive for.   The last topic of “Assessment” then allows student achievement as well as teaching directives to be evaluated, ensuring development on both ends.   Course Objectives Course Objectives are the foundation of every class, and need to be measurable, written from the learner’s perspective.  By using Bloom’s Taxonomy, the teacher can explain different levels of learning, and how when understood, can go to build from lower-order to higher-order skills.   Student Learning Outcomes Student Learning Outcomes are statements which students should be able to not only acquire, but demonstrate by the end of the assignment, chapter, or course.  They focus on the context of knowledge skills, and help students connect learning, and can guide evaluation and assessment.   Assessment In education, Assessment is the process of gathering, interpreting, recording and using information about student responses to an educational task, and should be used to measure both student learning ability as well as the teacher instructional direction.   Each week we will share a brief review of our class, highlighting important aspects that we feel demonstrate the teaching and learning activities which benefit both teachers and students as we work along a path towards sustainable English-language instruction across a variety of disciplines.


Uncertainty to Creativity: How CLE Shifts to Teaching Online

From Uncertainty to Creativity: How SE2 Teaching Team Shifts to Teaching Online 2020 Spring Semester started in an online teaching mode unexpectedly due to the COVID-19 outbreak. It makes the semester very challenging for the CLE foreign language courses, known for their strong interactive nature and feature. Teachers at SUSTech Center for Language Education take the initiative and switch the challange into an opportunity for a more reflective and creative teaching.  With 1648 students and over 130 classes, every teacher in the CLE demonstrates their intelligence, creativity and excellence in teaching and makes foreign language learning a fun and rewarding experience for SUSTech students.  CLE would love to share the effective teaching practices identified with SUSTech members and teachers beyond.   SE2 As the intermediate course in the CLE’s SE series, SUSTech English 2 focuses on the training reading, writing, speaking and listening skills for fluent English communication, and develops students’ cross cultural skills and language study skills for their subject learning with English as the instruction medium.  Effective language learning requires active learning and high interactivity. However, interactivity is a great challenge for online classes. Teaching in an online environment, teachers need to bear in mind that interactivity is the thought process interchange through which student’s engagement and active learning takes place. Besides, teachers must spend more time on the preparation of each class, to think through everything in order to make sure the class design and content is clear and logical. Teachers in the SE 2 group have blended different ways for better engagement and interactivity in their online teaching, including various in-class and after-class activities, and multiple learning tools and platforms.  This time we'll share SE2 teachers' experiences, practices, difficulties, and stories about the online English teaching during the COVID-19 outbreak.   FOUR PHASES 1. Uncertainty about online teaching At the beginning, few teachers had experience in teaching online, and we were uncertain about the effectiveness of online teaching, and the ways of online teaching as well.  2. Struggling with online tools For the first few weeks, esp. the first two, we struggled with different platforms such as BB, ZOOM, Tencent live conferencing, Rain classroom, and different apps for recording our PPT narration and screen. It was overwhelming, at the same time, we had to think through everything carefully to ensure smooth online class teaching and learning.  3. Adjusting for learning We adjusted our ways of teaching, and of course our attitude towards online teaching. It is in fact a good opportunity for us to explore online teaching materials and methods, etc. 4. Creativity in teaching We accepted online teaching, we have tried out ways for better interactivity and engagement, and we are still learning how to improve our online teaching and make it better, also to make a possible use of it for future physical classroom teaching. MOVING FORWARD Despite all the difficulties, CLE teachers have successfully and creatively converted the difficult self-isolation time during the pandemic into an active learning arena via planning ahead, adjusting teaching plans and designs, working in teams, experimenting with various online tools and platforms, guiding students to have an effective learning pace and progress, and encouraging them to be the owner of their learning.  Stay calm and keep learning to be great in the time of pandemic! 

TA Teaching Development Program Week 2 Highlights

Week 2:“Understanding Syllabus Design and Curriculum Development” Week 2’s topics of “Understanding Syllabus Design and Curriculum Development” are a critical component of becoming a strong Teaching Assistant.  The more information students have in their hands regarding course objectives, goals, methods, classroom expectations, assignments and assessment, the more likely it is that they will succeed (O’Brian, Mills & Cohen, 2008). For Curriculum Development, examining the different steps allows a TA to understand the importance of each one individually, as well as their role within the cumulative cycle.  The necessity, efficiency and value should be noted, as well as their incorporation into Bloom’s Taxonomy, and how Curriculum Development addresses each step of learning.   Syllabus Design should be analyzed, addressing both student and teacher needs.  With a list provided (above) creative and innovative teachers should be able to create their own, for example, “Clarify the role of the course within the larger major”, “Present a clear Methodology which will be used”, and “Alert students for tools of learning”.  If we consider the Syllabus as a contract between the teacher and the student, then we need to be able to balance interest in the course with a firm set of teaching and learning parameters.   Curriculum Development is a continuous process, and something which should be addressed after every class, and adjusted after every semester.  Teaching and learning shouldn’t end when the class is over, and the same goes for the development of the curriculum, as it is a living entity which is in constant flux, and therefore, deserves continuous upkeep and adjustments.  From "Identification" to "Evaluation" there is no break in a strong curriculum.    Bloom’s Taxonomy sets the order of learning objectives into specifics, from “Remembrance” to “Creating”.  Levels of complexity as they apply to learners’ abilities must addressed, with the aim to provide opportunities at each level for students.  Reaching the "Create" strata showcases the highest level of understanding, so let's remember to be creative in our teaching approaches! Each week we will share a brief review of our class, highlighting important aspects that we feel demonstrate the teaching and learning activities which benefit both teachers and students as we work along a path towards sustainable English-language instruction across a variety of disciplines.


Switching to Online Teaching: How SUSTech English 3 Teaching Team at CLE Meets the Challenge

2020 Spring Semester started in an online teaching mode unexpectedly due to the COVID-19 outbreak. It makes the semester very challenging for the CLE foreign language courses, known for their strong interactive nature and feature. Teachers at SUSTech Center for Language Education take the initiative and switch the challange into an opportunity for a more reflective and creative teaching. With 1648 students and over 130 classes, every teacher in the CLE demonstrates their intelligence, creativity and excellence in teaching and makes foreign language learning a fun and rewarding experience for SUSTech students. CLE would love to share the effective teaching practices identified with SUSTech members and teachers beyond.   1. IDENTIFYING EFFECTIVE ONLINE TEACHING PRACTICES Online teaching is different from classroom teaching. It requires lots of flexibility, patience, and the willingness to take risks. During the process, CLE teachers keep adjusting and identifying effective online teaching practices, and have been active in sharing great ideas and techniques with colleagues in the CLE work groups, peer observation exchange, course group discussions, and course coordinator meetings. A survey on online teaching experience was conducted to collect good online teaching practices and the positive aspects of online teaching that CLE teachers will continue to use when getting back to normal classroom teaching. These could be of great value for CLE and SUSTech. Based on the survey results and CLE teachers' sharing sessions, a series of reports of “CLE Online Teaching During COVID-19 Outbreak” will be posted, featuring CLE teachers’ experiences and stories. This time, let's start from “SUSTech English 3” teaching group.   2. SUSTECH ENGLISH 3 SUSTech English 3 is the third and advanced course of the SUSTech English series in the CLE core curriculum, which equips students with fluent English communications, critical thinking, and intercultural communication skills for their study of English for academic purposes and subject courses instructed in English. In 2020 Spring Semester, 643 students are currently enrolled in this course, making it the largest group among all CLE courses. A total of 35 classes are offered to ensure the small class size and to facilitate effective language learning. 10 experienced CLE teachers work in the SE3 teaching team. Teaching such a big group of students is not an easy job, especially in the online teaching mode. We'll share SE3 teachers' experiences, practices, difficulties, and stories about the online English teaching during the COVID-19 outbreak. 3. MOVING FORWARD Despite all the difficulties, CLE teachers have successfully and creatively converted the difficult self-isolation time during the pandemic into an active learning arena via planning ahead, adjusting teaching plans and designs, working in teams, experimenting with various online tools and platforms, guiding students to have an effective learning pace and progress, and encouraging them to be the owner of their learning. Stay calm and keep learning to be great in the time of pandemic!

CLE lecturer thrives in innovative approaches to online education

The online teaching situation landed on all of us suddenly. It required lots of flexibility, patience, and the willingness to take risks. After looking at the situation, and the materials, and the resources, I quickly realized that the most important thing for me to change was my own mindset. Changing the way I thought about classes, to suit the situation was an enormous challenge because it broke teaching habits developed over many years. As I often do when faced with any new project, consulting with trusted colleagues was an early step. I shared my thoughts and concerns. We quickly concluded that perhaps the best and most important thing we could offer in our online classes was interaction. They can do independent study outside of class time, but interaction in English would be rare for them. At the Center for Language Education (CLE), communication is a core value, so interaction is a necessity. With this in mind, I designed lots of opportunities for interaction. It has led to excellent levels of sustained engagement during our time online.     Just using Blackboard was not nearly enough. I needed more. In my plans, I set up QQ groups for each section. In the first hour, the entire class is on QQ, and the second hour is on Zoom. This means that the first hour is text-based, and we can communicate through reading and writing. In the second hour, we switch to a Zoom meeting, and the communication changes to speaking and listening. Recently, I got some feedback that my class has a good pace. A Zoom meeting is a fairly good example. My general plan was to ask for a student response about every 2 to 3 minutes. I realized that I could get that down to about every 30 to 60 seconds. If I am screen-sharing some slides, I avoid reading the slides myself and call upon students to read them. After 60 seconds or so, I will stop the screen share and go back to the meeting view and speak to students “in person.” Cutting back and forth rapidly maintains a dynamic and regularly changing image in front of them. This is important in the visual medium to maintain participant attention. Regularly changing activities, differing modes of communication, and even alternating visual stimuli encourages their attention. Students must also use physical responses and gestures. If you add in electronic features available on the actual applications, there are many ways to keep a lively pace and steady engagement online. As you might expect, it was not all ice cream and sunshine. Students had problems with the online aspect (computers, phones, apps, browsers, networks, wifi signal, and battery power among the issues students would face). The real-time element confused some students who were expecting more of an independent course where they consulted a list of tasks and then did them alone. They struggled with early assignments and online deadlines. They did not know how to create a video of themselves, or video record a conversation with others.     On my end, online teaching was hectic. I often had 12 windows open on a computer and felt like an octopus as I bounced from one to another while striving to keep a good pace and rhythm with the students. Simultaneously juggling three private conversations with individual students and carrying on the main class, uninterrupted, was daunting. Because I was working from home, I never left the office. I recall one day when I finished my two morning classes, answered some student questions, replied to some urgent student emails, and managed some pressing problems on Blackboard. I got up to eat lunch and realized it was 3:30 pm. From the start, my professional curiosity drove my own learning. I learned that I was not alone. During week 5, I collaborated with a small group of colleagues to do online observations of each other’s classes. We wanted to explore what others were doing and how they were doing it. This small and enthusiastic community allowed us to learn and share without external pressure. Teaching online is new for all of us, and we simply do not see each other while working from home. Even the discussions about setting up the observations sparked a lot of conversation. Recently, my colleagues in the USA have begun online teaching. They have asked me about my process and my approach. As I answered their questions, I realized how much I had crammed into my classes over time. I reflected on the conversations and the observations that I shared with my colleagues here. It has been quite an experience. Still, I look forward to seeing my students in my classroom on campus. I hope that happens soon. My students tell me the same.   [Tips for teaching online]   Feedback from my students has been very positive. Immediately, I began to get messages from students saying they liked the class and its atmosphere. That last one shocked me. I had not even considered that an online class would have an atmosphere! Even with texting, I tried to offer something to attract their attention. I did not write, “Type ‘finished’ when you complete the task.” Instead, I would tell them, “Type the cat =^..^= when finished.” Because most of my students grew up with emojis, the ASCII art was another small detail to appeal to their interest and smile at them ( ^ o ^)/.


TA Teaching Development Program Week 1 Highlights

Week 1:Traits of a good Teaching Assistant   In Week 1, we addressed "Traits of a good Teaching Assistant" working in small groups to identity and examine what we, as teachers, want to provide for our students.  The TAs, from different departments across SUSTech, discussed not only what is important to them, but moreover, why it is pertinent to translate these positive methodologies into their own classes.   Using English as the Medium of Instruction allows our students extended opportunities to increase their language proficiency, including practice within their major STEM-related subjects. We began making a personal list of Teaching Philosophies which we can adjust throughout the program as we evaluate different aspects of constructive approaches which affect the teacher-student dynamic. Our class discussed General and Specific traits of a good TA, and came up with our own, including: Patience, Responsibility and Tools (General) and Efficiency, Interaction and Examples (Specific).   Each week we will share a brief review of our class, highlighting important aspects that we feel demonstrate the teaching and learning activities which benefit both teachers and students as we work along a path towards sustainable English-language instruction across a variety of disciplines.  

TA Teaching Development Program

To enhance the effectiveness and professionalism of Teaching Assistants' instruction skills with English as the medium, on behalf of SUSTech, the Center for Language Education in partnership with the Teaching Affairs Office, will launch the TA Teaching Development Program. Geared towards Teaching Assistants in departments across campus, this program will focus on developing English competency through a series of 8 Workshops.     CLE Instructor, Matthew Jellick, will lead students through an 8-week program, culminating with an assessment which will include each TA presenting a teaching plan as well as a teaching demonstration, both done to showcase growth in using English as a medium of instruction. "The Language of Teaching" extends beyond classrooms and benefits all departments, so we encourage you to join us in strengthening our collective teaching skills while developing our English competancy.  


TA Teaching Development Program

To enhance the effectiveness and professionalism of Teaching Assistants' instruction skills with English as the medium, on behalf of SUSTech, the Center for Language Education in partnership with the Teaching Affairs Office, will launch the TA Teaching Development Program. Geared towards Teaching Assistants in departments across campus, this program will focus on developing English competency through a series of 8 Workshops.     CLE Instructor, Matthew Jellick, will lead students through an 8-week program, culminating with an assessment which will include each TA presenting a teaching plan as well as a teaching demonstration, both done to showcase growth in using English as a medium of instruction. "The Language of Teaching" extends beyond classrooms and benefits all departments, so we encourage you to join us in strengthening our collective teaching skills while developing our English competancy.  

Author Susan Choi writes to the Book Club

  The National Award Winner for Fiction, Susan Choi, wrote a letter to our Book Club, as this semester, we are reading her novel, Trust Exercise. Speaking Truth through Beauty, Ms. Choi answered some questions members of the Book Club posed, while also highlighting underlying messages of Community, Culture, and of course, Trust. Susan Choi's letter is attached, and we encourage you to read it, shedding some light on not only our Book Club, but on the larger global community of readers.   Susan Choi's Letter to the SUSTech English Book Club


English Mock Interview Practice

This semester, the Center for Language Education is pleased to offer "English Mock Interview Practice" for both students and staff alike. Hosted via an online platform, students can practice interview techniques as they perpare for internship, study abroad, graduate school or even job applications. Strategies and tips about how to approach English interviews will be shared, along with online practice. Contact Matthew Jellick to sign up: matthewj@sustech.edu.cn

CLE Wrting Center: Spring Semester 2020

The Center for Language Writing Center will continue this semester, hosted via online platforms, in an effort to aid students (and staff!) with their writing skills. Offering assistance on everything from Personal Statements to Essay Guidance, the CLE Writing Center provides one-on-one help for those looking to either improve or revise their writing. CLE instructors Matthew Jellick (matthewj@sustech.edu.cn) and Xiao Shi (shix@sustech.edu.cn) are available to help throughout the semester, so please make an appointment via email, and we look forward to helping you along your path towards strong writing skills!  


SUSTech Staff English Book Club: "Trust Exercise" By: Susan Choi

This semester, CLE instructor Matthew Jellick will once again host the Staff English Book Club, reading Trust Exercise by Susan Choi. Hosted online through digital platforms, a group of high-level SUSTech English staff students will meet every other week to discuss this National Book Award novel, sharing the messages provided through the narrative, and how it relates directly with their own experiences. Straddling the oftentimes murky lines between adolescence and adulthood, with topics ranging from drama, anguish and love, Trust Exercise examines the dichotomy of relationships and the gap between physical and emotional maturity. This is the sixth Staff English Book Club hosted by Matthew and the CLE, continuing the aim to extend authentic language learning opportunities outside the classroom!

TIRF's 2020 MRG Competition

TIRF – The International Research Foundation for English Language Education – is pleased to announce its 2020 Masters Research Grants (MRG) competition. Grants between RMB 5,000 and RMB 15,000 will be made to successful applicants investigating a range of topics in English language education. The application deadline is Thursday, April 23, 2020 at 17:00 China Standard Time. To be eligible for a TIRF MRG, applicants must be enrolled in a masters program in a Chinese-speaking context. Further information about this grant program, including the call for proposals, application form, eligibility concerns, etc. can be found at: https://www.tirfonline.org/grants-prizes/masters-research-grants/ TIRF and its Trustees are grateful to be working in partnership with Words Up Your Way in support of the 2020 MRG competition. Please write to info@tirfonline.org if you have any questions about this announcement, or visit the link above. Many thanks in advance!


The Center for Language Education: We Never Stop on our Path Towards Excellence!

The Center for Language Education has always prided ourselves on our cohesive ability to interact with each other and with students.  From team-building collaboration to classroom instruction, our teachers work as a strong group to bring excellence in teaching to our students. Some examples are highlighted in this short video, showcasing how we model creative pedagogy both inside and outside the classroom, working together for the betterment of not only the CLE, but the larger community of SUSTech.   [video width="1920" height="1080" mp4="https://cle.sustech.edu.cn/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/CLE-Video.mp4"][/video]

CLE Jiaozi Party

The Center for Language Education is happy to host a New Year's Jiaozi Party, celebrating the end of a successful semester and the beginning of a new year! Please join us as we make tradition Chinese Dumplings, enjoy each other's company, and welcome the New Year. Food and refreshments will be provided, and we look forward to seeing you!


CLE Jiaozi Party

The Center for Language Education is happy to host a New Year's Jiaozi Party, celebrating the end of a successful semester and the beginning of a new year! Please join us as we make tradition Chinese Dumplings, enjoy each other's company, and welcome the New Year. Food and refreshments will be provided, and we look forward to seeing you!

Dr. Ivy Haoyin Hsieh from Taiwan Visits CLE

Dr. Ivy Haoyin Hsieh, the Chair and an Associate Professor in the Department of English Language and Culture from Tamkang University, Lanyang Campus, Taiwan, was invited to have a visit at the Center for Language Education from December 12th to 13th. Born and raised in Taiwan, Dr. Hsieh studied in the United States, received her Ph. D. from the University of Florida (UF) and taught at the Sam Houston State University before going back to Taiwan to live with her parents and work with local teachers and students. During her visit at CLE, Dr. Hsieh gave two talks about English teaching and learning respectively to CLE teachers and SUSTech students. On December 12th noon, Dr. Hsieh gave CLE teachers a talk titled “Literacy Activities for EFL College English Classes.” Dr. Hsieh shared her first-hand experience on using literacy activities such as “literature circle” in reading and “project-based process writing” in teaching English as a foreign language. She suggested that these activities should be implemented in college English classes as well to motivate students’ learning and to connect with their personal life experiences. CLE teachers found this talk quite motivational and inspiring, which tremendously encouraged them to explore more engaging learning opportunities for students. Dr. Hsieh also held a talk titled “Go Gators! From College football to American Pop Culture” for SUSTech students on December 13th noon. Dr.Hsieh shared her own observations and experiences living in a college town with football as part of daily life during her PhD study at UF in the U.S. She explored the questions why Americans love football so much and how football represents and impacts their pop culture. In addition to introducing surface culture by demonstrating some UF gators souvenirs, Dr. Hsieh also elaborated on the elements of deep culture relating to college football, some of which included identity, gender, and race. Following her talk, Dr. Hsieh invited CLE’s instructors and UF alumni Rongrong Dong, Qing Liu, and Zhuo Li to talk about their memory of UF football. CLE’s instructor Matthew Jellick also joined the discussion, sharing his understanding about the topic from the perspective of an American. The students asked questions and enjoyed the talk, expressing it was an exciting and eye-opening experience to learn about American culture. Dr. Hsieh’s visit was a fantastic opportunity for CLE teachers to learn and rethink how they can ignite students’ passion for reading and writing. Her talk about cross-cultural communication was an extraordinary add-on to a series of workshops on academic reading and writing by CLE this semester. Written by: Zhuo Li Photos by: Zhaoting Li, Zhuo Li


CLE Lectures on English Language Learning

Invited by the SUSTech Student Affairs Office, CLE lecturer XU Siqun gave three talks on ‘English Language Learning at the University’ for students on Nov 28th, 2019, Dec 12th. and Dec 24th, 2019. The first two talks were organized for the freshmen in SUSTech, while sophomores and junior students in School of Medicine were targeted in the last talk. On Nov 28th, 2019, Dec 12th, XU Siqun gave two talks to around 530 freshmen from Shuli College, Shuren College and Zhicheng College. He introduced the English language learning resources provided by the Center for Language Education first, and shared his experience of learning English with the students. He told students that a good learning attitude and motivation is important in college study, and the sense and habit of self-learning should be developed when entering the university. He emphasized that three aspects are crucial in English language learning, namely vocabulary, five core language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing, translating) and cultural knowledge. He recommended several books, listening materials and other English learning resources to students and encouraged them to spend more time on practicing. The talk lasted for two hours, and students put forward the questions that they face in their English study in the Q&A session. XU Siqun answered them one by one and offered a lot of useful and practical suggestions. On Dec 24th, XU Siqun gave a talk on “Standardized Language Test Preparation” to around 20 students from the School of Medicine. He offered students useful information and resources in preparing for international standardized tests such as TOEFL, IETLS and GRE. Practical suggestions on how to prepare for these tests and how to get ready for overseas study were also introduced to the students. These talks gave a good opportunity for students to understand how to upgrade their English language skills for the future study and career development. A lot of useful English learning advices are offered during the talks. The aim of these talks is to help students adapt to university study and life, and to support the development of their language and study skills for their future study and career. All the students are encouraged to visit CLE to seek the individualized support in terms of their overall study skills, or how to cope with language learning in the specific academic contexts.  

Shenzhen Daily Newspaper Article: SUSTech Reader Final Competition Held

Article Link: http://www.szdaily.com/content/2019-12/25/content_22729659.htm On Sunday, December 22nd, the Center for Language Education hosted the SUSTech Reader Final Competition. Here is an article written in the local English newspaper, The Shenzhen Daily: The SUSTech Reader Final Competition, a recital competition of Chinese poems in both Chinese and English, was concluded at Runyang Gymnasium in SUSTech on Sunday.   Twenty students who passed the preliminaries attended the competition organized by the Center for Language Education and the Center for the Arts of the university in celebration of the 70th anniversary of founding of the People’s Republic of China. Eighty-seven students applied to enter the competition. At the final, 20 student finalists from six colleges read selected Chinese poems, demonstrating their passion for the homeland and sharing Chinese culture with the world through the global languages. Xie Xinyan, a student from Zhiren Residential College, won the first prize. Qin Guoyang and Zhang Xinyi from Zhicheng College won the second prize. Chen Junting from Zhixin College, Zeng Chengxin from Shuli College, and Sun Yuze and Luo Yumeng from Shude College won the third prize. “Poem recitation is not simply imitation. The reciters need to present their own style and interpretation of the poems,” Zhao Deyun, deputy director of the Chinese Language Ability Testing and Researching Development Center, said. Zhao and nine others were invited to sit on the judging panel to evaluate the contestants’ performances in the two-round competition. In the first round, the contestants, in pairs, read the poem “The Young Chinese” by Liang Qichao (1873-1929), the foremost intellectual leader of China of the first two decades of the 20th century, and “Homeland, Oh My Beloved Homeland” by Shu Ting. In the second round, each student read a poem of their choosing in both Chinese and English. Involving ancient as well as modern titles, the poems included “The River All Red” and “Invitation to Wine, Snow, Nostalgia.” Professor Chen Yuehong, dean of Humanities and Social Sciences at the university, said SUSTech needs an international environment for exchanges on its way to becoming a world-leading, innovation-based institution. Besides science and technology, it needs arts and humanities education to cultivate students’ intellect and help make them well-prepared for the future. “Through the SUSTech Reader poetry competition, students not only present a gift for the PRC’s 70th anniversary, but also share with the world Chinese culture,” Chen said.  


SUSTech Reader Poetry Final Competition

To celebrate the 70th Anniversary of PR China, the Center for Language Education and the Center for the Arts will host the SUSTech Reader Final Competition on December 22nd, at 7:00pm in the Runyang Gymnasium.  Twenty selected students from the six SUSTech Residential Colleges will read selected Chinese poems with their passion for the homeland and share Chinese culture to the world though global languages. There will be be two rounds in the final competition.  For the first round, the finalists will read, “The Young Chinese” and “Homeland, Oh My Beloved Homeland” in pairs.  For the second round, they will read the poems chosen by themselves, including, “The River All Red”, “Invitation to Wine”, “Snow”, “Nostalgia” and many more. We cordially invite you to attend the SUSTech Reader Final Competition!

SUSTech Reader Poetry Final Competition

To celebrate the 70th Anniversary of PR China, the Center for Language Education and the Center for the Arts will host the SUSTech Reader Final Competition on December 22nd, at 7:00pm in the Runyang Gymnasium.  Twenty selected students from the six SUSTech Residential Colleges will read selected Chinese poems with their passion for the homeland and share Chinese culture to the world though global languages. There will be be two rounds in the final competition.  For the first round, the finalists will read, “The Young Chinese” and “Homeland, Oh My Beloved Homeland” in pairs.  For the second round, they will read the poems chosen by themselves, including, “The River All Red”, “Invitation to Wine”, “Snow”, “Nostalgia” and many more. We cordially invite you to attend the SUSTech Reader Final Competition!


Staff English Book Club Exhibition

This week on the first floor of the SUSTech Library is an exhibition featuring the Center For Language Education's Staff English Book Club.  Run each semester by EAP teacher Matthew Jellick, the Book Club is an opportunity for staff to explore not only the English language through authentic forms, but also to help expand their worldview as it pertains to the complex characters in our novels.  Reading books by American, Asian and African authors, we are able to explore socio-cultural contexts which extend outside traditional English-language acquisition examples, and delve into worlds beyond ours through these amazing stories taking place in settings which span our globe.

Go Gators! From College football to American Pop Culture

Go Gators! From College football to American Pop Culture Why do Americans love football so much? How does football represent and impact their pop culture? The speaker will share her own observations and experiences living in a college town with football as a part of daily life. We hope to see you this Friday noon!   Date: Friday, Dec. 13th, 2019 Time: 12:30 – 1:30 PM Venue: Rm 108, Teaching Building 1   Short Bio of Dr. Ivy Haoyin Hsieh: Ivy Haoyin Hsieh is an Associate Professor in the Department of English Language and Culture at Tamkang University, Lanyang Campus, Taiwan. Born and raised in Taiwan, Ivy studied in the United States, received her Ph. D. from the University of Florida and taught at the Sam Houston State University before returning to her home country to live with her parents and work with local teachers and students. She enjoys connecting theory and practice by taking students out of classes to do practical projects. She has been involved with GSIP (Global Service Internship Program) and GLAP (GLocal Action Practice Program) in which she took students to Southeast Asia countries and local communities to do services. Her research interests include indigenous education, multicultural picture books, TEFL teaching and learning, university social responsibilities, and qualitative research.


Shenzhen Daily Newspaper Article: "The Art of Poetry"

The Art of Poetry By: Matthew Jellick   Poetry has the power to inspire, written through emotion rather than words, conveyed through the heart as opposed to the pen.  From politics to romance, lines, verses and stanzas have, for centuries, conveyed ideas where sentences, paragraphs and essays have fallen short.  Ideologies expressed through structure; love shared through rhyme.   Poetic verse has the capacity to tell stories just like a novel, yet with a structure which demands attention, rewarding readers and listeners with a deeper sense of understanding, immersed in the words like a leaf heavy with crestfallen snow.  And similar to that overweight foliage, the language of poetry balances beauty with the absurd, with meanings taken from context, redefined through personal application, and comprehended through differences.  Poetry isn’t defined, but it does define; outlining who we are, but letting us figure out who we want to be.   To celebrate the art of Poetry, Southern University of Science and Technology is hosting the “SUSTech Reader”, where a group of 20 students will read poems which celebrate the cultural heritage of China, including such luminary authors ranging from Lei Bai (701) and Suh Ting (1952).  Recited in both Chinese and English, the students will emphasize intonation, highlight pause and stress pronunciation, all of which go to give intended power to the words of the poet.  Akin to singing, poetry dances upon musical elements, abandoning rote structure for a uniqueness which, if we look hard enough, can be found in each of our voices.   As an undergraduate, I remember taking a class titled, “Cross-Cultural Contemporary Poetry” which exposed me, as a teenager, to elements of prose I had yet to be shown.  The authors of different descent – including Chinese – allowed me into their world, through their poems, to countries, cultures and identities I had yet to take the time to understand.  But unlike a travel guide which lists the tourist hotspots of a given city, the words shared through this class allowed me into the homes and minds of their authors, providing me with an insight which anything other than poetry would have failed to do.   Article Link: http://www.szdaily.com/content/2019-12/11/content_22692948.htm    

Conference on Teaching and Learning: Sharing What Works

The Center for Language Education held a conference, with both instructors and students presenting on teaching and learning practices which work for them inside as well as outside the classroom.  The Director of the CLE, Dr. Li Yuan, gave opening remarks where she spoke of the need for good teaching practices which use English as the medium of instruction, and how this positive pedagogy can influence classrooms across campus. Following, a total of 10 teachers gave presentations on how they implement those same ideas on a daily basis, creating a learning environment which fosters sustainable educational growth not only amongst students, but for the teachers as well, continually developing as professionals, reflecting the positive attributes of the CLE. One of the highlights of the conference was the Student Poster Presentations, in which 12 students designed, created, and hosted an academic poster depicting teaching and learning strategies which work for them, not only in English classes, but across their educational spectrum.  Giving empowerment to student voices of understanding, these posters spoke to the learning strategies implemented within the CLE, which include innovative and authentic approaches to the design of student curriculum and classroom instruction. This is the second conference which the Center for Language Education has hosted at SUSTech over the past two semesters, a tradition we plan to continue going forward.  Teaching is an art which is continually developing, taking into account updates in research, student learning outcomes, and constructive teacher development.  Looking to become a leader at SUSTech for not only language development but teaching improvement, the CLE hopes to use the issues discussed at this conference to help foster continual development within the realm of teaching, extending from our center to all departments across campus.


SUSTech English I Word Power Challenge

College-level academic vocabulary is often a challenge for all freshmen in the university. To better motivate the students at SUSTech English I (SE I) classes to acquire academic vocabulary more effectively, a list of academic words for university learning was given to the students at the beginning of their first semester in the university and a vocabulary competition with the name of Word Power Challenge was designed for students to check their learning progress.   The first round of Word Power Challenge was held among SE I classes during Week 11 and the top five students in each class were selected for the final. On December 5th the Final Competition of SUSTech English I (SE 1) Word Power Challenge was held successfully. 30 SE I students selected in the first round participated in the final competition. Six of them won the 1st place, 2nd place and 3rd place prizes respectively.   Word Power Challenge Winners First Place Winner: Mingyang Mei Second Place Winners: Chongran Zhao and Changpeng Ge Third Place Winners: Feiqian Chen, Yuanjie Sun, and Houming Zhu Photo of Word Power Challenge Winners Students in the Final Competition   The initiative of the Word Power Challenge is well received by the students. They think it is both fun and challenging. It strengthens SE I students’ vocabulary proficiency and serves as a vocabulary learning boost during their first semester at SUSTech.    Qing Liu SUSTech I Cohort, CLE

Teaching and Learning: Sharing What Works

The Center for Language Education is hosting a Conference on Teaching and Learning: Sharing What Works, this Thursday, December 5th. Please join us as we discuss a wide range of pedagogical topics, touching upon issues which have proven results within the field of not only linguistic attainment but also expanded teaching strategies which can positively influence any discipline. Conference Agenda 4.00 to 4.10  Welcome Remarks from Dr. Li Yuan 4.10 to 4.30  Pedagogy into Practice by Matthew Jellick and Wenni Xie 4.35 to 4.55  Step Away from the Textbook by Tyler Horton 5.00 to 5.20  Formative Assessment in English Language Teaching: From Ideas to Action by Martina Dorn 5.20 to 5.40  Using L1 (Chinese) in L2 (English) Classes by Xinting Zhang and Jenny Hirst 5.40 to 6.00  Using OneNote as a Classroom Presentation Tool by Brian Butler 6.00 to 7.00  Refreshments 6.00 to 7.00  Student Poster Presentations on Effective Teaching and Learning 7.00 to 7.20  Read a Fiction in Class? Yes! by Rongrong Dong 7.20 to 7.40  Writing Rites Right: The Art of Authorship by Stephen Pellerine 7.40 to 8.00  Metacognitive Strategy-focused Instruction in a WAC Programme: The Impact on Performance in Writing 7.40 to 8.00  by Shari Dureshahwar Lughmani                        


Teaching and Learning: Sharing What Works

The Center for Language Education is hosting a Conference on Teaching and Learning: Sharing What Works, this Thursday, December 5th. Please join us as we discuss a wide range of pedagogical topics, touching upon issues which have proven results within the field of not only linguistic attainment but also expanded teaching strategies which can positively influence any discipline. Conference Agenda 4.00 to 4.10  Welcome Remarks from Dr. Li Yuan 4.10 to 4.30  Pedagogy into Practice by Matthew Jellick and Wenni Xie 4.35 to 4.55  Step Away from the Textbook by Tyler Horton 5.00 to 5.20  Formative Assessment in English Language Teaching: From Ideas to Action by Martina Dorn 5.20 to 5.40  Using L1 (Chinese) in L2 (English) Classes by Xinting Zhang and Jenny Hirst 5.40 to 6.00  Using OneNote as a Classroom Presentation Tool by Brian Butler 6.00 to 7.00  Refreshments 6.00 to 7.00  Student Poster Presentations on Effective Teaching and Learning 7.00 to 7.20  Read a Fiction in Class? Yes! by Rongrong Dong 7.20 to 7.40  Writing Rites Right: The Art of Authorship by Stephen Pellerine 7.40 to 8.00  Metacognitive Strategy-focused Instruction in a WAC Programme: The Impact on Performance in Writing 7.40 to 8.00  by Shari Dureshahwar Lughmani                        

EAP Workshop Series Presentations

Please feel free to review the presentations from this semester’s EAP Writing Workshop Series. The PowerPoints are listed in order below, and can be used to help you continue along the path towards strong academic writing skills.     Matthew Jellick: “Academic Essay Structure” PPT: Academic Essay Structure   Chu Yu: “Demonstrating Your Voice in Academic Writing” PPT: Demonstrating Your Voice in Academic Writing   Dr. Li Zhuo: “Summarizing and Paraphrasing” PPT: Summarizing and Paraphrasing   Xiao Shi: “Academic Word List” PPT: Academic Word List


EAP Workshop Series Presentations

Please feel free to review the presentations from this semester’s EAP Writing Workshop Series. The PowerPoints are listed in order below, and can be used to help you continue along the path towards strong academic writing skills.     Matthew Jellick: “Academic Essay Structure” PPT: Academic Essay Structure   Chu Yu: “Demonstrating Your Voice in Academic Writing” PPT: Demonstrating Your Voice in Academic Writing   Dr. Li Zhuo: “Summarizing and Paraphrasing” PPT: Summarizing and Paraphrasing   Xiao Shi: “Academic Word List” PPT: Academic Word List

CLE Writing Center Workshop Series Presentations

Please feel free to review the presentations from this semester’s CLE Writing Workshop Series. The PowerPoints are listed in order below, and can be used to help you continue along the path towards strong academic writing skills.   Matthew Jellick: “Statements of Purpose” PPT: Statements of Purpose   Dr. Brian Butler: “Bibliographic Software” PPT: Bibliographic Software   Xiao Shi: “Formal Writing” PPT: Formal Writing


EAP Writing Workshop: Academic Word List

EAP instructor, Xiao Shi, will lead this semester's final Writing Workshop, titled, "Academic Word List: Words with Meaning", which will be held this Thursday at lunchtime in Teaching Building 1. The root of all good academic writing is a strong vocabulary list, and Ms. Shi will talk about how to use these words so that they have the intended power necessary to propel your writing so it can reach strong academic standards necessary at this level and the next! Even though it is Thanksgiving, we hope that you can join us for this semester's final Writing Workshop which is guaranteed to increase your knowledge and understanding of academic vocabulary!

EAP Writing Workshop: Academic Word List

EAP instructor, Xiao Shi, will lead this semester's final Writing Workshop, titled, "Academic Word List: Words with Meaning", which will be held this Thursday at lunchtime in Teaching Building 1. The root of all good academic writing is a strong vocabulary list, and Ms. Shi will talk about how to use these words so that they have the intended power necessary to propel your writing so it can reach strong academic standards necessary at this level and the next! Even though it is Thanksgiving, we hope that you can join us for this semester's final Writing Workshop which is guaranteed to increase your knowledge and understanding of academic vocabulary!


EAP Writing Workshop: Academic Word List

EAP instructor, Xiao Shi, will lead this semester's final Writing Workshop, titled, "Academic Word List: Words with Meaning", which will be held this Thursday at lunchtime in Teaching Building 1. The root of all good academic writing is a strong vocabulary list, and Ms. Shi will talk about how to use these words so that they have the intended power necessary to propel your writing so it can reach strong academic standards necessary at this level and the next! Even though it is Thanksgiving, we hope that you can join us for this semester's final Writing Workshop which is guaranteed to increase your knowledge and understanding of academic vocabulary!

Prospectus 2020: Introducing the CLE to Local Shenzhen High School Seniors

Welcoming a group of Shenzhen High School students during their visit to SUSTech, the Center for Language Education hosted an Introductory Session whereby we were able to share with them our ideas as they pertain to education. Five teachers, including Brian Butler, Allison Dansie, Stephen Pellerine, Jennifer Hirst and Matthew Jellick were able to mingle with the incoming Freshmen, sharing informal stories as well as pedagogical approaches. Following, there was a panel discussion where the students were able to ask direct questions to all teachers at once, getting different viewpoints on critical issues. The Center for Language Education touches the academic lives of every single incoming student, and we believe that this provides us with an unique opportunity to not only train on language development, but moreover, introduce interactive approaches to methodology which in many cases, may be a new approach to learning for many students. The teachers within the CLE come equipped with experience from around the world, taking with them different global pedagogical approaches to classroom management, syllabus design and even assessment practices. With these tools, we are excited to share, teach and learn from new students every year, and through meeting these wonderful Shenzhen high school seniors, we look forward to continued partnerships between teachers and students, where we all learn from each other.


Cultural Sharing through Food

Written by: Jesse Cancelmo IV On November 14th 2019, Center for Language Education cohosted a featured cultural sharing event together with Zhicheng College. Aiming to incorporate elements of English outside the classroom, two teachers, Jesse Cancelmo IV and Tyler Horton showcased their affinity for Hot Dogs, namely one’s representative of their past. For Jesse, this was the “Chili Dog” and for Tyler, the “Colombian Hot Dog”. Not only delving into the delectable delights, there was also elements of a historical perspective involved, with a PowerPoint presentation given by Jesse which focused on the history behind his favorite Hot Dog. This includes not only its homage to his home state of Texas, but interestingly enough, references to the animated “Sonic the Hedgehog” series. Providing both a historical as well as delicious context, Jesse was able to show the students how to actually make the dogs, with ingredients including three different kinds of sausages, condiments and buns. Apart from English, food is one of the few true global languages, and this event underscored that. The students who participated enjoyed gaining cultural insight into American foods while exploring the English language outside the confines of a classroom.

SUSTech Reader Poetry Competition

To celebrate the 70th Anniversary of P.R. China and to promote the appreciation of Chinese culture and classical poetry, the Center for Language Education and the Center for the Arts jointly host the themed SUSTech Reader Competition. Please follow the link to find out more information, including registration: https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/d2UjIrJpdEjkrjTjzURyJg We welcome you to join the SUSTech Reader Competition, an opportunity for you to delve into the art of Poetry, expressing your pride through global languages.


SUSTech Reader Poetry Competition

To celebrate the 70th Anniversary of P.R. China and to promote the appreciation of Chinese culture and classical poetry, the Center for Language Education and the Center for the Arts jointly host the themed SUSTech Reader Competition. Please follow the link to find out more information, including registration: https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/d2UjIrJpdEjkrjTjzURyJg We welcome you to join the SUSTech Reader Competition, an opportunity for you to delve into the art of Poetry, expressing your pride through global languages.

Writing Center Workshop: Formal Writing - Thurs, Nov. 21st 12:30 PM

Writing Center instructor, Xiao Shi, will lead a workshop on the topic of “Formal Writing” aiming to help in the transition from spoken word to written essay. This workshop discusses the features for writing language, especially academic writing text and how we, as speakers, can effectively turn our spoken language into formal written words.  


Writing Center Workshop: Formal Writing - Thurs, Nov. 21st 12:30 PM

Writing Center instructor, Xiao Shi, will lead a workshop on the topic of “Formal Writing” aiming to help in the transition from spoken word to written essay. This workshop discusses the features for writing language, especially academic writing text and how we, as speakers, can effectively turn our spoken language into formal written words.  

EAP Workshop: Summarizing and Paraphrasing – Thurs, Nov. 14th 12:30PM

EAP instructor, Zhuo Li, will lead this week's Writing Workshop, titled, "Summarizing and Paraphrasing". Within the hour, she will speak to techniques for avoiding plagiarism and over-quoting when you incorporate other writers' ideas or words into your own writing. There will be hands-on activities to help you include sources in your work using your own, powerful words through the skills of summarizing and paraphrasing. All are invited, and we look forward to seeing you there.  


EAP Workshop: Summarizing and Paraphrasing – Thurs, Nov. 14th 12:30PM

EAP instructor, Zhuo Li, will lead this week's Writing Workshop, titled, "Summarizing and Paraphrasing". Within the hour, she will speak to techniques for avoiding plagiarism and over-quoting when you incorporate other writers' ideas or words into your own writing. There will be hands-on activities to help you include sources in your work using your own, powerful words through the skills of summarizing and paraphrasing. All are invited, and we look forward to seeing you there.  

EAP Workshop: Summarizing and Paraphrasing – Thurs, Nov. 14th 12:30PM

EAP instructor, Zhuo Li, will lead this week's Writing Workshop, titled, "Summarizing and Paraphrasing". Within the hour, she will speak to techniques for avoiding plagiarism and over-quoting when you incorporate other writers' ideas or words into your own writing. There will be hands-on activities to help you include sources in your work using your own, powerful words through the skills of summarizing and paraphrasing. All are invited, and we look forward to seeing you there.  


Staff English Corner: Tuesday, Nov. 12th (12:30pm)

Each semester, the Staff English Classes are able to participate in an English Corner, hosted by the Center for Language Education.  Fostering departmental collaboration and idea sharing in an English-conducive environment, this semester will again provide an opportunity for the staff of SUSTech to engage in this positive learning platform.  This semester's English Corner will take place on Tuesday, November 12th, at lunchtime, in the friendly confines of Zhiren College Activity Center, with Staff English instructor, Matthew Jellick, leading the activity.  In an effort to promote authentic language development across campus, we invite all staff to attend and participate, as it is a wonderful opportunity for both linguistic and professional development.

Staff English Corner: Tuesday, Nov. 12th (12:30pm)

Each semester, the Staff English Classes are able to participate in an English Corner, hosted by the Center for Language Education.  Fostering departmental collaboration and idea sharing in an English-conducive environment, this semester will again provide an opportunity for the staff of SUSTech to engage in this positive learning platform.  This semester's English Corner will take place on Tuesday, November 12th, at lunchtime, in the friendly confines of Zhiren College Activity Center, with Staff English instructor, Matthew Jellick, leading the activity.  In an effort to promote authentic language development across campus, we invite all staff to attend and participate, as it is a wonderful opportunity for both linguistic and professional development.


Bibliographic Software: Using Zotero, EndNote and other Apps to make Research and Writing much easier! – Thurs, Nov. 7th 12:30PM

EAP Instructor and Associate Director, Dr. Brian Butler, will lead a workshop on the topic of "Bibliographic Software: Using Zotero, EndNote and other Apps to make Research and Writing much easier!" Going beyond the use of these Apps simply as a way to store your list of sources, this CLE Writing Center Workshop will explore ways to use them to organize your research and writing outlines, manage your PDFs and notes, and keep everything backed up and accessible from anywhere via the "Cloud". If you want to save time, stay organized, and make your research and writing easier, please attend!  

Demonstrating Your Voice in Academic Writing– Thurs, Oct. 31st 12:30PM

EAP instructor, Chu Yu, will lead this week's Writing Workshop, titled, "Demonstrating Your Voice in Academic Writing".  Part of our four-part Academic Writing Series, this week's discussion will focus on finding the power in your voice, and translating that to the written page, through proper techniques.  Your voice matters, and when you are able to demonstrate that through academic writing, it goes to increase the level not only readability, but the underlying empowerment which your message conveys.  


Demonstrating Your Voice in Academic Writing– Thurs, Oct. 31st 12:30PM

EAP instructor, Chu Yu, will lead this week's Writing Workshop, titled, "Demonstrating Your Voice in Academic Writing".  Part of our four-part Academic Writing Series, this week's discussion will focus on finding the power in your voice, and translating that to the written page, through proper techniques.  Your voice matters, and when you are able to demonstrate that through academic writing, it goes to increase the level not only readability, but the underlying empowerment which your message conveys.  

Writing Center Workshop: Statements of Purpose - Thurs, Oct. 24th 12:30pm

EAP Instructor Matthew Jellick will lead a Workshop on the topic of "Statements of Purpose: Writing for University Acceptance", providing tips and suggestions for writing a strong Personal Statement. Touching upon the writer's identity as both an Individual as well as a Student, and incorporating aspects from their past, present and future, this Writing Center Workshop will provide insight into the structure of a strong Personal Statement, and how to write something which exemplifies the strengths you want to present.  Attendance is encouraged! Writing Center Brochure


Writing Center Workshop: Statements of Purpose - Thurs, Oct. 24th 12:30pm

EAP Instructor Matthew Jellick will lead a Workshop on the topic of "Statements of Purpose: Writing for University Acceptance", providing tips and suggestions for writing a strong Personal Statement. Touching upon the writer's identity as both an Individual as well as a Student, and incorporating aspects from their past, present and future, this Writing Center Workshop will provide insight into the structure of a strong Personal Statement, and how to write something which exemplifies the strengths you want to present.  Attendance is encouraged! Writing Center Brochure

SUSTech Medical School Faculty Presentation and Reception

Working in partnership with the SUSTech Affiliated Hospitals: Shenzhen People's Hospital #1, the Third People's Hospital of Shenzhen, and SUSTech Hospital, we will celebrate the "Language of Teaching", with presentations by the respective doctors who took part in an intensive Faculty Training Seminar this past Summer taught by the Center for Language Education, where they learned Methodological and Pedagogical practices which will aid them as future teachers of the SUSTech Medical School. We look forward to sharing how these doctors learned to translate their knowledge into teaching practices and how as educators, we can continue to make our classrooms into dynamic learning platforms, helping to propel SUSTech as a leader in Global Education, moving forward with innovation both inside as well as outside of the classroom.


EAP Writing Workshop: Academic Essay Structure - Thurs., Oct. 17th 12:30pm

EAP Instructor Matthew Jellick will lead a Workshop on the topic of “Academic Essay Structure”, informing students about the intricacies of strong writing skills.  From the opening “hook” sentence, to the “restating of the thesis” in the conclusion paragraph, we will address the organization of sentences, their role within respective paragraphs, and how, as a whole, the essay fits together.  Words have power, and when used correctly, they can inform, educate, and embolden!

EAP Writing Workshop: Academic Essay Structure - Thurs., Oct. 17th 12:30pm

EAP Instructor Matthew Jellick will lead a Workshop on the topic of “Academic Essay Structure”, informing students about the intricacies of strong writing skills.  From the opening “hook” sentence, to the “restating of the thesis” in the conclusion paragraph, we will address the organization of sentences, their role within respective paragraphs, and how, as a whole, the essay fits together.  Words have power, and when used correctly, they can inform, educate, and embolden!


EAP Writing Workshop: Academic Essay Structure - Thurs., Oct. 17th 12:30pm

EAP Instructor Matthew Jellick will lead a Workshop on the topic of “Academic Essay Structure”, informing students about the intricacies of strong writing skills.  From the opening “hook” sentence, to the “restating of the thesis” in the conclusion paragraph, we will address the organization of sentences, their role within respective paragraphs, and how, as a whole, the essay fits together.  Words have power, and when used correctly, they can inform, educate, and embolden!

Developing Creative Thinking Skills in Language Learning


Developing Creative Thinking Skills in Language Learning


Staff English Book Club

The Staff English Book Club this semester focuses on Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's seminal novel, "Americanah", a complex reading which deals with issues pertaining to the dichotomies associated with self-identity.  Race, immigration, integration, and love all go to shape the development of the characters, and how they deal with inner truth in juxtaposition to outward appearance. Meeting every other week throughout the semester, our group of 15 SUSTech Staff members will analyse, deconstruct and discuss this book, taking into account our own personal experiences as well and how they shape our viewpoint.  Gender issues transformed through the immigrant experience and notions of love defined by the past, yet looking towards the future.  This is the sixth book read within the Staff English Book Club, and it promises to bring us unique perspectives while also expanding our worldview.


Short Story Society Fall 2019

  Provided by CLE (Center for Language Education), Short Story Society is a night reading club where you can enjoy multi-genre short stories, guided discussions, friends and joy. Every other Tuesday night from 7:00-8:00, a session of reading discussion will be held in one of the library group study rooms (you will be informed of the room number through wechat group message). If you are interested in reading science fictions, romance, thrilling or detective stories, but worried a whole book reading might be too time-consuming, Short Story Society is the right place for you. We will send the story as well as the reading guide one week earlier before the meeting, you can complete the reading guide on your own (or with a friend) and bring it to our reading discussion. Scan the QR code and join us!     Here are the story and the reading guide for the first session (Sep. 17th) Reading_Bradbury ReadingGuide_Bradbury

Language Help Service 2019 Fall

CLE Language Help Service (LHS) is back for this semester! In 2019 fall, we will continue to offer CLE Language Help Service to the entire SUSTech community - students, faculty, and staff. CLE Language Help Service is a one-on-one language service, with a commitment to provide ongoing language support to our SUSTech community. The service mainly includes English writing support, speaking practice and English learning consultation for all, as well as Chinese language tutoring for international students and staff. Anyone on campus is welcome to reserve a 25-minute face-to-face session with a CLE faculty member. This semester we will continue to offer more than 60 sessions per week, beginning in  Week 2. You can use our Online Booking System to book appointments with our faculty. Below is the instruction.   How to make an appointment? Appointments should be made at least one day in advance. Visit ehall using the link “http://ehall.sustech.edu.cn/new/index.html”. Log in to the system with your CAS account. If you are using the Chinese interface, please search for “语言中心语言指导服务”. If you are using the English interface, please search for “CLE Language Help Service”. (Please refer to the attached system guide for detailed instructions.) You will then be able to enter the Online Booking System, in which you can see the timetable for the next 5 business days. Choose a session and click on it. Fill in some information and follow the instructions to complete the reservation. Prepare and print your own materials/questions/writing pieces before the tutorial and bring them with you to the CLE (Room 210, Wisdom Valley, Block 3). After each tutorial, please give us your feedback by clicking the “点评(Comment)” button and completing the questionaire.   Gentle reminder Walk-in sessions (coming without appointment) are available for time slots that have not been booked (not marked in red). You can check our Online Booking System and see if there are available time slots on that specific day. Each SUSTech member can book a maximum of 3 appointments per semester (walk-in sessions not included). If you need to cancel your appointment, please cancel in the Online Booking System at least two days before the scheduled time. If you really need to cancel the appointment within two days, please click “contact the admin”. Late cancellation (less than two days) and failure to show up for a scheduled appointment will be recorded. You will not be able to schedule a new appointment for the rest of the semester if you have 2 such records. Due to the limited time of a tutorial, the writing pieces you bring each time should not exceed 500 Should you have any questions, please feel free to email cle_booking@sustech.edu.cn. Right now, you can try to book appointments for Week 2, starting on September 9th. We look forward to seeing you at CLE!


STAFF ENGLISH 2019 FALL SCHEDULE

SUSTech Staff English classes will continue this semester!  An opportunity to increase your reading, writing, speaking and listening skills as they pertain to English language development, students are encouraged to sign up and attend, working in a collaborative group and peer setting.  The instructor, Matthew Jellick, believes that language attainment takes place in an integrated learning environment, and these classes promise to offer just that!  Dates and Contact Information is listed below:Where: Lecture Building 1, Room 407When: Intermediate: Wednesdays (12:10pm – 1:00pm) and Fridays (1:00pm – 2:00pm)Advanced: Wednesdays (1:00pm – 2:00pm) and Fridays (12:10pm – 1:00pm)Contact: Matthew Jellick (matthewj@sustech.edu.cn)

STAFF CHINESE 2019 FALL SCHEDULE

  Staff Chinese 2019 Fall Flyer


CLE Writing Center

Matthew Jellick (南加州大学) and Xiao Shi (宾夕法尼亚大学) both teach in the English for Academic Purposes program within the CLE, and have extensive experience working with students on a wide range of writing topics, including university applications, TOEFL preparation and formal essay writing.  As part of the language outreach programming of the CLE, we welcome you to make an appointment with the Writing Center. Writing Center Poster (1)

CLE Resources Introduction

CLE Rourses Flyer(1)


Mechanical Energy and Engineering in Partnership with the Center for Language for Education

By: Matthew Jellick Aiming to extend the reach of the CLE to different departments across campus, I had the opportunity to present a workshop for the Mechanical Energy and Engineering department, working with Dr. Wei Yan, and her class, “CAD and Engineering Drawing”.  Hosting a two-hour presentation which touched upon aspects of Time Management, Communication Skills and Presentation Preparation, my goal was to supplement the major assignment for Dr. Wei’s course, adding clarification to different critical aspects which make up a group presentation. Addressing issues of leadership roles within group dynamics, the class discussion focused on finding the strengths in our partners while helping to alleviate their weaknesses.  In addition, we talked about recognizing roles within our group, from speakers, to organizers, and from researches to designers.  The students provided ideas which built upon my slides, speaking of their own experiences in this particular course, and how their roles have been impacted by these varying circumstances. The Department of Mechanical Energy and Engineering is a forward-thinking group of educators, lead by Dr. Rong Yiming, and exemplified by teachers such as Dr. Wei.  Acting on behalf of the CLE’s director, Dr. Li Yuan, it was an honor to collaborate with them on this project, and I look forward to extending the breadth of our partnership going forward.   On the surface, a course about computer aided design might not have much to do with English acquisition, but when we look at it from the perspective of “Teaching as a Language”, our two departments have a lot to share, and I am grateful to be a part of this collaboration!  

SUSTech Medical Faculty Training

By: Matthew Jellick Southern University of Science and Technology continues to grow at exceptional speeds, creating new and exciting learning platforms which help define our community of learners, preparing not only them, but the greater Shenzhen area, as we move forward into a complex and exciting world of innovation and entrepreneurship.  One such opportunity is the creation of the SUSTech Medical School, fulfilling a growing need for advancements in this specialized field.  Working in partnership with local hospitals, the university is training top-level doctors as teachers in the variety of interdisciplinary studies as they apply to medicine, teaching students about the specifics of their individualized fields.  Yet teaching itself is a specialty, and an art which is constantly being refined with updated and innovative practices.  From implementing content-based instruction to developing learning outcomes, the pedagogy and methodology which goes supports strong classroom practices is something which empowers both teachers and students. Working with a team of 25 doctors over the course of an intensive summer program, SUSTech is equipping them with the fundamentals of meaningful and measurable teaching tools which can be implemented through their instruction.  Focusing on student objectives and teacher demonstrability, these local Shenzhen doctors are able to increase their comfortability inside the classroom, with the same level of expertise they hold in operating rooms. Each are professional in their approach, mirroring the same intensity they bring to the laboratory and clinic, showcasing their ability to share their expansive knowledge with incoming medical school students. A leader in global research, SUSTech understands that the ability to transmit knowledge to the students through good teaching is likewise a fundamental aspect within the arena of academia.  It is through innovative trainings such as this where teaching sustainability is recognized, acting as a multiplier for not only students, but teachers, too.  Good pedagogical and methodological approaches can shape learners’ appreciation for the materials they are being taught, and in turn, give credence to the knowledge explained by the teachers.  With the cooperation of SUSTech and these local Shenzhen doctors, the future of learning looks bright, paving a path forward as the university and the city continue to showcase leadership ideas.


CLE Writing Center Exhibition: "Writing as Expression"

The CLE Writing Center is proud to announce an Exhibition, highlighting both SUSTech student and staff writing samples which they have worked on over the course of the semester.  We invite you to visit the 3rd Floor of the Library to see some of these pieces, ranging from Poetry to Personal Statements.  Showcasing writing growth through the CLE, on Thursday evening, May 30th, many of the student writers themselves will be there to talk about their works, and the impact it had on their outlook as it pertains to their personal and professional futures.  We hope that you will be able to take a look at the exhibition at your leisure sometime during the week, and if possible, join us for the Reception on Thursday evening. Writing is a means of expression, whether it reflects a desire to be admitted to a graduate program, or simple thoughts on loneliness told through a poem.  Come and see how expressions are translated through words, and in turn, how the these students' writings have grown through the CLE.   Time and Location Monday, May 27th - Friday, May 31st: 3rd Floor SUSTech Lynn Library.  Reception: Thursday, May 30th, 6:00pm

Writing as a Tool

By: Matthew Jellick The ability to express oneself through written words, transmitted from not only our minds but also from our hearts, onto a page, takes, above all else, courage.  From applying your research into a formal proposal, or from sharing your feelings through poetry, writing is a skill that can be honed, but foremost, must come from a truth found somewhere innate, mirroring the individual who dares to share. I, myself, didn’t start writing extensively until I moved abroad a decade ago in 2009, using the pages as a platform to share my travel stories.  Interspliced with facts and emotion, I would tell about my experiences living and teaching abroad in Korea, sprinkling descriptives about the Peninsula with the feelings it conjured up in me.  This mechanism provided an outlet of expression I had never felt before, so I continued, eventually writing for local newspapers, magazines, and even peer-reviewed journals, both in Asia as well as Africa. In my current capacity at Southern University of Science and Technology, I have taken on the responsibility of lead teacher on our center’s “Campaign for Improving Writing”, in which we work with both Students and Staff on everything from Academic to Creative Writing.  In addition, the SUSTech Center for Language Education also hosts a series of weekly Writing Workshops, on topics ranging from “Practical Email Writing” to “Coherence Between Sentences”, encouraging everyone on campus to both hone their writing skillsets, be they for informal correspondence or academic purposes.  With an aim to increase overall proficiency across the university spectrum, one of our underlying goals is to be inviting, fostering a welcoming learning environment where students are motivated, not critiqued, as it applies to their writing proficiency. When I was an undergraduate student, I took a Creative Writing course, and I remember the professor telling us, that above all else, you need to be happy with what you have written - if it fits all the parameters of structure and syntax, but you’re not satisfied with it, then don’t submit it.  I learned then that writing is an extension of oneself, and if done correctly, an intimate portrayal of thought, be it a simple message conveyed through an email, or a position backed by strong research in a journal submission.  I try to convey this to my students, in the hopes that they can develop through practice, writing both for academic as well as personal growth. A link to this article in Shenzhen Daily http://www.szdaily.com/content/2019-04/24/content_21681080.htm


EAP Workshop: Synthesizing Skills- From Everyday Life to Thesis Writing


Writing Center Workshop: Revamping Your Resume (or CV)


Writing Center Workshop: Persuasion-Increasing Your Personal Power Through Writing


Beyond Tutoring and Workshops: What Language Centers Can Offer to Non-Native Speakers


Friday Photography Workshop Series

Venue: Lecture Hall, Rm 307 (一教307)

Writing Center Workshop: Coherence Between Sentences


EAP Workshop: Demonstrating Your Voice in Academic Writing

Topic: Demonstrating Your Voice in Academic Writing Speaker: CHU Yu Time: 2019-04-12   12:30-13:30 Venue: Lecture Hall 1, Room 108

Cross Culture Communication Sharing


Integrated Library Research: English for Academic Purposes

By: Matthew Jellick The English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course within the Center for Language Education (CLE), places a strong emphasis on research writing, aiming to teach students the importance of this skill, not only for this particular class, but for their extended educational careers as well.  Working in conjunction with the Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) Library, our talented librarians have created an integrated workshop which they host in the EAP classes each semester, training the students on research skills through the use of the comprehensive library databases. This semester, two SUSTech librarians, Lucy Zhou and Joey Wang gave in-depth presentations to both Freshman and Sophomore EAP students, showcasing the intricate approaches to conducing research, from online catalogs to traditional books.  Both Ms. Zhou and Ms. Wang hosted their respective workshops in English, providing answers to the students’ questions and concerns, while highlighting examples of strong research through their informative slides. The EAP students each have an argumentative research topic which they are working on through both group presentations and peer-feedback essays, and within the workshops, they were given time to practice finding journals, articles, and links to these respective areas of interest.  With the assistance of the librarians shared information, the students have been set on the right track for finding the best possible relevant sources to use in their citations and references. Aiming to make the EAP program the benchmark of the CLE, we are grateful to the SUSTech Library for their continued support in promoting learning opportunities such as these.  It is partnerships like this which highlight the benefits of cross-departmental collaboration, benefiting everyone from staff to teachers to students! Librarian Lucy with EAP students   EAP Team and Librarian"

CLE CET4 & CET6 Preparation Workshop Open for Registration

CLE is going to launch a workshop for CET-4 & CET-6 preparation. This is a 8-week test preparation workshop, starting from Week 7 to Week 14. It offers a 2-hour session on test-taking skills and relevant excises each week. Based on the five modules of the CET test, listening, speaking, reading, writing and translation, the workshop introduces strategies proven to be effective by many teachers and ex-examinees. Throughout the workshop, you can improve your efficiency and accuracy in answering questions. It takes two steps to sign up for this workshop: 1. Sign up through the following link: https://www.wjx.top/jq/35768137.aspx (or scan the QR code below) 2. Complete an online mock test by logging in to iTest system (https://itestcloud.unipus.cn/), use the class code 39EU6T (for CET-4) or WLEKKM (for CET-6) to join a class and finish the mock test. A system user guide is attached to this email. The deadline for registration is March 27th. Please note that you need to complete the online mock test if you want to sign up for this workshop. Workshop Schedule: CET-4: Tuesday 19:00 to 20:50 (Week 7-14) CET-6: Wednesday 19:00 to 20:50 (Week 7-14) Location: Room 203, Lychee Hills Building 1 All undergraduates are welcome to sign up and join. Should you have any questions, please send email to cle@sustech.edu.cn. Look forward to seeing you!


SUSTech CLE Conference on Teaching in English: Call for Proposals!

Center for Language Education is to hold a CLE Conference on Teaching in English on Saturday May 4th. This conference aims to bring together both English teaching professionals, and teachers of all disciplines who use English as their medium of instruction—from SUSTech and the greater Shenzhen area. With this year's theme Old, New, and Creative Methodology, we aim to share and learn about the methods that make your classroom effective and engaging. We hope that our SUSTech faculty will submit proposals to present. We welcome you to share the things exciting you have done in your classroom to accommodate students who use English language to acquire their subject knowledge and skills. Details on the conference and submission can be found on the attached posters. Deadline for submission is March 29th.   If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please scan the QR code to submit, or follow the link https://www.wjx.top/m/35032275.aspx

Staff Chinese Class Has Been Successfully Launched

The spring semester staff Chinese class, a survival level conversation-based Chinese language course offered by CLE, has been successfully launched this February. With many faculty and staff from more than 7 countries enrolled in class, staff Chinese classroom is full of learning vibes and joy.   Though this course teaches very basic Chinese language to international faculty and staff, it is aimed to solve their practical language problems in many different life situations. For example, shop for grocery, order food in a restaurant, get your favorite coffee at illy’s, or have a perfect haircut at a barber shop.   For foreign faculty and staff to enjoy Chinese local life and culture, communication is a vital part. Staff Chinese class is not only providing basic language skills, such as self-introduction, expressing gratitude and apology, or launching casual talks, but also trying to acquaint our foreign faculty and staff with cross-cultural awareness under Chinese social context.   According to course lecturer Rongrong, this staff Chinese class can also be very customized. Each class, she invites students to share some daily situations where specific Chinese expressions are in urgent need. Any specific Chinese language requests are welcome in her class. She says she will try to fabricate these situations into her future course design.   Source: Rongrong Dong


CLE Staff Chinese Class Spring 2019

Welcome to Staff Chinese class spring 2019! This course is a survival level, conversation-based Chinese language class. It is designed to help foreign staff/faculty deal with simple Chinese language use in your daily life and work situations. You'll get a basic grasp of Chinese listening and speaking skills during the semester. You are also welcomed to bring any specific request of language use into class. For more details of course time and place, please see the poster. Come and join us!

CLE Staff English Classes in Spring Semester

The new year is upon us, with Spring not far behind, and this means that it is the beginning of another Semester of Staff English Classes. Matthew Jellick will continue to be the instructor as we work our way through Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking activities which will help you improve upon your English-language acquisition. Classes are divided up into three levels, including: Elementary, Intermediate, and Advanced. They will be held in Room 407 of Teaching Building 1, with specific days/times for each respective level found on the attached flyer. On behalf of the CLE, Matthew looks forward to seeing you soon, and promises a great Semester. The specific days/times for each respective class can be found here:


SUSTech Held 2019 FLTRP English Debating Winter Camp and 1st Canton International Tournament

From 18 to 22 January 2019, the 2019 FLTRP (Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press) English Debating Winter Camp and the First Canton International Tournament, sponsored by Center for Language Education (CLE), was successfully held at SUSTech. 148 undergraduate debaters from other Chinese universities and 4 invited overseas debaters gathered at SUSTech for this event. This event was organized by Chief trainer and adjudicator Hao Xiaowei, who is an FLTRP English debate training consultant and the champions of many international English debating competitions. He also invited more than 10 top debating trainers and adjudicators from Hong Kong, Macau, Singapore, Malaysia, and the Philippines to the trainer-judge group of this tournament. At the opening ceremony, Dr. Li Yuan, CLE Director, warmly welcomed the trainers and debaters from afar, and wished the debaters success in the training and tournament. Welcome speech addressed by CLE Director, Dr. Li Yuan Camp opening announced by FLTRP Debating Winter Camp Chief Trainer, Hao Xiaowei   This training combined theoretical training with group practicing. It not only started from the hot and difficult social issues, but also conveyed the basic rules, forms, strategies and skills of British parliamentary debate. In addition, several top debaters, either Chinese or overseas, conducted debate demos and commented on them in detail. CLE Lecturer Dr. Liu Lisha, Convener of the Canton International Tournament, said such training methods would develop students' thinking and English speaking capacity, and thus equip them with extraordinary English debating skills. A well-known FLTRP international debating trainer was conducting debate training   Our student debaters Wang Jiuzhou, Liu Yixuan and their coach Liu Lisha   Finally, the team from International Islamic University of Malaysia and Guangzhou University won the Novice and Open tournaments. Our students Wang Jiuzhou and Liu Yixuan had very good performances at the Camp and were awarded “Excellent Trainees”. After that, they applied the debating strategies they learnt to the tournament and ranked high among 76 teams with excellent English and sound logical analysis. They both won “Excellent debater” awards. The FLTRP Cup National Debating Competition started from 1997, which is one of the most influential English competitions for college students. Through hosting the Winter Camp and the first Canton International Tournament, CLE tried to not only arouse SUSTech students' interest and potential in English Debate, but also encourage their innovation, practice and teamwork. We hope these can better help our students develop their critical thinking skills and satisfy their demand of broadening international horizons in English learning. Source: Center for Language Education Proofread: Chris Edwards

SUSTech Staff English Movie Day: “Isle of Dogs”

Continuing with an English-language learning opportunity I began last year with my Staff Students, this past Sunday we went to see an American movie, Isle of Dogs.  About 25 students participated, including some who brought their friends from off-campus, as we met at a local theatre to watch the new stop-motion animation, directed by Wes Anderson.  Last year we saw the Academy Award Winning, La La Land, both great experiences to share culture and language outside of the classroom. Trying to build a community of learners which meets more often than our prescribed weekly classes, my goal is to foster authentic learning environments that incorporate not only English but also western approaches to knowledge.  Vocabulary memorization is fruitless without context but encouraging exposure to language though a creative storylines gives new meaning to words and different approaches to thought.  In each of the respective films we have seen last semester and last weekend, deeper meanings can be found beyond the Jazz music or barking dogs; elements of Western filmmaking which incorporate the English language, but, in both cases, don’t rely on it. Isle of Dogs is far from a conventional film, not only because it uses intricate puppets for its characters, but from a linguistic viewpoint, in the way it pulls the strings of language.  To say the film is entirely in English would shortchange not only the Japanese language but also the Japanese culture which sets the tone.  From the opening scene with Taiko Drumming to the deadly Wasabi which kills the opposition party candidate Professor Watanabe, the director sprinkles about subtle messages while keeping a defining plot line and character development.  Yet it was the English dialogue which drew me share this movie with my students but like the ending of La La Land where everyone doesn’t live happily ever after, it was the complex nature of the film’s message which I think was the ultimate takeaway. The staff students themselves seemed to understand the complexities of the film, as we were able to discuss it afterwards, continuing our afternoon at a nearby café.  Questions about the motives of the villain, the scheming Mayor Kobayashi, and his plans to eradicate dogs completely from the dystopian near-future of the fictionalized Megasaki City, were profound in their understanding of the films directive yet the smiles on their faces also told me they had a good time.  This is the impact which learning can have and which I try to nurture through outings such as this. It is my goal to continue this activity next semester, and hopefully an equally good film will pass though Chinese cinemas, allowing us the opportunity.  Yet what I have found with these past two Staff English Movie Days is that it is not necessarily the language which promotes interest, it is the experience of the collective community of learners which brings us together for an afternoon of education disguised as fun.


SUSTech Staff English Book Club: Anchee Min’s “The Cooked Seed”

One of the best teaching and learning opportunities I have been a part of during my time at Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) is the Staff English Book Club.  For the second consecutive semester, my students and I have successfully read an advanced-level novel, addressing both linguistic skillsets as well as cultural dynamics through our bi-weekly meetings where open discussion and inspired dialogue foster unconventional education. Last semester we read Peter Hessler’s “River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze” which highlighted an American male’s perspective of living and teaching in rural China during the 1990s.  This semester, in an aim to see a different viewpoint, we read Anchee Min’s “The Cooked Seed: A Memoir” which describes a Chinese woman’s migration to the United States in the 1980s.  Both books have painted the countries of China and the US through the lens of their respective authors, giving insight into the hardships encountered and enjoyments revealed, showcasing language as both a barrier and a bridge. The Cooked Seed begins with Anchee Min descending into Chicago’s airport to begin her journey, in possession of neither money nor an education to assist her as she looked for a new start, convinced she had “no chance to sprout” back in Shanghai due to her age and occupation.  Throughout the story, sadness and hardship are underlying themes, extending from dubious financial transactions, ignorant racists remarks, and a complicated love life.  Yet what rises from within the beautifully-written 340 pages is the notion that hope helps to overcome, having paved Anchee’s path with lessons learned and dreams deferred. For the staff who are in my class, the Book Club offers a unique perspective on language acquisition.  Liu Yuling, from the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, says, “The Book Club is important to me because it is a gateway to English culture and literature. The Book Club shows us global culture – something which Shenzhen needs – while also cultivating good learning habits: to read, think and learn more!” This semester too, both my parents and sister read along, with my parents joining us in person during their trip to China, and my sister using Skype to relay her thoughts on the book during a recent webcast from the United States.  Touching upon issues which stretch beyond individualized cultures, and instead expand to include the global world, it was interesting to hear the comparison of different viewpoints within our international classroom, with both China and the United States represented by different readers. The Staff English Book Club offers a unique way to not only practice English, but to likewise understand the contexts in which language gains it’s sociocultural importance.  Learning opportunities such as these are an important mechanism to extend beyond the walls of a traditional classroom situation and learn about the global settings which define who we are, regardless of where we come from.

SUSTech Staff English Book Club: Robert Pirsig’s “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance”

For the third semester in a row, I am hosting an English Book Club, run in partnership with 15 Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) staff members who are dedicated in their creative learning approaches to language acquisition.  Every two weeks, about 100 pages of reading is assigned before meeting on Thursdays at lunch to hold an open discussion on not only what we read within the book, but how those ideas translate to our own personal experiences.  Dedicated and motivated, the members of the SUSTech Staff English Book Club area a testament to not only the collective efforts of the university but also to the individual ambition of each of these colleagues who dare to scratch beneath the surface of the words and express themselves in a constructive learning environment. The past two semesters we have read, Perter Hessler’s River Town and Anchee Min’s The Cooked Seed, respectively, each describing the dichotomies of cross-cultural integration into differing societies, from America to China and vice versa.  Taking a completely different approach this time, I chose Robert Pirsig’s Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance which doesn’t deal with Sino-American complexities, rather addressing the “Metaphysics of Quality” through the story of a family motorcycle journey across the US Midwest.  Daytime rides through the plains set the table for nighttime discussions about “quality of life”, and how it pertains to our narrator, and in turn, each of us. The members of our Book Club bring with them a unique set of personal circumstances which underscores the intricacies of our discussions where prompts seemingly flow from one to another, forming a stream of consciousness which is highlighted by the book’s narrative.  Careful to understand that there is no “right answer” in our biweekly deliberations, respect for other’s opinions is a key facet of our meetings, where group participation leads to constructive dialogue.  There are some members who are joining the Book Club for the first time while there are others who have participated in the past two groups, yet each encourages with support which goes to benefit everyone involved, regardless of their English skillsets. Early in the book, Pirsig writes, “[w]e want to make good time, but for now, this is measured with emphasis on ‘good’ rather than ‘time’ and when you make that shift in emphasis the whole approach changes.”  I brought this sentence up at our first meeting, questioning the relationship of “good” and “time” and the effect each has on our lives.  The subsequent discussion which ensued served as an example of why I chose to volunteer my time with these Book Clubs: intelligent conversation shared among university colleagues which stretches beyond prescribed textbooks into a realm where creative thought and expression is fostered.  The SUSTech Staff English Book Club provides this opportunity every semester and it is my hope that we are able to continue to explore the boundaries of non-traditional narratives and the relationship the stories have on our own experiences as individuals.


SUSTech Staff English Book Club: Kristin Hannah’s “The Great Alone”

Each semester I host an English Book Club for the Staff Students at Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech).  This is the fourth consecutive semester we have done so, broadening our collective worldview through the cultural and linguistic challenges which these English novels pose.  Meeting biweekly to discuss the themes which are raised within the pages, there is a minimization of structure, whereby discussions revolve around impulse coupled with interest.  No parameters have been set to either limit or push conversation, not fencing in, or out, any ideas which wish to be shared.  I can say that without a doubt, it is my favorite activity I do within the scope of my job, as I embrace this practice of collaborative idea sharing though authentic language learning. This semester’s book is Kristin Hannah’s, The Great Alone, a story which “weaves together the deeply personal with the universal.”  Set in Alaska during the 1970’s, it approaches issues such as isolationism of self, feminist identity, family dynamics, and complex interpersonal friendships, all creating a story which mirrors the multifaceted nature of our own reality.   None of this is simple, and we would be lying to ourselves if we said it was.  And through Hannah’s characters, including their interactions with each other, we are reminded that life poses a series of questions, oftentimes asked by ourselves, while at other times, tested by those with whom we cross paths. There are 12 members in our Book Club, including myself, but just as everyone else, I do not play the role of “teacher”, rather, am an equally active participant reading along and sharing ideas.  Through our biweekly interactions, a leader is not necessary, as everyone involved has a high degree of English ability, and more importantly, an understanding of the intrinsic nature of human complexity.  Life in Alaska during the Winter is not easy, and the characters are tested both physically and emotionally, forming new relationships while questioning others, all in an attempt to simply make it through.  This is the paradigm of life, and Kristin Hannah beautifully illustrates it through her words, painting a picture which extends outside Alaska, and into each of our own personal orbits. The Book Club provides an opportunity for students to utilize their English acquisition through a platform which doesn’t place an emphasis on standardization.  We are all individuals with unique sets of circumstances which have brought us to where we are and who we are today.  To try and measure that through inauthentic means would be unfair to both ourselves as well as the book.  It is not the words, but rather the underlying meanings which help us identify with the characters in the novel, each with stories of their own which have gone to shape their identity.  The same is true of each of the Book Club members, and I am grateful for their participation, reaching beyond traditional learning approaches and embracing truth as it pertains to education.

CLE010. English for Engineering (2 credits)

This course is going to apply engineering content-based instruction to meet the needs of language study of student engineers. In the course, English learning will be realized mainly by studying STEM articles and solving practical questions in real circumstances through students' second language, English. This course covers language for discussing and applying key engineering concepts, and skills such as working with drawings, describing technical problems and discussing dimensions and precision. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.


CLE011. Exploring Society, Technology & Culture through Multimedia (2 credits)

The goal of this course is to combine the students' knowledge in science and technology and their interest in multimedia with a focus on technology, inviting them to use the language of English to communicate their understanding about society, technology, and culture.  This course will help students to improve their English proficiency and make them able to communicate with others effectively. The course encourages students apply their knowledge of science and technology to study but should not be confined to those theories. They will focus on exploring the relationships among technology, culture and society so that their professionalism and humanistic literacy can be enhanced. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic  Purposes.

CLE012. Scientific and Technical Translation (2 credits)

This course is intended for students who are already familiar with scientific and technical concepts and those who have a good knowledge in both English and simplified Chinese languages. The course will combine basic translation theory with practical translation. In the basic translation theory, students will learn basic concepts of translation, principles for understanding meanings, effective Chinese expressions, types and features of typical scientific and technical documents. The practical translation element will focus on written translation, from English into Chinese, of technically complex texts from the domains of biology/chemistry/biotechnology; these may include extracts from scientific papers, patents and popular scientific texts. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.


CLE013. English Pronunciation (2 credits)

Pronunciation is an essential component of oral communication and communicative competence. This course is designed to help students improve the intelligibility of their English speech and build confidence in communicating in English. The primary focus of the course is on the suprasegmental features (i.e., stress, rhythm and intonation) that are known to have the greatest impact on the comprehensibility of the learner’s English. Discrete English consonant and vowel sounds will also be covered throughout the course, with an emphasis on the sounds that are most difficult and problematic for native speakers of Chinese and other Asian languages. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.

CLE014. HSK Preparation Course

This course provides language training in Mandarin Chinese to second/foreign language learners and helps students to better understand the Chinese Proficiency Test HSK at level 3 and level 4, especially for the Internet-based HSK Test. The course provides students with trainings cover all fields of the HSK syllabus and exams of real past tests. Students will learn about the complete testing process and achieve self-assessment of their language competency. The teacher will also help students to identify their weakness and pull exercise from real tests targeting the weakness. The course also provides practical materials and efficient learning strategies in oral skills of real life setting as well as culture immersion training. Prerequisites: Elementary Chinese II.


CLE015. TOEFL Listening & Speaking

Our course targets students who plan to take TOEFL as their preparation for their further study abroad. Students will learn the strategies and skills in TOEFL, get familiar with the test format and evaluation criteria. Students will start with relatively simple task and as their skills and strategies get stronger, they will be able to tackle more difficult problems in TOEFL test. The materials for this course are sourced from internationally authorized textbooks for TOEFL preparation. Timed tests will also be given to monitor students’ learning process.Students will be exposed to sample speaking situations, useful expressions and tactics for each speaking question including in-class and homework speaking practice.

CLE016. TOEFL Reading & Writing

Our course targets students who plan to take TOEFL as their preparation for their further study abroad. Students will learn the strategies and skills in TOEFL, get familiar with the test format and evaluation criteria. The materials for this course are sourced from internationally authorized textbooks for TOEFL preparation. Timed tests will also be given to monitor students' learning process. Students will know how to complete reading passages with a high accuracy rate and become more familiar with phrasal verbs and idioms. They will also be more confident of writing an essay in under 20 minutes as a result of provided hints and outlining strategies.


CLE017. IELTS Preparation (Listening and Speaking)

This course is designed for those students who prepare to take the IELTS Academic Test and for those who are eager to polish their listening and speaking skills. Limited listening and speaking skills can result in a poor IELTS score and undermine students’ opportunities of being admitted to top universities around the world. This course will explore the IELTS Academic test, especially for listening and speaking. The instructor will analyze test papers of each task type, and help students enhance their listening and speaking skills as well as specific test-taking techniques. The IELTS Preparation (Listening and Speaking) will provide students with IELTS Academic Test instruction, test types analysis, listening and speaking topic analysis and test-taking strategies.

CLE018. CET-4 Preparation

This course aims to help students to improve their performance in CET-4 exam. Consequently, it introduces four major modules of CET-4 and some listening & reading strategies, such as note-taking, skinning & skimming, identifying main idea & specific information and guessing word meaning. Besides, students are supposed to master vocabularies required in the syllabus and use grammar appropriately in their writing. After successful completion of this course, students will be able to produce different types of English writing in limited time, grasp specific information and the main idea of the given listening material, comprehend the given text and detect the topic, main idea and specific information and grasp translation strategies to process translation between Chinese and English.


CLE019. Critical Thinking & English Debate (2 credits)

This course aims at training participants' critical thinking skills and facilitating their understanding of the BP debating basics. By the end of this course, participants will understand basic principles of BP debate format, acquire English debating skills, and be able to think critically about influential and controversial issues. It will also help participants prepare for the ‘FLTRP Cup’ National English Debating Competition. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes. Achieved CET4 580/CET6 550/TOEFL 90/IELTS 6.5 (Transcripts or course records are needed.)

CLE020. 美学与视觉文化 (Aesthetics and Visual Culture) (2 credits)

Aesthetics and Visual Culture is a culture course about the nature, history, and meaning of “beauty” that promotes a discussion of theoretical texts and primary works of art from various disciplines and sources on this topic: classical texts, art treatises, fine arts, media spectacle, multicultural manifestations of aesthetics, technology. SUSTech Masters and/or PhD students will learn the evolution of the concept from ancient art, where the idea of beauty was based on sensory perception (aiesthesis in Greek), to Modern art, where art schools began to define the standards for the appreciation of visual aesthetics, up to contemporary culture, where mass market and globalization and have shifted the meaning and place of aesthetics in our everyday life. The course will provide answers to questions, among others, such as: what can aesthetics contribute to ecology, or engineereing, or other disciplines? How can art affect our understanding of cultures and societies? How has the current exposure to multimedia changed our notions of the “beautiful”? At the end of the course, students will learn to compare Chinese aesthetics to the Western one, to assess an artistic artifact, and to judge better what is “valuable” and “beautiful” in our current global culture. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.


CLE024. 美国文化 (American Culture) (2 credits)

American Culture is a cultural studies course for SUSTech students who aim to acquire a deeper international perspective on Western Culture, particularly Anglo-American. This course will expose students to the most prominent US scholars and writers from the 19th century to the present, and it will discuss concepts and ideas that represent the foundations of American culture, such as independence, individualism, frontier, freedom, optimism, capitalism and many others. The course will examine a variety of texts, from political essays to novellas, from Presidential speeches to short stories, from documentaries to visual artifacts and economic reports, with the purpose of clarifying what these concepts mean historically, why they are so important, and how they have evolved. At the end of the course, students will be able to understand better their own relationship to another civilization. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.

CLE025. 二十世纪电影 (Film in the 20th Century) (2 credits)

Film in the Twentieth Century is a disciplinary course for SUSTech students who aim to learn the art of film from a historical, theoretical, and analytical perspective. The course will offer: an overview of the development of film art and technology in the West; a review of the work of major filmmakers to date; an interpretation of, and commentary on, the most relevant movies of all times; an explanation of how a movie is conceived, structured, narrated, and delivered to us; a comparison of film with other arts and languages. Students will engage in an academic discussion about the importance and the influence of film across societies and cultures. At the end of this course, students will become fluently conversant about major film traditions and productions worldwide. Additionally, they will be aware of the relationship between art, industry, and consumerism and understand the myth-making process of celebrities and its relationship to society. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.


CLE026. Scientific Writing (2 credits)

This course aims to demystify the writing process of scientific writing and introduce the fundamentals of effective scientific writing. The course will be presented in three parts: part (1) teaches students the fundamentals of scientific writing, part (2) teaches students how to write different parts of a scientific manuscript, and part (3) teaches students how to improve scientific manuscripts. Instructions will focus on the process of writing. In this course, participants will also learn how to analyze and summarize and be taken through the preparation of an actual scientific manuscript. Students taking this course will be asked to complete some short writing and produce a scientific paper. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.

CLE036. Career Development for the International Employee

This course will focus on writing as well as speaking interactions in professional settings for students who are close to graduation. The nature of the course will be English for Specific Purposes, or English for Business. The course will emphasize writing and speaking skills, though reading and listening will be integrated naturally. Presentations will also be of high importance. Students will have the opportunity to hone their presentation skills, and will benefit from guest speakers as examples of presentation skills. Guest speakers will also provide valuable experience and insight into global business. Students in the course should have an intermediate to high level of English (B2-C2). All of this will be centered on international professional cultures to prepare students for the global workplace. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.


CLE037. 英语应用语法 (Applied Grammar) (2 credits)

Applied Grammar is a grammar class for high intermediate English learners that desire to continue their study and application of grammar rules in their academic writing, and in the editing of that writing.  The goal for the class is to re-visit higher level grammar rules and constructs for the learners to more accurately identify errors in their own writing, and perfect and enhance their current writing skills of academic literature.  While the emphasis is on grammar as it pertains to writing, the class will also include exercises to improve academic reading and comprehension, as well as one project in presenting academic material. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.

CLE038. 科幻小说中的科学 (Science Through Science Fiction) (2 credits)

Science Through Science Fiction is a course in which students will analyze common themes from science fiction literature and film and explore how those themes serve as a lens to examine actual scientific disciplines. The course will cover issues such as genetic manipulation, color blindness, surrogate pregnancies, species extinction, conformity, equality, hunger and feeding the masses, neuro-manipulation of memories, and more. Students will develop vocabulary in physics, biology, mathematics, and the general sciences through the close analysis of not only a science fiction novel, but journal articles, book excerpts, podcast interviews, and film. Students will apply this newly acquired vocabulary to both speaking and short writing assignments so that successful English language strategies are practiced through the synthesis of science fiction and real science. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.


CLE039. English for Career Development (2 credits)

Lecture, 2 credits, 2 hours per week. Pre-requisites: CLE030 EAP or CLE003 EAP III or GE2000. This course begins with a basic introduction to the global nature of the modern workplace, and then works to build English abilities for students to succeed using English for business. Topics covered include: writing résumés, socializing at work/networking, interviewing, and presentation skills. English reading, writing, listening and speaking and grammar skills will be integrated into the course.

CLE040. Professional Development in Graduate Studies

The Professional Development Course for Graduate Studies will assist students to apply for graduate studies in an English Medium University and teach them skills and strategies to be successful graduate students. The application process for graduate study is complicated and difficult and mistakes during the application process can be the difference between acceptance or rejection to a program. To give students at SUSTech the best opportunity to further their studies abroad The Professional Development Course for Graduate Studies will engage students in the real life skills of the application process and teach them writing, listening, speaking, and some reading strategies. At the end of this course students will have completed the application process for graduate study and gained important intercultural communication skills and strategies to be successful in their future studies. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.


CLE041. English for International Academic Conference (2 credits)

This course is to help students with ability to write academic paper correctly and make presentations with less difficulty. Even though this is not a writing course, to ensure good results, the following exercises are assigned: the writing of an abstract and an introduction to a paper based on any paper students have written, a complete paper for a conference with emphasis on correct format and style, the writing of a presentation script, and the making of PPT slides. If class size is so big that students’ correction becomes an overload for teachers, they may selectively make corrections of their papers. Students’ grammar and usage errors or problems should be summarily pointed out in class for students to avoid. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.

CLE042. The Science of Harry Potter (2 credits)

Lecture, 2 credits, 2 hours per week. Pre-requisites: CLE030 EAP or CLE003 EAP III or GE2000. This course examines the connections between science, magic, and fantasy through the lens of one of the most famous series of fantasy books ever written — Harry Potter. Using the novel, audiobook, podcasts, film, Ted Talks, and scientific essays, this course will develop students’ English through research, discussion, and analyses of both the historical and future connections between the world of science and magic. Questions such as “Could the famous Hogwarts sorting hat be explained through the neuroscience of brain imaging?” and “How can our biological understanding of taste explain Bertie Bott’s every flavor beans?” are just a tiny sampling of how the course will use both fiction and reality to build students’ critical thinking skills as well as English vocabulary, research skills, listening ability, and speaking fluency.


GE2229. Public Speaking (2 credits)

Globalization in this information age requires that scientific researchers should not only make innovations but also effectively to communicate about their research with others. As Melissa Marshall, a senior lecturer of communication skills to scientists and engineers at Penn State University, states that “science not communicated is science not done,” the importance of improving scientific researchers’ communication skills can never be underestimated. The goal of this course is to promote science and technology undergraduate students’ public speaking skills. With an emphasis on application of content, this course requires students learn to deliver effective speeches and presentations through applying the principles learned in class. Students need to read and comprehend a variety of materials, including video lectures, book chapters, journal articles, academic papers, news, and etc. The course delivery is modified to a blended course format using “flipped classroom” model and integrating MOOCs. The online teaching platform “Sakai” is used for the online components, including each week’s reading materials, video lectures, and discussion questions. Students are required to finish reading and view videos before class meetings, while in-class time is devoted to group discussions and class speeches/presentations. Class assignments include but are not limited to: extensive reading, video lectures, online and in-class discussions, oral presentations, and written reading response. Performance assessment of students will be based on attendance, assignments, class speeches/presentations, and participation.Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.

GEL006. Communication Skills (2 credits)

The course of Communication Skills is one of the Specialized Direction Courses for students in various majors and conducted in bilingual languages. The course mainly introduces the fundamental concepts and principles of communication in context of internationalization. The main contents of the course are the foundations of successful communication, and application of three-step writing process on letters, memos, e-mail and other brief messages. Meanwhile, it applies the methods on how to prepare reports, oral presentations and employment messages and interview for job. Prerequisites: English for Academic Purposes III or EAP or English for Academic Purposes.


GELS01. IELTS Preparation

This is a test preparation course intended for learners who have an intermediate to upper-intermediate level of English. It will prepare them to sit the IELTS academic exam and help them to polish the primary language skills and develop the confidence needed to tackle the high level of difficulty that this test presents. The course will explore the test papers, examine in detail each task type, and gradually build up the skills, language and test techniques students need to approach IELTS with confidence.

GELS02. TOEFL Preparation

This course will help students to understand how to prepare for the test effectively and develop the English-language skills for academic and daily purposes; help students set weekly practice goals and stay on track with strategies and tips that can be used to increase TOEFL scores; improve students English language skills on reading, writing, listening and speaking; help students acquire more knowledge about American culture, history and other aspects. After taking courses, students would be able to: acknowledge the details and requirements of TOEFL iBT(internet-based test); be familiar with the format of TOEFL and bolster their language levels on four aspects(reading, writing, listening and speaking), measured by TOEFL; employ the tips and techniques during taking TOEFL and increase scores; enhance their English language levels and get prepared for future English tests and academic study; develop their vocabulary and strengthen their grammar; enrich their knowledge about American history, art, natural science and etc.


CLE008. Elementary Chinese I (2 credits)

This course provides language training of Mandarin Chinese to second/foreign language learners. The course starts from the Chinese phonetics: initials and finals, and then introduces initial-final combinations, tones and modulations. On the basis of the above field, radicals, characters, words and basic sentence patterns will be introduced. All the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing will be trained in the course. By the end of the course, students are expected to use learned Mandarin to solve daily problems in limited way.

CLE009. Elementary Chinese II (2 credits)

This course is a continuation of Elementary Chinese I. The course focuses on the use of more vocabularies and structures, especially the use of modal particles, location words, modal verbs and separable verbs. On sentence level: progression, manner, duration and completion of an act will be introduced and students are also expected to use learned functional words to express time, attitude, and expectation. By the end of the course, students should learn at least 700 Chinese words and develop an equivalent language ability of HSK-3.


CLE027. Intermediate Chinese I (2 credits)

This course provides language training of Mandarin Chinese to second/foreign language learners. The course aims to give comprehensive trainings of Mandarin Chinese with emphasis on oral and listening skills. The course content consists of a variety of patterns of daily expressions, especially on how to express frequency, emphasis, continuation and past experience. Comparative structures and passive sentences are the key parts to take efforts and the course will also introduce a few idioms and culture knowledge from the texts. By the end of the course, students are expected to apply learned materials and express themselves at paragraph levels.

CLE028. Intermediate Chinese II (2 credits)

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Chinese I. The course fosters students’ abilities to better use the learned vocabularies and grammars in real life setting. More efforts will be taken on oral tasks of using complement of potentiality, series of ba-sentence, as well as general, specific and fuzzy references. The course will also talk about some idioms and culture knowledge related to the content. By the end of the course, students should learn at least 1200 Chinese words and develop an equivalent language ability of HSK- 4.


CLE031. Advanced Chinese I (2 credits)

An advanced language course designed to improve and extend students’ language abilities and knowledge in Chinese. Most of the learning materials are narrative essays reflecting the contemporary society of China. Students will also learn functional expressions in context and participate in conversations and discussions of different topics. By the end of the course, students will be able to search information and use learned materials to give presentations on their interested topics.

CLE032. Advanced Chinese II (2 credits)

This course is a continuation of advanced Chinese I. The course summarizes how Chinese language organizes its phonetic elements, words, sentence patterns, paragraphs, and familiarizes students with different types of stories, essays and video resources reflecting contemporary society and cultural lives in China. Functional expressions and oral communications will be learned and practiced in context. And the aim of the course is to promote students to communicate their thoughts in correct and decent Chinese. By the end of the course, student should learn at least 2500 Chinese words and develop an equivalent language ability of HSK-5.


CLE021. SUSTech English I (4 credits)

SUSTech English I (SE I) is the first course in the Center for Language Education core curriculum. The course aims to improve the accuracy, fluency, and overall communicative competence of students for their university study. In this course, students are given plenty of opportunities and encouraged to practice their oral English and communicative skills both in and beyond the classroom. By engaging in meaningful discussions on various well-selected topics, students are able to gain confidence gradually as English speakers. Moreover, throughout the course, students are required to complete group projects, which motivate English utilization outside of classroom. Writing practice is another focus in this course. Following the steps of collaborative writing, independent writing, and reflective writing, with responsibilities added along the way, the course not only helps students to become better writers but also builds the character of an independent and responsible scholar-to-be.

CLE022. SUSTech English II (4 credits)

SUSTech English II (SE II) is the second course in the Center for Language Education core curriculum. It builds upon the skills introduced in SUSTech English I or further develops skills which students already have. The skills targeted in SUSTech English II will be needed in future courses. The course not only introduces the reading, writing, speaking and listening skills for fluent English communication, but also includes cross-cultural skills and language study skills to assist students to have a success in their learning of the content courses instructed in English language. It aims to help students construct their English language knowledge and skills under the guidance of their English teachers, and more importantly through their practice both in class and after class. By the end of the course, their English proficiency should be able to reach the upper intermediate level (CEFR B2/IELTS 5-6/TOEFL 87-100). The writing and presentation included in the assessment aim to develop students’ ability to analyze, criticize, and express ideas concisely in English. The course introduces the essay writing skills at the college level. Students are expected to demonstrate their ability to plan, organize and express ideas effectively and in grammatically correct sentences. In the process of preparing and practicing their presentation, student’s effective presentation skills will be developed and their cross-cultural competence can be boosted.


CLE023. SUSTech English III (4 credits)

SUSTech English III (SE III) is the third and advanced course of SUSTech English in the Center for Language Education’s core curriculum. Moving beyond the basic and intermediate skills, SUSTech English III pushes into advanced levels. It also aims to prepare students for the academic writing course, English for Academic Purposes. SUSTech English III further enhances learner’s ability to comprehend reading and listening materials through interactions with more complex and culturally diverse materials. Through individual presentations, students are introduced to concepts of researching, paraphrasing and citations. They present findings from literature exploration in an academic manner. Moreover, students engage in thought-provoking discussion on current topics, via which students acquire significant discussion skills and critical thinking capability. Writing assignments include more advanced essays. Informative writing and argumentative writing are incorporated in the course to reinforce students’ skills of writing a thesis statement and expressing one’s own voice in written language. The weighting of process in writing assignments and constructive feedback from both peers and instructors support the cultivation of intellectual character among students, paving their way to enter the academic community of practice.

CLE030. English for Academic Purposes (2 credits)

Lecture, 2 credits, 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: SUSTech English III.English for Academic Purposes (EAP) is the fourth and final course in the Center for Language Education (CLE) core curriculum.  It focuses on research writing and teaches students the skills necessary to use English effectively in a variety of academic contexts. Throughout the course, students are given ownership over their work, including being allowed to focus on topics which interest them, think critically, and develop their topics through research into a group presentation and individual argumentative research paper that meets academic standards. In addition to groupwork, peer editing also plays an important role, encouraging students to support each other, with the teacher acting as a guiding facilitator.Within the EAP framework, presentation and writing parameters are set, while at the same time, aiming to give students autonomy over their work, encouraging them through constructive feedback from both the teacher as well as their classmates. By completing the course, students are expected be aware of, and produce, work that conforms to academic norms. The course itself is demanding and acts as the benchmark for English-language instruction with the CLE at Southern University of Science and Technology.


CLE033. Chinese Culture (2 credits)

Lecture, 2 credits, 2 hours per week. Pre-requisites: N/A. This course systematically introduces Chinese philosophy and religions, literature, arts (including calligraphy), education, traditional festivals, cuisine and food culture, clothes, architecture, etc. It was designed to make the students understand Chinese culture in those aspects when they study Chinese language and subject knowledge here at SUSTech. Combining their own experience in China, the students will deepen their understanding of Chinese culture after taking this course. The course is mainly for international students.  

CLE034. Chinese History (2 credits)

Lecture, 2 credits, 2 hours per week. Pre-requisites:N/A. This course systematically introduces Chinese history which can be traced back to thousands of years ago. Following the chronological order of dynastical evolution, the course provides explanation and description of China’s development in politics, economy, society, culture, literature and arts, science and technology in different historical periods. It was designed to let the students have a comprehensive understanding of Chinese long history when they study Chinese language and subject knowledge here at SUSTech. It will also help the students better understand China’s current political systems, cultural and social customs as well as moral norms. The course is mainly for international students.


SUSTech Undergraduates Won the 3rd Prize at the 2018 Guangdong English Public Speaking Contest for College Students

On November 10, SUSTech undergraduates Xie Xinyan and Zheng Ruiqi took part in the Guangdong English Public Speaking Contest for College Students (The Semi-final of the 2018 “FLTRP﹒ETIC Cup” National English Speech Contest). After the fierce competition, Xie Xinyan won the Third Prize, which bettered SUSTech last year’s record. It is reported that this contest is the only English contest listed in the Project for cultivating innovative talents and assessing disciplinary competitions at Chinese Universities, of which the award-winning quota is limited. It is co-organized by Department of Education of Guangdong Province, Guangdong College English Teaching Advisory Board, and Guangdong Advisory Board on Teaching English Language to Majors in Higher Education. With the help of his coach Liu Lisha at Center for Language Education (CLE), as a science student, Xie Xinyan competed through impromptu speeches with 116 English-majored contestants from 54 Guangdong universities. Finally, his excellent speech won the Third Prize, which scored higher than those of 75 contestants. A couple of months ago, he already won the Second Prize in the Semi-final of the 2018 Shenzhen English Speech Competition. CLE fully supported their teacher and students’ participation in this contest and provided them with a precious opportunity to show their English and learn from each other.

Ethiopia and China: Educational Landscapes

  By: Matthew Jellick  Upon initial reflection, the similarities between Ethiopia and China may be few, distanced between contrasting continents, and spread across differing ideologies.  Yet as a teacher, something I have learned that brings the world closer together is education, and the understanding that achievement in the classroom often brings about success on a larger stage, regardless of location. This past week I had the opportunity to revisit Ethiopia, a country where I taught for two years prior to coming to China.  Engulfed in social, economic and educational change, Ethiopia, perhaps more than anywhere else I have lived, taught me more about myself both as a person and a professional, instilling in me ideals and beliefs which I have carried over to my instruction here in China.  During this recent trip, my eyes were once again opened to the importance of education in a cross-cultural context, and the role it plays in being an agent of change.   Classrooms in China come equipped with the latest technology, from Smart Boards to integrated online platforms.  In contrast, classrooms in Ethiopia sometimes lack basic necessities such as chalk or electricity.  Yet it is the ambition and determination of the students from each respective country which rise across physical and cultural divides; understanding that motivation comes from within, fueled by the dream of a better tomorrow where collaboration, not competition, drives global sustainability. During my week in the capital city of Addis Ababa, I led two English workshops, met with educational leaders, and even collaborated with scholarship recipients who have turned their dreams into reality.  One commonality they all shared was an interest in hearing about my experiences from China, a country which they see as an integral part of global growth.  For it is China where more and more students are turning to for educational and business opportunities, and they wanted to know more about things ranging from the university system to the high-speed trains.  I view myself not as an American teaching in China, but rather as a global educator, and I was happy to share stories with the Ethiopian students about the opportunities which exist not only in places like Shenzhen, but in fact anywhere they chose to set their ambitions towards.  Ethiopia, more than anywhere, is full of hope, and this communal strength is what continues to sustain their dreams.   To be able to work in these juxtaposed educational environments has underscored the notion that the world is our classroom, and that learning is indeed lifelong and worldwide.  I am grateful for these opportunities and hope that I can in turn share an extended worldview with my students on whichever continent I may be teaching. Matthew Jellick is a Senior Lecturer in the Center for Language Education at Southern University of Science and Technology.


SUSTech Student and Teacher Won Prizes in Two National English Competitions in Summer

The 2018 National English Competition for College Students (NECCS) Grand Final was held at Zhenjiang Yuexiu University of Foreign Languages on August 7. SUSTech undergraduate Zhao Yanchu took home the First Prize in English Debate Competition and the Second Prize in English Speech competition (Ranking 1st of all Guangdong contestants). Her instructor, Liu Lisha of SUSTech’s Center for Language Education, was awarded the Excellent Instructor Prize. She also won the First Prize in the Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press (FLTRP) Star Teacher Contest Semi-final which was held in Chengdu on August 1. The National English Competition for College Students (NECCS) is the only national college students’ English language competition jointly sponsored by the Ministry of Education’s Higher Education Department and the National Foreign Language Teaching and Research Association. It is held annually, composed of three parts: the Preliminary, the Final and the Grand Final. Zhao Yanchu, with proficient English, overcame several challenges throughout the contest to win the Supreme Prize at the Final and gain a ticket to the national Grand Final. With Liu Lisha’s help, she competed with other excellent contestants and finally stood out in the English debate and speech competitions.   Written by: Zhao Yanchu & Liu Lisha  

Staff English Coffee Socials: An Authentic Language Platform

By: Matthew Jellick One of the goals pertaining to my approach to teaching English is to provide as many authentic opportunities as possible to practice the language.  Traditional classroom lessons are fine, learning the fundamentals which underscore the importance of grammar, syntax and pronunciation, but for the communicative properties of English, it is important to provide everyday settings for students to utilize their knowledge.  To facilitate this, I have begun the Staff English Coffee Social, meeting once a month for not only language practice but to do so while enjoying delicious Ethiopian coffee.[vc_single_image image="829" img_size="large" alignment="center" style="vc_box_border"]Using the beautifully designed Social Science and Humanities Center on the 2nd flood of the SUSTech Library, I try to provide an arena where colleagues from different departments across the university can meet to network, share ideas, and get to know each other in an informal setting.  Lowering the affective filter is an easy tool to promote oral practice, and through our relaxed setting, ideas such as this are endorsed.  Staff English students from Physics, EEE, and the Library (to name only a few departments) all come for about an hour to meet and talk, perhaps sharing collaborative ideas or perhaps simply making new friends, both of which are underlying reasons why I thought this is a good idea.  Our Coffee Socials foster positive outreach from those who attend, aiming to build cross-departmental relationships for the betterment of the university at large..[vc_single_image image="830" img_size="large" alignment="center"]The lubricant of the discussions is delicious Ethiopian coffee, from the Oromia region, a remembrance of my past teaching experience on the Horn of Africa.  To able to share cultural ties which bind my current set of circumstances in China to those from my time in Ethiopia is something I am grateful for, and which highlights the worldview which has shaped my teaching experiences: Learning is Lifelong and Worldwide! All are welcomed to join the Staff English Coffee Socials, expending the growing network of English students at SUSTech, working together for our common goals…


Teachers from CLE attended the International Conference for English Language in the Chinese Context

The CLE was well represented the weekend of May 5th at the International Conference for English Language in the Chinese Context! Four teachers from the Center for Language Education were in attendance: Liu Qing, Olivia Bailey, Nicolas Rhea, and myself. All four CLE teachers were able to give presentations on their research as well. The conference was held in Hong Kong, by the Education University of Hong Kong at their beautiful mountain campus. The conference was a unique opportunity for us to exchange ideas with teachers from all over China, teaching English in various contexts from kindergarten to graduate programs. The four of us all felt that we learned a lot from our diverse colleagues at the conference. Nic felt that the conference “allowed [him] to engage with professionals for around China and learn new strategies and techniques to improve [his] teaching.” Many specific presentations inspired ideas we hope to incorporate into our teaching at SUSTech. An interesting presentation that Olivia and I attended discussed the specific pronunciation challenges faced by Chinese students and provided some activities and techniques to help with these challenges.  Olivia commented “I fully plan to apply this to my students” and she continued, “Pronunciation doesn’t have to be boring or a chore, it can and should be made fun and engaging for students!” Several presentations dealt with the ever increasing use of technology in the classroom. I attended a session that proposed the use of WeChat to facilitate in-depth discussions, while another presentation featured the APP Kahoot. In this presentation, Nic learned “how I can use mobile technology to help students with their vocabulary.” The conference new ideas presented at the conference reinvigorated our teaching at SUSTech. Equally exciting was the opportunity we had to share our own research with the other conference attendees. First up was Nic, with his presentation about his work with corpus and English for Specific Purposes. In it, he discussed how to use corpus to assess student need and then design an assignment using results from the move analysis (organization of written texts) found through the corpus. I found his research interesting and relevant. It was particularly wonderful to see his collaboration with the chemistry department here at SUSTech. In the afternoon, Liu Qing, Olivia Bailey, and I presented our research about using Portfolio Assessment for level one English students. After using portfolio assessment in our courses last semester, we went through the reflections of students to see what benefits this type of assessment had over traditional assessment (written examinations). We found that students felt more empowered in their writing, had more self-awareness about their strengths and weaknesses, and had a better understanding of the writing process. The reception for our presentation was great, and many people said they were thinking of trying portfolio assessment in their schools. As Liu Qing said, “I was so touched by my students’ feedback and comments and convinced that we did something meaningful and beneficial. More people need to know about it and use it in a wider context so more students could be empowered.” Overall, our attendance and participation in the conference was a wonderful experience. We were able to share our ideas as well as tap into wider knowledge about English teaching in the Chinese Context. An additional benefit was the opportunity for Nic and I to reunite with our former graduate professor and advisor, Randi Reppen, from Northern Arizona University. She was invited to the conference as the keynote speaker, and remarked that “Over 9 countries were represented and presentations ranged from practical classroom applications to research-based studies. Each of the concurrent sessions held so many interesting presentations, that choosing which one to attend was a dilemma.” We were lucky, then, that she attended both SUSTech presentations and provided meaningful feedback. The conference was an important opportunity for the CLE to impress the English teaching community in China, and I think we succeeded.   By: Natalie Ferguson

SUSTech Student Won the Supreme Prize Again in National English Competition for College Students

The 2018 National English Competition for College Students (NECCS) finals – China’s largest and most comprehensive English language contest – were held on May 20. It is the only national college students’ English language competition jointly sponsored by the Higher Education Department of the Ministry of Education and the Foreign Language Teaching and Research Association of the University. The Guangdong Final, divided into four student categories, took place at the Guangzhou University of Finance and Economics campus, with approximately 45 colleges and universities and a total of 289 students participating. SUSTech undergraduate Zhao Yanchu achieved 117.5 points (out of 150 points), an outstanding result and was awarded the Supreme Prize in the C category (non-English majors), ranking second out of 208. She is also qualified for the oral English contest final and will participate in it on June 3. (Student Zhao Yanchu and Instructor Liu Lisha) Within the last two years, SUSTech undergraduates not only have won the supreme prizes, but also topped the supreme prize candidates’ lists in this competition. Such excellent results reflect the quality of CLE small group classes’ teaching and one-to-one contest preparation tutoring.


Training on Presentation Skills

The HSBC Business Case Competition was established in 2008. It is an undergraduate competition focusing on case studies in the field of management. It is sponsored by the Hong Kong University Asia Case Study Center (ACRC) and was jointly funded by HSBC and McKinsey. In 2013, HSBC became the sole sponsor of the event. The competition is dedicated to providing high-standard international exchange platforms for undergraduate students in the Asia Pacific Business School. Adrian Xu from CLE, SUSTech was the presentation coach for the competition last year. He was invited again this year to provide presentation guidance directly for students from the Department of Finance who will participate in this competition in Guangzhou later this month. Having watched our demonstrations, he directed the four of us to improve one by one in terms of manuscript preparation, ways of delivering the speech, use of audiovisual aids, and points for attention in delivering the speech. Finally, Adrian suggested some practicing skills and tactics that could be used in the competition to build up our confidence. Thanks for his help, we finally reached the second round in the competition and achieved better results than the previous year.

SUSTech Staff English Book Club: Peter Hessler’s “River Town”

Peering through the morning haze which hovers like a blanket over Shenzhen, I walk through a campus overlooked by neighboring skyscrapers from across the street, seemingly created from scratch within the last week.   These buildings of gleaming glass house companies which are recognized across the world, not only creating products that will be used from Africa to America, but similarly, attracting talented employees from countries on nearly every continent.  Creation through innovation - this approach to business has helped China along the path to prosperity it currently finds itself on, utilizing a local as well as international workforce to create a positive economic and educational environment which tries to benefit everyone involved. On a daily basis at the university I teach at in Shenzhen, I hear the word “Internationalization” used with frequency, recognizing its importance, trying to emulate these successes in the classrooms which are being demonstrated in the boardrooms.  Foreign professors sharing their expertise with international students who likewise come equipped with different viewpoints are both an integral part of a constructive learning environment.  The world outside of campus is becoming less and less homogeneous, reflecting a changing business climate and it is prudent to prepare students for these realities.  Similarly, the approaches in deliverance of classroom information should also address the non-traditional methods of communication, shying away from conventional lectures and instead embracing cooperative learning models where students lead discussions; as involved in their learning outcomes as they would be in an innovative company which promotes cohesion, not separation. Geographically, Shenzhen has an innate advantage, as people from all corners of China come here in search of brighter futures, creating a multicultural city of sorts which boasts regional cuisine, distinct dress, and even local music from the varying provinces across the country.  These cultural complexities are what draws others – from outside of China – to Shenzhen, to teach, learn, and work, experiencing both professional and personal development with lessons taking place daily in their offices and on the streets.  These examples of difference should be fostered inside university campuses as well, promoting learning from a variety of backgrounds, exposing students to different ways of thinking while expanding their worldview. As an American with teaching experience on four different continents, I try to highlight not only Western methodology and pedagogy but furthermore, allow my students virtual access to the other places I have taught.  The internationalization of the classroom underlines the global environment we find ourselves in and likewise helps us to define the role we as individuals play.  Lessons which extend outside of campus, from participation in an American Book Club to a Webinar with African students helps to shape a different approach to common problems.  As a global citizen, I am grateful for my teaching and learning experiences here in Shenzhen, crouched underneath those clouds of haze yet knowing that the bridges built from here extend into that vast beyond where the possibilities are endless.


Student Debaters Won 2nd Prize in 21st “FLTRP Cup” National English Debating Competition South Regional

On March 25, the 21st FLTRP National English Debating Competition South Regional drew to a close. This is the second time that SUSTech participated in this competition. Our SUSTech team, Wang Jiuzhou and Zhao Yanchu, performed outstandingly and gained the Second Prize. Their coach Dr. Liu Lisha from CLE was given the Excellent Judge award. The “FLTRP Cup” National English Debating Competition, organized by the Central Committee of the Communist Youth League and All-China Students’ Federation, is well-known among all Chinese universities. There were 103 teams from 9 provinces’ universities and colleges registered for this competition. 16 teams were awarded second prizes.   Since 2017, CLE has selected students to participate in national oral English contests, aiming at motivating students to improve their critical thinking and overall quality through English learning. Meanwhile, the students regularly achieve excellent results, also reflecting the teaching quality of CLE’s oral English elective courses.   Center for Language Education

Student Won an Excellence Award at Canton Semi-final of 2017 “FLTRP Cup” National English Speech Contest

On October 29, Zheng Ruiqi took part in the Guangdong Semi-final of the 2017 “FLTRP Cup” National English Speech Contest held at Guangdong Polytechnic Normal University. It is the first time SUSTech has sent a student to participate in this event. Zheng Ruiqi has been enrolled in SUSTech for just over one month. With Center for Language Education (CLE) teacher Liu Lisha’s help, he overcame many difficulties such as time pressure for preparation and lack of competition experience. As the only freshman contestant, he competed thru impromptu speeches with 66 senior English-majored contestants from different universities in Guangdong. Although the competition was fierce, he calmly delivered his speech, which scored higher than those of over 20 contestants, and in the end, he won the Excellence Award. This contest not only provided a platform for undergraduates to showcase their English proficiency, communication skills and critical thinking, but also built a communicative platform for teachers and students from different universities. Stages such as these are a great opportunity for not only students, but teachers to also learn from each other. After the contest, Zheng Ruiqi said that this contest allowed him to practice his public speaking skills and broaden his horizons. He saw the gap between himself and the other, higher-placing contestants, and set a goal to make further efforts for his English-language skills.     (Written by Liu Lisha)


My International-Student Friends at SUSTech

At the beginning of the semester, CLE Teacher, Matthew Jellick encouraged his Sophomore A2 students to practice their writing skills, promising to help them get their articles printed in the local English newspaper, “The Shenzhen Daily”.  Maureen Liao, 廖琬凝, a student in his Tuesday/Thursday class, followed though, working with Matthew over the course of the first month to help her publish an article about her Cambodian classmate here at SUSTech. Titled, “My International Friend at SUSTech”, the article highlights the growing international student population and the cultural and academic diversity they add to our campus. My International-Student Friends at SUSTech By:廖琬凝(Maureen Liao) SUSTech Sophomore Student When I first came to SUSTech in 2016, the school started to receive foreign students around the same time. It was lucky for me to have the chance to live and study alongside people who came from an extremely different country and culture: Cambodia. The first time that I actually met them was at the Regional Culture Festival where students represented their hometowns and shared special regional cuisines with their peers. I just passed by and glanced at the international students’ booth where I saw a young man dressed in traditional Cambodian clothes and holding a wooden statue. It seemed that he was talking to the people who gathered together in front of the booth, so I walked towards it and found he was introducing the people to a statue that represents the religious figure Shiva. He spoke in English with a cute little accent, and I felt attracted to the mysterious and miraculous Indian Buddhist culture he spoke of. After a period of some time, the crowd of listening people gradually left and he finally noticed that I still stood there, appreciating the sculptures and the pictures of architecture printed on the postcards. He asked me if I needed an introduction to the building on the postcard he held. He told me that was Angkor Wat — but I was confused before he told me its Chinese name, “Wu Ge Ku,” — Cambodia’s most famous ancient architectural structure which also represents the beauty of the country. He also taught me some daily expressions in Cambodian. Before I left, we exchanged names. His name was Kevin, and he also told me his Cambodian name, Kosal Sout, although I can’t say it correctly because the Cambodian language has different pronunciations from Chinese. In 2017, SUSTech received more international students into the freshman class. These new students came from a variety of countries including Ukraine, Vietnam, Malaysia and Latvia. After they had been at the university for about one week, they took part in a meeting where the seniors — the 2016 Cambodian students — shared about their life and experiences living and learning in China. I really hope that Kevin and I will remain friends and that SUSTech will continue receiving international students who keep the campus colorful and rich with multiculturalism!

SUSTech Student Takes Summer Course at USC

  By: Matthew Jellick The notion of global education is spoken of often, with the understanding that we, as global citizens, are being brought closer together due to technological innovations and ideological practices, regardless of the distance which may stretch between respective countries.  No longer is China “on the other side of the world” from California, rather, it is an overnight-flight or a telephone call away, bridging that gap which explorers have fraught over for centuries.  Following, the benefits derived from this smaller collective of learners allows for the exchange of not only educational ideas but similarly, cultural practices. This Summer, one of my students at Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) in Shenzhen, took the opportunity to study at the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, enrolling in the 2017 Summer International Acting Institute Program, through USC’s School of Dramatic Arts.  Not necessarily a course which would be accessible in a traditional Chinese educational context, it was for this same reason that Krystal, a gifted student in her own right, chose to survey a trail which led off the prescribed path, following, what she described in her Personal Statement, as “the sum of craftsmanship, spirit, creative ideas, and inspiration.” I completed my Master’s Degree in Teaching at USC, and while home in California this Summer, I took time to visit campus, meeting up with Krystal to see her class while also touring the university.  Offering innovative practices to learn not only the specifics associated with Dramatic Arts but also the creative approaches to underlying theory, the four-week course steered away from rote learning and instead used exploration as a guide, encouraging students to “let go” and let inspiration lead the way.  Krystal mentioned that at first, this methodology surprised her, but after seeing the relationship between patience and practice, she realized that a redefinition of her approach was needed if she was truly to understand the varying identities which each of us have, and how we go about choosing which one we showcase to others both on and off the stage. A leader in STEM-related fields, SUSTech offers students an impressive education in those subjects, partnering with the entrepreneurial spirit which thrives in Shenzhen.  When coupled with ambitious students who wish to gain different perspectives from across the ocean, there is no limit to what cross-cultural and integrated educational partnerships can do, acting as a catalyst for cooperation and a mechanism for change.  For myself, to be able to bridge two universities which have played an integral part of own my educational journey, acts a testament to the power of global education, which stretches beyond distances and over time.   Matthew Jellick holds a Master’s Degree in Teaching from the University of Southern California and is currently a lecturer at Southern University of Science and Technology.  He has educational experience in ten different countries on five different continents.


TOEFL: Linguistic Gateway to the World

SUSTech’s Center for Language Education Lecturer, Matthew Jellick, recently had an article published in the “Shenzhen Daily”.  Below is his article for the “Shenzhen Daily” titled, “TOEFL: Linguistic Gateway to the World”. Original article: By: Matthew Jellick Last year at this time, I was teaching on behalf of the US Embassy’s “Opportunity Fund”, working with at-risk students in Ethiopia, helping them prepare for and apply to colleges and universities in the United States.  This included preparation for the SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test), Personal Statement essay writing, and of course, training for the TOEFL (Test Of English as a Foreign Language).  All three are necessary for admittance to American universities such as USC, Brown, or Cornell, securing these students a path out of East Africa and paving their future with an education which will in turn help them reach their dreams. This Summer I find myself once again teaching TOEFL, this time to Chinese university students, most of whom have a vastly different set of educational realities which face them, including postgraduate degrees abroad and applications to some of the world’s leading high-tech companies.  Yet it is the same amount of motivation which I have found in classrooms around the world – students understanding the importance of English and the role it plays in acting as a gateway to global ambitions.  The use of an adjective to describe a noun isn’t what will lead to aspired accomplishments, rather it is universal acceptance which comes with learning a second language and the social adaptation which underscores the importance of tests like TOEFL, measuring not only linguistic ability, but cultural understanding as well. Two hours a day over the course of four weeks I work with students at Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) on Speaking and Listening skillsets associated with the TOEFL test.  Contrast transition words providing clues to important shifts in the speaker’s content while intonation and variations in pitch highlight meaning and connotation.  The topics of our listening examples shed light on Americanisms, where distance is measured in miles and where weight is abbreviated as lbs.  The 30 students in our class laugh at the unfunny jokes, feign interest in the topics discussed, and gaze at words like vitriolic; the whole time understanding that this is a necessary means to an end.  Intensive linguistic learning takes place on a different set of gears than in a regular 16-week semester, but still, lessons are shared by all, with myself careful to facilitate learning, not to master. With previous experience teaching TOEFL courses in Ethiopia, and before that, Korea, I feel confident that my practice within a Chinese context has likewise gone smoothly, encouraging student learning through cooperation, giving them ownership over materials which at times may seem as foreign to them as the idioms often mentioned in our listening exercises.  As the teacher, I am able to learn too, gaining cultural insight from my students, much as was the case in Africa, as each set of students learns differently.  Grateful for these global opportunities, I hope that my instruction through TOEFL pedagogy will similarly give these students the same international prospects I have been afforded, expanding their worldview while opening providing a linguistic gateway to the world… Matthew Jellick holds a Master’s Degree in Teaching from the University of Southern California (USC) and has taught in five countries on four continents.  He is currently a lecturer at Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech).

Debating Team Won Outstanding Prizes in 20th “FLTRP Cup” National English Debating Competition (National Final)

  From May 18 to 25, 2017, the 20th “FLTRP Cup” National English Debating Competition was held in China Foreign Affairs University. Representing SUSTech, Wang Jiuzhou, a 2nd-year student and Xu Yizi, a 1st-year student won the third prize in the national final. Meanwhile, their tutor, Dr. Liu Lisha from the Center for Language Education, was selected for the 2nd Lesson Plan Presentation Competition and won the first prize. The “FLTRP Cup” National English Debating Competition was organized by the Central Committee of the Communist Youth League, All-China Students’ Federation and Beijing Foreign Studies University, and was hosted by the Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press (FLTRP). The 20th FLTRP Cup National English Debating Competition had 4 regional preliminary competitions (East China, West China, North China, and South China). 120 teams broke into the national final in 4 regional competitions. This is the first time for SUSTech debating team to participate in this competition. It not only broadens our students’ horizons, but also accumulates valuable experience for CLE English competition tutoring.    Written by Liu Lisha


SUSTech English Speaking Club Field Trip

By: Matthew JellickFor the past two Semesters, I have led the Southern University of Science and Technology’s Speaking Club, “Voice of SUSTech” through weekly meetings, assembling every Sunday night to practice conversational English in an informal environment.  These gatherings – not classes – act as a practical platform for English language acquisition in an authentic setting, where rankings, competitions and tests are not part of the curriculum.In an effort to underscore the notion of genuine learning opportunities I helped the students plan a field trip outside of campus, where they could practice their English conversational skills in a setting which pushed the boundaries of their comfort zone.  Within language attainment, it is challenges which foster growth, whereas rote learning only promotes an adherence to bygone practices.  Wishing to promote lessons that the students could utilize outside the classroom, we organized a “Foreigner Interview Project” at Shekou, an area with many international restaurants and shops, so that the students would have ample opportunities to speak and interact with people from across the globe.Gathering at Noon in a Mexican restaurant, there were about 20 students, in addition to five staff, each of whom joined for this unique educational experience. Language is a part of culture, and even the introduction to Spanish language and Mexican food sparked curiosity, as during our lunch, Sophomore student Liu Changgao found an immediate interest, sitting down to interview the owner of the restaurant, creating an instantaneous cultural exchange between the two, bridging any division of separation through simple conversation, with English acting as the common language. Ideas and practices such as these were the goal of this project, and a Chinese student speaking with a Mexican business owner is a testament to this notion, and an example of the power of comfortability with language in an everyday setting.Over the course of nearly two hours on a Sunday afternoon, the students and staff from the Speaking Club were able to interview people from across the globe, including Russia, France, Greece, the United States, and numerous other countries. Asking a series of about five questions to the respective interviewees, the SUSTech students reported back with positive results, meeting people such as a Ukrainian filmmaker, a Uruguayan professor, and a Dutch researcher. In many cases, the “interviews” turned into conversations, with dialogue flowing in each direction, adding deeper substance to the prescribed questions.Part of my role as a foreign teacher within a Chinese educational context is not merely to espouse the importance of second language learning, but to similarly share the cultural aspects which encompass language. Through activities such as this field trip, students and staff alike learned not only communicative skillsets associated with conversation, but moreover through the dialogues, they learned about cultural aspects associated with South American and European countries and the complexities which affect their realities living and working in China. Not only were the student’s language skills enhanced through the “Foreigner Interview Project” but more importantly, their worldviews were expanded as well.

Our Student Won the Special Prize of the 2017 National English Competition for College Students (Final)

On the 14 of May, the 2017 National English Competition for College Students (Final) was successfully held at Guangdong University of Finance & Economics. 40 universities in Guangdong Province took part in this competition. This is the first time for SUSTech to participate in it. Qiu Chengjie, a 2nd-year student, won the Special Prize (the highest prize) of the Category C (for non-English major students) and his score ranked the second of the 197 participants in this category. The instructor, Dr. Liu Lisha, from CLE was invited for paper grading by the competition organizing committee.   Approved by the Higher Education Department of the Ministry of Education, the National English Competition for College Students (NECCS) is jointly sponsored by the Advisory Board for College Foreign Language Teaching under the Ministry of Education and College English Teaching & Research Association of China. Being the only comprehensive English ability competition for college students in China, NECCS is the one of the most important indicators of the English teaching level at colleges. (Written by LIU Lisha)


Author Interview: Peter Hessler

By: Matthew Jellick Throughout this Semester, members of the SUSTech English Book Club have been reading the nonfiction account of Peter Hessler’s, River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze. Within the pages, the Staff who make up the Book Club are able to delve into the experiences the author had 20 years ago when he was living and teaching in rural China, mirroring many of the same complexities faced now, even as the country has developed over the past two decades. Meeting every two weeks, we gather to discuss how the words pertain to both our individual as well as collective experiences, challenging preconceived ideas while underscoring the importance of culture in an educational context. Thinking of ambitious ways to capitalize on this experience, I reached out to Mr. Hessler to see if he would be interested in speaking with our group about his book. To our amazement, he responded with delight, and last Wednesday we had the opportunity to conduct a Skype Interview with him from his home in Colorado. Each of the students came prepared with a question to ask, ranging from topics found within the book to broader issues pertaining to China as a whole. Mr. Hessler was both personable and professional, and our hour-long conversation will be something I will reflect upon with a smile on my face, years from now when I am in a different country, teaching different students. Peter Hessler is currently a writer for The New Yorker, and his book we are reading, River Town, is the first of three he has written about life in China. Recently returning from five years living and writing in Cairo, Egypt, he seemed to have no problems recounting his experiences from Fuling, and the small college he taught at as a Peace Corps. Volunteer in 1996. Throughout our interview, he was patient, answering each question with the respect and validity the students put into creating them. Book Club member Deng Dandan, from the Electrical and Electronic Engineering Department, asked: “Within the book, it seemed like you had had two lives in Fuling, one as Peter and another as “He Wei”. But after the two years in Fuling, what happened to “He Wei”? Did those experiences strengthen your ability, while expanding your life and your mind? Do you think two years in China paid off in those respects?” Using the interactive videoconferencing tool of Skype before switching over to a telephone, each of the 15 members of the Book Club took turns speaking with Mr. Hessler, and each time, new insights into his writing were raised. Monica Huang, a Librarian at SUSTech and founding member of the Book Club sums it up nicely: “This Book Club is beyond what I could have expected. I believe the author interview was not only an interesting outreach, but it also really made a big difference. The communication with Peter Hessler gave me a total different perspective when I read River Town, and I am grateful for the opportunity.”

SUSTech Student Debaters Shone in the 20th FLTRP National English Debating Competition South Regional

On the 9th April, the 20th FLTRP National English Debating Competition South Regional drew to a close. This is the first time that SUSTech participated in this competition and our debaters performed outstandingly. Our SUSTech team, Wang Jiuzhou and Xu Yizi, led by Dr. Liu Lisha from CLE ranked 24 among the 111 teams and gained the Second Prize. There are in total five rounds. Debaters only have 20 minutes to prepare without any researches after the motion is released. These five motions are set in different fields which require the competitors to have a wide range of knowledge. Debating is really different from public speaking. It not only requires you an advanced English level, but also a clear logic and the ability to analyze various issues. Finally, we sincerely congratulate teacher-coach Liu Lisha and the debaters Wang Jiuzhou and Xu Yizi. In addition, we hope that more and more students at SUSTech can actively participate in this debating competition in order to challenge and improve themselves. (Written by Xu Yizi, Liu Lisha)


SUSTech English Book Club: Discussing Different Viewpoints

By: Matthew Jellick This Spring Semester the Staff English Class began a Book Club, reading Peter Hessler’s “River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze”. Meeting every other Thursday during lunch, our group consists of SUSTech Staff members who enjoy English literature, and who value the notion of constructive dialogue as it applies to both cultural and educational frameworks. The Book Club consists of 17 students as well as myself, acting as a facilitator, reading three chapters (about 100 pages) every two weeks, coming prepared with issues which we both agree and disagree with, along with questions and concerns about the writing. As active and engaged readers, the Staff Students take notes during their readings, highlighting and underlining important passages which speak to their own experiences.  Challenging ideas while understanding context allows for the discussion of different viewpoints, learning that when combined, our individual realities form a cohesive bond. River Town follows the path of Peter Hessler from 1996-1998 while he was a Peace Corps. Volunteer at Fuling Teachers College in Sichuan Province. Much like my own current set of circumstances in 2017 Shenzhen, he taught English and culture in a university setting, writing about many of the challenges and opportunities which I too encounter on a daily basis. For our Staff English Class, this seemed like an ideal book to study, as even though it describes events from 20 years ago, in a number of respects, it mirrors the complexities which both myself as well as my students face in modern day China. Development may improve infrastructure and access to foreign capital but cultures change less rapidly, providing learning opportunities to explore our differences in opinions. Whether along the Yangtze River or the South China Sea, there is no right answer, rather a combination of ideas which encourage discussion and ultimately lead to compromise. Literature reflecting life! To underscore our understanding of the book, I reached out to the author to see if he would be interested in speaking with us directly about his experiences in China, discussing with our Book Club via videoconference. Peter Hessler still writes, most notably for The New Yorker, and his articles continue to delve past the surface limitations of image and into the greater depth of substance. To our delight, he agreed to set up a time to talk with us, allowing a refined definition of the words we are reading, told by the author some 20 years later. It is these expanded opportunities for learning – stretching beyond language into culture – which emphasizes the true nature of global education. The SUSTech English Book Club is another example of the creative ideas for learning which are being fostered by those who understand the value of authentic educational models. Twenty years ago, students in Fuling learned new ways of approaching common ideas by being introduced to an American teacher who brought with him a different perspective. Today, as I work with motived staff students in Shenzhen, I too am looking for innovative approaches to teaching about English and culture as well. Reading River Town in our Book Club provides us with such an opportunity, where we reach beyond the traditional classroom, beyond our own circumstances, and beyond time and place, only to arrive at a new understanding painted by differing viewpoints which allows reflection as we continue to move downstream.   Matthew Jellick holds a Master’s Degree in Teaching from the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, and is currently a lecturer at Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) in Shenzhen.  

Global Education: Differing Ideas to Common Dreams

SUSTech’s Center for Language Education Lecturer, Matthew Jellick, recently had an article published in the “Shenzhen Daily”, writing about the importance of a global approach to education. With educational experience himself on five different continents, Jellick believes that an international context provides students – regardless of location – with an expanded worldview which they can utilize both inside and outside the classroom. While teaching abroad, Matthew has written similar educational pieces for the “Korean Times” and “Ethiopian Herald”, aiming to articulate the climate of learning in those respective countries. Below is his article for the “Shenzhen Daily” titled,”Global Education: Differing Ideas to Common Dreams” Original article: By: Matthew Jellick Peering through the morning haze which hovers like a blanket over Shenzhen, I walk through a campus overlooked by neighboring skyscrapers from across the street, seemingly created from scratch within the last week. These buildings of gleaming glass house companies which are recognized across the world, not only creating products that will be used from Africa to America, but similarly, attracting talented employees from countries on nearly every continent. Creation through innovation – this approach to business has helped China along the path to prosperity it currently finds itself on, utilizing a local as well as international workforce to create a positive economic and educational environment which tries to benefit everyone involved. On a daily basis at the university I teach at in Shenzhen, I hear the word “Internationalization” used with frequency, recognizing its importance, trying to emulate these successes in the classrooms which are being demonstrated in the boardrooms. Foreign professors sharing their expertise with international students who likewise come equipped with different viewpoints are both an integral part of a constructive learning environment. The world outside of campus is becoming less and less homogeneous, reflecting a changing business climate and it is prudent to prepare students for these realities. Similarly, the approaches in deliverance of classroom information should also address the non-traditional methods of communication, shying away from conventional lectures and instead embracing cooperative learning models where students lead discussions; as involved in their learning outcomes as they would be in an innovative company which promotes cohesion, not separation. Geographically, Shenzhen has an innate advantage, as people from all corners of China come here in search of brighter futures, creating a multicultural city of sorts which boasts regional cuisine, distinct dress, and even local music from the varying provinces across the country. These cultural complexities are what draws others – from outside of China – to Shenzhen, to teach, learn, and work, experiencing both professional and personal development with lessons taking place daily in their offices and on the streets. These examples of difference should be fostered inside university campuses as well, promoting learning from a variety of backgrounds, exposing students to different ways of thinking while expanding their worldview. As an American with teaching experience on four different continents, I try to highlight not only Western methodology and pedagogy but furthermore, allow my students virtual access to the other places I have taught. The internationalization of the classroom underlines the global environment we find ourselves in and likewise helps us to define the role we as individuals play. Lessons which extend outside of campus, from participation in an American Book Club to a Webinar with African students helps to shape a different approach to common problems. As a global citizen, I am grateful for my teaching and learning experiences here in Shenzhen, crouched underneath those clouds of haze yet knowing that the bridges built from here extend into that vast beyond where the possibilities are endless. Matthew Jellick holds a Master’s Degree in Teaching from the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, and is currently a lecturer at Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) in Shenzhen.   http://www.szdaily.com/content/2017-03/29/content_15777803.htm


A Worthwhile Academic Visit by Prof. Mike Igoe from SUNY

Professor Mike Igoe from the State University of New York at Fredonia visited SUSTech from March 11th to March 17th. He conducted a series of nine seminars on public speaking and presentation skills, learning English, understanding American society, writing right, media ethics, etc. Over the years, Professor Mike won a lot of awards in public speaking and he was a television consumer reporter for over 30 years before he switched to teaching in Universities. Recently he won an award from the Broadcast Education Association for the Best Instructional Video on Good Storytelling. On March 10th when Professor Mike arrived at SUSTech, he attended the third meeting of the Voice of SUSTech, a public speaking club supervised by Dr. Zhuo Li and Matthew Jellick. There he demonstrated effective and lively public speaking skills, observed and gave constructive feedback on students presentations. He received very positive responses from students and the gathering was fruitful and fun. During the week of his visit, he was also invited by Dr. Zhuo Li and Dr. Elaine Ng to their public speaking and English classes to meet their students and shared with them public speaking and learning English skills. He answered students’ questions about public speaking, English learning, and American culture.  “Professor Igoe is the right person,” Dr. Li said. “He’s a seasoned public speaker, publishing about and teaching public speaking. His rich experience and practical suggestions are great treasure to my students.” Possessing charisma, a sociable personality and a great sense of humor, Professor Mike was well-liked by our students. Obviously students were engaged and inspired creatively by his talks and sharing of his experiences as a TV consumer reporter before he taught in academia. He was asked a lot of sensible questions related to his presentation topic after every seminar. The two most popularly received workshops are the ones on “English colloquialism” and “Learning conversation English.” Students generally found the talks substantial, interesting, and inspiring. The seminars provoked their interest to learn daily life English in a lively and fun way. The following are snapshots of students’ brief comments on the workshops: “I think the workshop was perfect because it taught us various practical words. The part I liked most was the interaction with native speakers.” “It’s great, the part about bargaining. I was interested in the process.” “Because of cultural differences, we are not native speakers. It’s important to know some colloquial English that can help us learn more about a country.” “It’s interesting and useful. Two parts both caught my attention: the first part let me know new things and the second one taught me how to learn English better.” “I think Prof. Mike was outstanding, he spoke fluently and loudly, which was impressive.” “It’s great. The teacher was very funny. The colloquialism caught my attention because I learned many expressions that I have never heard of.” Professor Mike’s visit benefited both our students and staff. We look forward to similar events organized by the CLE in future. This kind of function is a very meaningful activity conducted to help students enhance their interest, widen their scope, and motivate them to learn English outside conventional classroom setting through social interaction and exposure to a native-speaking environment.   By Elaine

Foreigner Interview Project

By: Matthew Jellick In an effort to get outside our comfort zone of speaking English only in a classroom setting, I came up with an assignment to challenge the Staff to incorporate their speaking skills in a more authentic environment.  Developing a five-point plan during class last week, I asked them to conduct a “Foreigner Interview” outside of campus, drawing on individually designed questions which incorporated both factual (Where are you from?) as well as opinionated (What do you like most about Chinese culture?) questions.  This week during class, those who completed the assignment gave presentations about their interviews, sharing not only about the experience of speaking with foreigners, but in turn, what the conversation itself entailed. Over the course of the past week, the SUSTech Staff met outside of campus with English, Canadian, American, Russian, Pakistani and even Iranian people who live and work in Shenzhen, asking them a series of five questions.  Reporting back during this week’s class, they seemed excited at the notion, stating that while at first they were nervous approaching foreigners, it didn’t take long for the “interview” to become more of a “conversation”.  They explained that in a Chinese sociocultural context, it is often intimidating to approach foreigners to ask questions, but quickly realized that these people had interesting stories to tell, and were honest in their answers and genuine in their approach. Part of the assignment also included them taking a photo with their interviewee, which in turn led to stories of their own.  The SUSTech Staff found their interview opportunities in various “foreigner hotspots” around town including Carrefour (the French supermarket), Starbucks (at the second one visited) and at University Town (which hosts a number of international PostDoc. programs).  Through faces of accomplishment you can see the adulation in their smiles knowing that they not only completed the assignment, but more importantly gained confidence in their English skillsets, obtaining a comfort level in speaking with foreigners in an authentic setting. With a goal to continue to find learning opportunities which extend beyond the confines of the classroom, I will continue to promote activities which challenge the staff and hopefully teach them through interactive pedagogy that authentic learning takes place in a setting which oftentimes makes them uncomfortable.  Similarly, I believe that projects such as this also underline the idea that language is a part of culture which can be understood through interactions that not only increase attainment but expand worldviews.


Prize Essay Competition for CLE Student Newsletter

The Essay Topic Learning with CLE at SUSTech has helped me to become a better English user   Essays can be any length up to a maximum of 3,000 words and should aim to bring fresh insight and understanding to English learning.   Content and style Essays should be jargon free, making points as concretely and clearly as possible. The judges are looking for strong, well-argued cases with positive ideas. The winning essays will be published on the 1st issue of CLE Student Newsletter, a quarterly magazine dedicated to improving SUSTech students’ English writing.   Timetable The closing date for entries is 30 April 2017. Prize winners will be announced during May 2017.   The judges CLE English Language Teachers   Prizes The winners will receive prizes from CLE.   Submission Essays should be submitted to liuls@sustc.edu.cn by midnight 30 April 2017.

Chinese Language Training for International Staff/Faculty

Offering a course for Staff and Faculty at SUSTech, we touch upon the four skillsets associated with Chinese (Mandarin) attainment including Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening. There is a particular focus on the spoken language and basic survival skills. This class is designed for engaging and interactive activities which promote language development, fostering practical applications of Chinese both inside as well as outside the classroom. Language itself is just one part of the larger realm of culture and through our weekly lessons we address how Chinese (Mandarin) can be used as a tool for continued success for the Staff and Faculty at SUSTech.


Global Educational Sharing: Southern University of Science and Technology & The University of Southern California

By: Matthew Jellick During the Spring Festival Holiday, I spent some time in California seeing friends and family and of course enjoying the warm sunshine and ocean breeze. While home, I visited the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles, where I received my Master’s Degree in Teaching, and with which I still carry both a personal and professional relationship. Since graduating in 2012, I have volunteered on behalf of the Rossier School of Education at USC, working with prospective students interested in the program, and following, writing articles about my overseas teaching experiences afforded me through my Graduate Degree. In California during the Spring Festival, I was invited to a Chinese New Year Celebration hosted by the TESOL Department at USC. Most students in attendance were from Mainland China, completing their two-year M.A. in Teaching on campus in Los Angeles, with aspirations to return home to work in this dynamic and demanding educational environment. From my perspective as an American educator teaching in China, it was an exciting opportunity to share ideas, learning about their experiences as Chinese students studying in the States, culminating in employment back here on the mainland. An interesting study in cross-cultural education, it is a testament to the global reach of English-language teaching and the empowerment it provides both teachers and students alike. Over the course of my time here at Southern University of Science and Technology, I aim to establish collaboration with the University of Southern California. It was an honor to meet such motived Chinese students getting their Masters Degrees through USC and in turn, to share with them the incredible work we are doing here at SUSTech. Working in partnership with the Center for Language Education (SUSTech) and the Rossier School of Education (USC), we have the opportunity to further advance the linkage between the respective countries of China and the United States, where common educational goals trump geographical divides, and where English-language learning helps to bridge that gap across the Pacific.

Welcome Back to School!

The CLE welcomes back all students after the lunar New Year celebration and wishes you a wonderful Spring semester!  


Voice of SUSTech Speaking Club

By: Matthew Jellick Over the course of my first Semester here at South University of Science and Technology, I had the opportunity to get involved with the English-Speaking Club, “Voice of SUSTech”.  Led by a team of motivated students, we met every Sunday night for two hours, working on skillsets pertaining to Public Speaking, including individual as well as group presentations, formatted through a variety of different techniques.  With participation ranging anywhere from five to 15 students, similarly, the level of speakers varies as well, but with encouragement coming from everyone, finding unity in their desire to improve their English-speaking skills. The ability to communicate underlines the practical use of a language, trumping the assessment that so many of these students carry as a weight throughout their educational careers.  To be able to practice the communicative tool of speaking in a low-impact environment only goes to promote sustainable learning practices, as we work on projects with creative involvement from everyone.  Role-playing dialogues, impromptu speeches, and word games all go to increase verbal prowess when speaking to a large group while also offering alternatives to traditional teaching models. As an instructor, I am grateful to see these students taking the initiative to create this group on their own, using me simply as a facilitator – helping to shed light, not to master.  They are truly a remarkable group of students who through practices such as these, hone their English speaking skills, but perhaps more importantly, increase their leadership skills as well. VOS speech practice, photo by Matthew Jellick Club pizza party, photo by Matthew Jellick  

Children of SUSTech: English Growth

By: Matthew Jellick Throughout this first Semester teaching the Staff at South University of Science and Technology, it is evident the important role which English has on my students’ endeavors, both personally and professionally. Yet while each of them plays an integral part in the path this university is taking, it is their children, many of whom are in Elementary School, who will continue to pave the way forward, inside as well as outside of the classroom.     To assist with English-language attainment, I volunteered to teach once-a-week classes to SUSTech Staff children, ranging in ages from 5 to eleven.  Learning incorporated through games and activities enables them to practice their skillsets with a native speaker, while also experiencing the differences in educational culture, an important understanding of becoming a global citizen. Classes are free, lasting one hour, and are meant to promote English learning through fun and interactive lessons, not as a resource for tests or advancement.  It is my belief that through initiatives such as this, we can further promote the mission of SUSTech, and following, to aid in the development of young learners as they pave the road ahead towards an integrated global community where language is not a barrier.    


Workshop: Practical English in an Everyday Setting

  By: Matthew Jellick Within the Center for Language Education at SUSTech, we prepare students on the various skillsets which make up a solid foundation in English attainment, improving their communicative abilities that will propel them even after they leave our classrooms.  Yet it is the world outside of those same classrooms where everyday life takes place, offering countless examples and opportunities for students to practice and utilize their English proficiency. My Workshop highlighted the “Practical use of English in an Everyday Setting”, taking examples from both on-campus as well as the larger realm of Shenzhen.  From the metro to banking, China is making strident efforts to incorporate English into their businesses and culture, understanding the importance of this global language.  Language learners then should take advantage of this shift, challenging themselves to opt for the “English” menu where available. Held on a Tuesday morning and Friday afternoon, there were a total of about 40 participants at the workshops, including both students and staff, learning about how they can use their second-language skills outside of the classroom.  I was able to cite examples I use as a foreigner living in Shenzhen, and in turn, encouraged others to use those same opportunities as a learning tool, outside in their everyday surroundings. I was encouraged by the feedback I got from those who participated, and am looking forward to continuing to promote practical English usage.  Following, next Semester I will aim to also use this underlying theme in my next workshop, highlighting each of our roles in this global community where languages shouldn’t be a barrier.

The Preliminary Campus-wide Contest at SUSTech for the 20th “FLTRP Cup” National English Debating Competition was Successfully Held by CLE

On the 15th December 2016, the SUSTech preliminary campus-wide contest for the 20th “FLTRP Cup” National English Debating Competition was successfully held at CLE common area. Twenty-two teams of students from different departments registered for this contest. After rigorous selection by CLE teachers, four teams moved on to this competition. Finally, the team of Wang Shuyu and Liu Xinyue offered a remarkable performance and won the First Prize of this contest. Xu Yizi, standing out among the other seven debaters competing, earned the award for single best debater. The “FLTRP Cup” National English Debating Competition inaugurated in 1997 is the most prestigious National English Debating Event in China. The 20th National English Debating Competition is organized by the Youth League, All Students Union and Beijing Foreign Studies University, and jointly hosted by the Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press.   Written by Lisha Liu Photos by Lisha Liu  


SUSTech Language Training for Staff: Expanding Cooperation Through English Learning

As the world continues to shift towards a smaller global community, shedding the distance between countries and continents, English language learning remains as pertinent as ever, helping to bridge the divide that separates. Common goals inspire common avenues, and Southern University of Science and Technology is paving the path towards internationalization within itself to help foster a community of learners, researchers, and staff that works together, underlying the foundations of cooperative education.   Introduced this year, English Language Training for Staff, facilitated by Matthew Jellick, is a course which brings together members of different departments for daily lessons on the both the fundamentals of English as well as many of the cultural aspects which encompass language. Learning important vocabulary as well as critical thinking skills, SUSTech Staff are encouraged to think outside the classroom, applying their knowledge to practical situations which they encounter on a daily basis. Using language acquisition as motivation for social mobility, students from the Library, Human Resources, Student Affairs and a number of other offices are taking advantage of this course which promotes cooperation amongst the different departments, in turn supporting collaboration with various partners and new colleagues. The city of Shenzhen is a microcosm of the diversity which now defines our international context, with people from all corners of China here to advance themselves through personal and professional development. A leader in creativity, technology and the entrepreneurial leadership which merge the two, the same attributes which describe our city can be applied to Southern University of Science and Technology, and the talented people involved with its development towards a global leader in education. As SUSTech moves towards its goal of becoming a top-tier international university, the Staff Language Training acts as a strong example of fulfilling a promise which the university is making to itself to ensure an expanded global understanding on behalf of everyone involved here on campus in Shenzhen, as we reach out to an expanded global platform.   Written by Matthew Photos by Matthew

SUSTech Delegation of CLE Pays a Return Visit to SZU

On the morning of November 25, 2016, Dr. Kathy O’Sullivan, Director of the Centre of Language Education (CLE), SUSTech, led a delegation to pay a return visit to the Department of College English (DCE), College of Foreign Languages, Shenzhen University (SZU). She was accompanied by Drs. Xu Siqun, Hu Yuxiu, Zhang Xinting, and Zhang Yuanyuan, teachers in  the CLE. Dr. Zhang Xinying, Vice Dean of DCE, received the SUSTech delegation on behalf of SZU, and extended a warm welcome. Zhang Xinying firstly introduced the background of DCE, where students are placed into English class according to their level. The first-year students are divided into 3 levels of English classes according to their English proficiency, among which, 25 A-level classes have adopted a flipped classroom model. They also make full use of MOOC, the online learning platform. B-level classes follow a traditional College English teaching and learning model, while C-level targets students majoring in Arts and Physical Education. Following the introduction, Zhang Xinying led SUSTech teachers to observe A-level and B-level English classes, with everyone observing different classes. Dr. Kathy O’Sullivan observing an A-level English class Afterwards, Zhang Xinying guided SUSTech teachers to the Computer Lab, where SZU students can make use of online resources and other supplementary materials to study listening and speaking. The labs are popular for self-access study. The autonomous learning process is monitored by teaching assistants and the students’ performance will be counted as 20 per cent of their final evaluation. The four Computer Labs, which can seat 100 students each, are open to the students for the whole day and promote autonomous development. SUSTech delegation visiting a Computer Lab at SZU Following the visit to the Computer Labs, teachers from both universities had a brief discussion at the lakeside. They exchanged their opinions about streaming students according to level, flipped classroom models and evaluation of and by students. Discussion at the lakeside Subsequently, both parties conducted an in-depth discussion on specific cooperation in such areas as curriculum design, professional development, and reform in English teaching. During the discussion, Dr. Hu Yijie, Dean of DCE, introduced their experimental teaching reforms and the challenges they face at present. He attached great importance to establishing and maintaining a good relationship with the CLE, SUSTech, and hoped to explore and build a strong partnership with it in the near future. Dr. Kathy O’Sullivan expressed her appreciation for the warm welcome received from DCE and shared the recent pioneering changes at CLE, SUSTech. She also expressed the wish to further enhance professional exchanges and establish partnerships of mutual benefit. Both sides were taking a group photo in the conference room at the Department of College English Later, both parties mutually presented each other with cultural souvenirs of their respective universities. The visit has now established the foundation for further cooperation in Spring 2017.   Written by: Yuanyuan Zhang Photos by: Siqun Xu  


Personal Statement Workshop

In November, two workshops on personal statement writing wereconducted by Chu Yu from the CLE. Students from different departments attended the workshops. This workshop’s aim is to prepare students  who plan to pursue their postgraduate studies overseas with essential writing techniques to tackle their personal statements. Personal statements provide the best opportunity for students to show why they are interested in studying at a particular university. It is a chance for students to gain admission to their dream universities. The workshop started with a discussion on what the personal statement is and why it is important. Then, topics of how to prepare a personal statement, what to include in a personal statement, how to write it and some technical details were covered. Samples of good and not-so-good personal statements were presented to students so that they could have a clearer idea about what they need to emulate, and, just as importantly, what should be avoided in their personal statements.  

Guest Talk about Public Speaking by Mr. Talis Wong, a Distinguished Toastmaster

On November 17th, Mr. Talis Wong, a guest speaker of CLE’s elective course “Fundamentals of Public Speaking” was invited to give a lecture titled “How to Convey Messages Effectively in Public Speaking” in Rm 110, SUSTech library. In introducing Mr. Wang, Dr. Kathy O’Sullivan mentioned that he was once an engineer but currently worked as a professional trainer, which immediately grabbed SUSTech’s attention and interest. Mr. Talis Wong talks about practical skills used in public speaking.Mr. Wong is a Global NLP (Neuro-Linguistics Programming) Trainer and a Distinguished Toastmaster (Toastmasters International is an organization in communication and leadership training). He was the District Trainer of Toastmasters International, and ex-adviser of Education and Training of China Toastmasters (2002-2014). Being a professional trainer, Mr. Wong conducts training for corporate executives, and executives and staff members in universities, professional institutes, and organizations. Over the past 10 years, he has also been coach and trainer in public speaking and presentation for secondary school and university students.Mr. Wong started the talk by sharing some interesting pictures taken in daily life to explain the core of neuro-linguistic programming is finding the small differences that make the big differences. The small differences that can effectively improve public speaking, according to Mr. Wong, in public speaking included eye contact, WIIFM (what’s in it for me), 3D delivery, pauses, less is more, and magical touch. He emphasized that fierceness, tenderness, and playfulness could make a speech meaningful, touching, and entertaining. Being replete with real life stories, examples, acting out, and humor, Mr. Wong’s lecture elicited laughter and applause from time to time. The talk per se presented a good example of public speaking to the audience.During the Q&A session, the audience asked varied questions with great enthusiasm. Students sought further suggestions for dealing with silence, eye contact, and academic presentations. Mr. Siqun Xu, a CLE instructor, wondered how to instruct students to use story telling in their presentations. Tianyuan Wang asks a question about eye contact in public speaking.At the end, Jiuzhou Wong, a student taking “Fundamentals of Public Speaking” made an announcement about “Voice of SUSTech,” a new student club set up to improve SUSTech students’ public speaking skills with the help of Dr. Zhuo Li and the sponsorship of CLE. Jiuzhou, the organizer of the student club, invited all the audience to join the club to horn their public speaking skills. Jiuzhou Wang invites the audience to join Voice of SUSTech.Dr. Li, the instructor of “Fundamentals of Public Speaking” said that Mr. Wong’s talk was a great addition to the course and Voice of SUSTech would help extend public speaking practice beyond classroom teaching and learning.Reported by CLEWritten by: Zhuo LiPhotos by: Zhuo Li


English-Language Training for Staff

Offering a course for Staff at SUSTech, we touch upon the four skillsets associated with English attainment including Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening. With sections for Elementary, Pre-Intermediate and Intermediate levels, this class is designed for engaging and interactive activities which promote language development, fostering practical applications of English both inside as well as outside the classroom. Language itself is just one part of the larger realm of culture and through our weekly lessons we address the changing complexities happing on a global platform, and how English can be used as a tool for continued success for the Staff at SUSTech.  

Daily Tasks in CLE as Student Assistants

  Hello everyone, we are CLE student assistants, Bruce Shaun and Sherry Zhang. Have you ever wondered what exactly we are doing as CLE student assistants? This time, we will introduce some daily works in detail. The work we do varies a lot, covering reimbursement for all kinds of activities in CLE, making posters for invited lectures, preparing documents, and assisting teachers work. Sounds complicated? In fact, for most of the times, as student assistants, we are here to help teachers with trifles so that they can squeeze more time doing other important things like teaching, organizing CLE lectures and attending academic conferences. The chores usually include but not limited to material printing, computer setting, poster making, giving out notebooks, and sundry cleanup. Although these seem to be small chores, we are still required to learn new techniques and operations to complete all the tasks. As you can imagine, it’s not easy to be qualified in this part-time job, we have to develop ourselves comprehensively to complete both mental and physical labors. We are also assigned tasks to transport important materials among different departments, and get all the required stamps and signatures signed so that the materials are valid. For example, we take a stack of receipts that have been carefully organized by Secretary Li to the Financial Department, or we help Dr. Xu take materials to the Human Resource Department to have the documents authorized. This kind of task is usually very easy to complete!   All the tasks mentioned above sound like common assistant works that can be done in any department. However, there is something special working in the CLE, and we all consider receiving foreign teachers as the most characteristic task. Since foreign teachers might come here for the first time, as hosts, we would take them to a simple Shenzhen tour; most of them need to apply for residence certificate and expert certificate so that they could stay in our campus to work; it is also our job to take them to various administration organizations to have all the documents done. The real situation is even more challenging because we will accompany them for several hours, to introduce, translate, and communicate all in English. This was not easy at the first time because there were several jargons about document transactions that I didn’t know well, but fortunately, we could still understand each other through body language and simple explanation. And foreign teachers are so kind that they never blame us for these small problems on communications; instead, they explain their ideas clearly and patiently, so we can become friends in a short time. Besides, foreign teachers that come to SUSTech are all knowledgeable and interesting persons, so after several hours’ communication, we could improve our oral English while exchange ideas with people from all over the world. We like it the most!   There is one more thing that we would like to share with you; the part-time job in CLE also helps us improve time management skills, it is surprising to find out that we can arrange our spare time more efficiently than before. Everyone is welcome to visit and join CLE! We are here waiting for you!  


Dress for Success: Making a Good Impression Without Saying a Word

Twice in mid-October, several students attended a workshop entitled “Dress for Success: Making a Good Impression Without Saying a Word.” The workshop began with a discussion about first impressions and how long it takes to form them. Research shows that we have a mere tenth of a second to make a first impression, and so we have to do everything we can to make that impression good, even before we open our mouths and say a word! Several topics were covered in this workshop, including standard dress codes for different events, such as debates, class presentations, and job interviews. There was also lots of conversation concerning the context of these events, especially when it came to culture. In the end, both the students and the workshop leader learned about how to make good impressions across different cultures. This workshop was part of a series that is meant to help students prepare for their professional and academic futures as well as give them opportunities to practice listening and speaking in English.

Exploring Intercultural Language Education – Thoughts from Macau

On Oct 27th 2016, Professor John Corbett, head of English Department at University of Macau, gave an entertaining yet provocative lecture on “Intercultural Language Education: From Curriculum to Classroom and Back Again” as part of the CLE Lecture Series. Professor Corbett introduced theories and his exploration in Intercultural Language Education.   Professor Corbett has published widely on intercultural language education, Scottish literature and the Scots language, literary translation, and corpus linguistics, and as the vice-president of the Association for Scottish Literary Studies, he has helped establish an annual Scottish Writing Exhibition at the MLA convention in the USA. He is also a member of the International Association for Languages and Intercultural Communication and edited the Association’s journal Language and Intercultural Communication for five years. Dr. Kathy O’Sullivan received a signed book donated by Professor Corbett to SUSTech Library   In the opening speech, Dr. Kathy O’Sullivan welcomed Professor Corbett as an old friend as they knew each other since her last visit to the Language Center at University of Macau. During the lecture, Professor Corbett firstly explained five ‘saviours’ in the curricular objectives under the framework of intercultural language education. He used anecdotes from his intercultural marriage to make the big intercultural issues personal and easier for the students to understand what culture was and what intercultural communication might involve. Then he introduced specific examples of classroom activities by making use of a wide array of photographs of shop signs he shot in different countries. This aroused the students’ curiosity in the culture lying behind them and their interests in the ethnographic skills involved in observing local culture. Professor Corbett then illustrated to the teachers and students how to build online community to explore culture by utilizing the platform of MOOC and other social network sites. His humorous and thought-provoking lecture evoked bursts of laughter and applause from the audience. Students were focusing on the lecture and taking notes carefully.   The lecture also ignited a series of questions among the audience in the subsequent Q&A session. Students asked about intercultural preparation before embarking on overseas education, while teachers in CLE were concerned with the role of English and intercultural issues in English teaching. The audience’s enthusiasm for the topic resulted in a lingering discussion outside the lecture hall. The audience was strongly impressed by Professor Corbett’s expertise and pioneering applications in intercultural language education. Teachers commented that Professor Corbett used his own lecture to exemplify what successful intercultural communication was and opened a vision for the teachers to explore curriculum development. Students also remarked that the lecture drew their attention to seemingly trivial cultural observation that was previously ignored, and aroused their desire to become intercultural speakers and negotiators. Reported by CLE Written by: Yuanyuan ZHANG Photos by: Gary Moran


Cognitive Metaphor Workshop

In a nutshell, last week (Oct. 12/13) nearly 40 students attended a lecture on Cognitive Linguistics presented by lecturer Nicolette Oladipo where they had to think out of the box. “Nutshell”, “think out of the box”…these are types of cognitive metaphors, also known as “dead metaphors”, a type of figure of speech used every day. Cognitive metaphors are found in everything from casual conversation to news stories and novels.   While every language has them, cognitive metaphors can be a challenge for non-native English speakers. During the workshop, students were able to learn how cognitive metaphors are constructed, compare common Chinese cognitive metaphors with similar English ones as well as learn dead metaphors unique to English.

CLE Online Professional Development Course Starts

In order to provide an opportunity for the EFL instructors in Center for Language Education to share their interests and needs, review assessment and course/task/lesson design, CLE invites Dr Shiaowei (Jasmine) CHU, ESL Instructor at University of Idaho, working with SUSTech on this project.   Shiao-Wei CHU works at the University of Idaho. As an English language educator, she has not only created learner-centered classroom environment and designed task-based learning materials, but also integrated multiple skills and technology in each lesson for English language learners. She also realizes the importance of teachers’ professional development, so she has been instructing and participating in ongoing professional development events. Her career choices have been centered on assisting and teaching English as a second/foreign language to diverse population of students. By taking the course, we hope teachers with CLE can learn practical teaching strategies and techniques, practice teacher-student conferencing skills, and read current and interesting articles related to the topic discussed in each workshop.


Co-Founder of Epigeum Lectured on the Importance of Feedback in Technology-based Instruction

Before SUSTech freshmen started their college life here, every one of them took an online course called Academic Success provided by Epigeum, Oxford University Press. It’s a course through which they may understand broadly what higher education is and develop their own learning approach. Many students said they benefited a lot from this course. Dr. Kathy O’Sullivan hosted the lecture.   On October 19th, we were honored to have Dr. David Lefevre, who is a Co-Founder of Epigeum, as our guest lecturer. He is also a long-serving director of the Educational Technology Unit at the Imperial College Business School and has led a number of high-profile e-learning projects and pioneered the use of database-driven online language learning materials. All the experience makes him an expert on technology – based education.   He shared his Epigeum story with the audience, all the while highlighting the importance of feedback in the learning process. Epigeum evolved from a project at Imperial College London Graduate School. The aim was to promote quality education resources to people worldwide. As it developed, more and more universities come together and now have developed more than 100 courses which are used by more than 230 universities globally. They are cheap in price but excellent in quality, which makes it benefit a lot of learners, including SUSTech students. While they develop courses, they also do research. For example, research on feedbacks plays an important part in the development process.  “Feedback has a powerful effect on learning. It is considered one of the ten most significant influences on learner achievement”, David said, citing Hattie and Timperley. After they analyze data collected from users, they make recommendations which will help make the courses a better fit for users. There were many questions afterwards, not least from students. David visited an English class taught by Dr. Hu Yuxiu, where the students had many questions to ask. This is why the CLE Lecture Series is a different type of lecture series, as there is a focus on involving students in the discussion. Dr. David Lefevre also visited the Teaching Affairs office and Higher Education Research Center to talk about further cooperation. His trip will really help SUSTech with internationalization, and the CLE will continue to try and bring people on campus together to communicate and collaborate on potentially exciting projects.

CLE Offering Communication Skills Course

Good communication skills are a necessity in your personal and business life. Some people are naturally good communicators. For everyone else, communication is a skill that must be nurtured. With a little time and effort, no one will ever know you weren’t born with the gift of gab. CLE arranges a number of practical courses such as Communication Skills that students will be able to access during their studies. These are designed to help you to become more self-aware, learn how to manage conversation and establish rapport effectively and to develop your communication, team-working, leadership and enterprise skills.\


An Academic Conference Simulation for Postgraduate Students

Academic study at postgraduate level requires mastery of a range of English communication skills. The CLE’s English for Graduate Studies course is designed to help MSc students acquire the academic literacy and language skills they need to succeed in English academic culture. In the session of Week 5, the course tutor Lisha Liu held a conference simulation for SUSTC MSc students. This is a language task to check their understandings of the sessions they learnt about academic listening and oral presentation skills. Before the simulated conference, student presenters were assigned to prepare 5-min English presentations related to their research fields to the general audience. During the conference, other students raised a lot of constructive questions and discussed many presentation related topics in English. Overall, this academic conference simulation was quite successful. According to the Graduate School, although the course started for only two weeks, it has already received plenty of positive feedbacks from students.       Written by Lisha Liu

CLE Team Members Recognized Overseas High-Caliber Personnel

Yuxiu HU (Lucille) and Zhuo Li (Joel) have been recognized as Overseas High – Caliber Personnel in Shenzhen and entitled to enjoy privileged treatment in accordance with Shenzhen peacock plan, which aims to collect a large batch of overseas high-level innovation talents and teams in Shenzhen special economic zone in order to develop the strategy target, drive the supporting industries in high-tech technology, finance, logistics and culture.  


Yuxiu Hu Granted Teaching Research Funding

In order to deepen the teaching reform of higher education at SUSTech, cultivate outstanding teaching achievement, enhance the quality of talents and teachers, and further benefit students at SUSTech, SUSTech grants teaching research funding to those teachers who have extensive teaching experience, solid research ability, and eagerness to explore new ways of teaching for solving specific problems in the process of teaching and practice. Yuxiu HU (Lucille) secured the 2016 teaching research funding to explore the development of a STEM-based English curriculum in higher education. The finding of this project could inform the practices of teachers, curriculum and course designers, and individuals who are working in context-based instruction settings and STEM education.

CLE Engages Students in Public Speaking Course

This fall, Dr. Zhuo Li from CLE offers a new elective course titled “Fundamentals of Public Speaking” to promote science and technology students’ public speaking skills. This course involves an action research project approved and supported by Department of Education of Guangdong Province. Dr. Li, the principal researcher and two co-researchers, Dr. Yuxiu Hu and Dr. Lisha Liu, strive to explore how flipped classroom model and MOOCs can be effectively used in teaching public speaking in college. This public speaking course started with an icebreaker requiring all students to do silent interviews in pairs before using verbal language. Comparing the two approaches to communication in this game, the students came to realize the power of speaking in communication. “Science not communicated is science not done,” by Melissa their  experience of using verbal language to do interviews following Marshall, a senior lecturer of communication skills to scientists and engineers at Penn State University, is taken as the course motto. Dr. Li says the importance of improving scientific researchers’ communication skills can never be underestimated. Globalization in this information age requires that scientific researchers should not only make innovations but also effectively to communicate about their research with others. Students did “silent interviews” in the first class.   The course delivery is modified to a blended course format using “flipped classroom” model and integrating MOOCs. International collaboration significantly contributes to the course design. This course uses lecture videos from a popular MOOC course on EdX titled “Introduction to Public Speaking” offered by Dr. Matt McGarrity from University of Washington. To obtain the consent for using the lecture videos, Dr. Li contacted Dr. McGarrity, who was very supportive and even generously shared more useful teaching resources. Moreover, the online teaching platform “Sakai” is used for the online components, including each week’s reading materials, lecture videos, and discussion questions. Students are required to finish reading and view videos before class meetings, while in-class time is devoted to group discussions and class speeches/presentations. The students’ midterm and final speeches/presentations will be recorded for their further watching and analysis. Students worked in groups to prepare demonstrations of visual aids in public speaking.   The students in this course are well aware that public speaking skills are critical to their current study, further education, and future career development. Those who have exchange experience abroad appreciate the chance to study the way they encountered abroad. For example, Jiuzhou Wang, a returned exchange student to Georgia Tech thinks this is one of the most rewarding classes he has taken at SUSTech. “We are able to discuss in groups and present to the whole class after previewing the materials before class. In such an engaging way, more learning opportunities for effective communication are created, which reminds of the classes I took in Georgia Tech,” he said. Jiuzhou Wang presented in class.   To enrich the students’ learning experience, Dr. Li has invited an experienced toastmaster from Hong Kong to do a guest speech in the upcoming November. Meanwhile, she is discussing with Dr. McGarrity for a guest talk at SUSTech next spring. In addition, Dr. Li and three sophomores, Jiuzhou Wang, Xizi Ni, Yifan Wu, are working on starting a Toastmasters Club on campus or a similar student club dedicated to improving SUSTech students’ English public speaking.


Student Workshops Begin

Throughout the fall semester the Center for Language Education will be running faculty-led workshops for students covering a wide variety of topics. Each week will have a unique topic and will be presented twice during the week. The first two workshops (Sept 26/27) were facilitated by Siqun XU from Center for Language Education on CV and Resume writing.This workshop aims to provide  students at SUSTech with practical information about how to write CV and Resume(such as academic journal papers) in general. The workshop was run in the common area of Center for Language Education where attendees received hands-on training. A list of this semester’s workshops is available here.

Siqun XU Awarded Excellent Public Service Award

Public Service Award is the highest honorary award at the SUSTech, which honors individuals and groups that have made substantial contributions to increasing public understanding of internationalization at the SUStech. The 2016 Excellent Public Service Award recognizes the continuous contribution made by Siqun XU (Adrian) honoring him for his years of distinguished public service at the CLE at SUSTech.


Life in the CLE – Student Assistants’ Perspective

Working here in CLE as student assistants, we get a unique and valuable opportunity to improve not only our English but also our own overall abilities. With an excellent atmosphere of communication among different cultures, we have learned a lot and got many chances to practice our oral English when helping friendly teachers from all over the world in the CLE. Doing some paperwork, connecting the CLE and other departments in SUSTech, helping to decorate the English classrooms and dealing with great teachers, experts and scholars from home and abroad are our daily jobs, which dramatically change us by improving our time management skills, communication skills, independence skills and team spirit. Sherry is dealing with daily issues in CLE.   Yunli YE: The most incredible experience in my school life has been to be a tour guide for new members of our SUSTech family or experts visiting our school, showing them the beauty and charm of Shenzhen, where I grew up. I remember that the first time I met Joseph I was so nervous and doubted myself. But he was very kind and open-minded, encouraging me to join in the conversation. It was a great pleasure to chat with a foreign teacher like him. We went biking along the seashore in the Mangrove Coastal Ecological Park on a tandem bicycle, which was a new thing for Joseph to try. It was a humid but interesting afternoon. I feel proud to introduce our school and city, but to me, the most valuable thing is that although I made several mistakes, I made progress by learning from them and being taught by them at the same time. Martin and me were visiting the Lianhuashan Mountain Park. Yidong FANG: Although the center will give salary us for our work, it is not the essential reason I chose to work here. I feel that I can find my special value here, which is not easily shown in other aspects of my daily life. For example, I helped the center to construct the website. During the period of constructing it, I practised my communication skills in the conversations with staff in the IT department, foreign teachers in the CLE etc. In addition, I learned more about how SUSTech works. Thus we can understand more about staff and teachers in the university. Here, I get to care more about others. In my spare time in the CLE, I will try to learn something new, for there is an up-and-coming atmosphere. Many teachers here are trying to lean more useful knowledge and skills. For them, maybe learning is a thing that will not come to an end. Frank is building our website. To study in SUSTech, English is a necessary skill and gradually becomes more important, for it is an extremely useful and globally universal tool for academic and life purposes. Being a student assistant in CLE offers great studying experiences to us. This is like a class but more than a class that any ordinary university can provide.

CLE Gives New International Students a Fashionable Welcome

The first cohort of international students has arrived at SUSTech. Dr. Kathy O’Sullivan, the director of CLE, gave them a very fun, yet meaningful workshop on intercultural communication, helping them to adapt to this whole new cultural environment. Staff and students volunteered to help and participate. Monica from the library, Bruce from senior grade, Xu and her colleagues from the Global Engagement Office all made a great contribution to this workshop. One of the most fun parts was Dr. O’Sullivan putting one Cambodian and one Chinese in a group and asking them to do two impossible missions, building the highest tower with the material provided and creating a fashionable outfit for the year 2050. They could only communicate with each other in their mother tongue. During the next few minutes, you could hear Khmer, Mandarin, even Cantonese. They used facial expressions, body gestures and every way they could think of to accomplish the missions. Soon they began to break the language barrier between each other and began to cooperate much better. They were all having fun and learning at the same time. As Dr. O’Sullivan said, culture is like an iceberg. What we can see is above the surface-the tip of an iceberg,. There is more below the surface. It’s normal for international students to encounter cultural uncertainty when they come to a foreign country, just keep an open mind regarding communication。 Wish all the best to our first cohort of international students! Here are some pictures. An enjoyable class is one of the best moments for the student. Watching her student enjoying the class is the most exciting moment for the teacher. Can you imagine they are speaking a language that their team mate can’t understand? Apparently language is not the only way of communication. Can you imagine they are speaking a language that their team mate can’t understand? Apparently language is not the only way of communication.   Written by Li Zhaoting Photo by Li Zhaoting


CLE Team Member Recognized for Teaching Excellence

The Distinguished Teaching Award highlights SUSTech’s commitment to teaching excellence and is awarded annually to selected outstanding faculty members. Several faculty members are honored each year for their work with students. Recipients are chosen based on a variety of criteria including but not limited to mastery of the subject matter; ability to engage students both within and outside of the classroom; and innovations in course and curriculum design. They are presented with a certificate and a monetary award. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that one of the CLE team has been recognised in 2016. Siqun XU (Adrian), who is a lecturer of English at the Centre of Language Education, has been awarded this for his teaching excellence. He enriches the classroom through meaningful and creative teaching approaches and mentors students through independent and creative thinking. Congratulations Adrian!

Professor Zhihui Fang on Academic Writing

On July 14th 2016, Professor Zhihui Fang from the University of Florida gave a lecture on “Writing for Academic Purposes: Moves, Strategies, and Skills” in Room 110, Teaching Building 1.  Professor Fang is currently a Professor of Education in the School of Teaching and Learning at the University of Florida, where he also coordinates the Language Arts, Reading and Children’s Literature (LARC) program. He is author of more than 100 publications that include books, book chapters, and refereed journal articles, as well as over 200 refereed, invited, keynote, and featured presentations at national and international venues. Hosted by Dr. Kathy O’Sullivan, the director of SUSTech’s Center for Language Education (CLE), Professor Fang’s lecture signified CLE’s lecture series kicked off at SUSTech.  Professor Fang talked about academic writing.   This lecture started with an impromptu rap by Frederick, Professor’s teenage son. Frederick invited the audiences to give him 10 English words and then did a freestyle rap with those words given. All warmly applauded Frederick’s impressive sophistication of language use and stunning on-stage reaction. Frederic defined the lyrics of his favorite pop songs as a type of creative writing, which helped to subtly shift the topic to his father’s research on academic writing. This 16-year old American high school student firmly expressed that pop music and academic research should not be taken incompatible. Instead, they supplemented each other in everyone’s multiliterate experience. A special warm-up by Frederick’s freestyle rap   After the special warm-up, Professor Fang introduced the features of academic writing, the common problems and their solutions. Professor Fang provided sufficient examples to gave all a systematic view about the moves and strategies that can be used in academic writing. Having had all audiences engaged in reflecting on and identifying the challenges they encounter in academic writing, Professor Fang demonstrated evidence-based strategies for coping with these challenges. Audiences attentively listened to the lecture.   In the following Q&A sessions, the students actively participated in asking questions about their own writing problems. Professor Fang gave detailed suggestions of how to avoid over quoting and some logic problems such as incoherence in argumentation, which are often detected in Chinese students ’writing. Professor Fang’s expertise in academic writing instruction was highly appreciated by the audiences. According to the students, as part of outreach service of CLE’s academic writing courses, this lecture could not only enhance their understanding about essay writing in some language tests such as TOEFL and IELTS, but also help them prepared for thesis writing. The postdoctoral researchers and research assistants responded that this lecture was extremely helpful with their research writing. During his three-day visit at SUSTech, Professor Fang was also invited by CLE to give three teacher training sessions about teaching English reading and writing and hold two meetings with English instructors and students, respectively. All attendees benefited enormously from Professor’s valuable guidance on English teaching and learning   Reported by CLE Written by: Jishu Gao, Zhuo Li Photos by: Gary Moran